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Sunny Days for SAT

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Title: Sunny Days for SAT


1

Improve Student Achievement on the SAT Georgia
Department of Education Kathy Cox State School
Superintendent
March 8, 2005Georgia Conference on High School
Improvement
2
Charlotte Robinson
Program Manager Advanced Placement, SAT
PSAT Georgia Department of Education 404-656-6854
crobinso_at_doe.k12.ga.us

3
EDUCATION PROGRAM SPECIALISTS-AP,SAT,PSAT
  • MAUREEN CLOUSE
  • maureen.clouse_at_doe.k12.ga.us
  • 404-657-7062
  • GEORGIA MCSWAIN
  • gmcswain_at_doe.k12.ga.us
  • 404-657-9799

4
Improve SAT Scores
  • Essential Questions
  • Is your school
  • Giving all 10th grade students the PSAT?
  • Using the Score Report Plus?
  • Using the Summary of Answers Skills Report?
  • Using AP Potential to build your AP program?
  • Building content specific vertical teams?
  • Following a plan of action?
  • Orienting students to the New SAT writing section?

5
Essential Question 1
  • Is your school giving all 10th graders the PSAT?

6
PSAT/NMSQT Connections
  • to colleges
  • to scholarship opportunities
  • to the new SAT
  • to AP
  • to individual students
  • to the classroom

7
District SAT Scores2003-2004
8
District SAT Scores, 2005
9
10th grade PSAT
  • It provides students with great practice
  • for the SAT.
  • Students become familiar with the format,
  • timing, question-types and expectations on an
  • academic reasoning skills test.
  • The State of Georgia pays for all tenth graders
  • to take the PSAT.

10
10th grade PSAT
  • With the national norm reference for both
  • juniors and sophomores, students get a first
  • look at how they compare to others who will
  • soon graduate and apply for college.

11
10th grade PSAT
  • The question analysis and the skills feedback
  • in all three major academic areas help
  • students identify areas of difficulty while
    there
  • is still time to improve and to be prepared
  • for the academic rigors of college.

12
PSAT/NMSQT Content andQuestion Types
13
Essential Question 2
  • Is your school using the Student Score Reports?

14
PSAT/NMSQT Student Connection
  • Complete, personalized item analysis
  • Individual skills feedback
  • Enhanced learning via complete answer
    explanations
  • Tips on how to improve
  • Initial guidance on educational plans

15
PSAT/NMSQT Score Report Plus
  • For students and parents
  • Students get test books back for review
  • Complete, question-level detail, including
    performance
  • Skills feedback and suggestions for how to
    improve
  • Full, online explanations for all answers
  • For teachers
  • Insight into areas of academic weakness and an
    opportunity to revisit questions with students
    for better understanding
  • For teachers and school counselors
  • Insight into major of interest to help
    teachers/counselors work more practically with
    students
  • Insights into interests and academic needs to
    guide students in selecting an appropriate
    program of study

16
Score Report Plus
Outside cover helps students understand the
score report. School gets 2 copies one for
student, one for school
17
Score Report Plus
Clearly shows scores and what they mean
18
www.collegeboard.com/psatextra
19
Score Report Plus
Scores clearly displayed Percentiles
graphically displayed (sophomores get sophomore
) Projected SAT range shown on number line
format
20
Score Report Plus
21
Score Report Plus
22
Score Report Plus
Personalized feedback on academic skills
that need improvement.
23
PSAT/NMSQTData for Schools and Districts
  • Summary Reports
  • State Standards Mapping
  • Summary of Answers and Skills
  • Student Data on Disk
  • AP Potential

24
Essential Question 3
  • Is your school using the
  • PSAT Summary
  • of Answers and Skills?

25
SOAS
  • District SOAS is the best place to begin getting
    the big picture for each grade, and across
    grades (and this should be done for V (Critical
    Reading), M and W)
  • School SOAS is the best place to begin
    identifying school level issues for each grade,
    and across grades

26
SOAS
  • Details the performance of a group (by grade) on
    each individual question
  • Provides insights into wrong answer behavior by
    the group
  • Summarizes comparative standing on skills,
    relative to the state and nation
  • Compares performance, on each question, to the
    state, nation and comparable group (expected
    performance)

27
What is a comparable group?
  • Useful statistical model
  • A statistically created group (virtual group)
  • Mirrors your groups performance profile.
  • This creates an expected performance indicator
    for your group on each question.
  • Provides more actionable feedback than state or
    national averages on questions/skills.

28
To access SOAS
  • http//www.collegeboard.com/prof/
  • counselors/tests/psat/sanswer.html

29
Professional Login Account
30
SOAS Report Summary of Answers and Skills
31
Sample SOAS, Page 1
  • SOAS explained

32
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33
SOAS Contents
  • Critical Reading (pp. 2-6)
  • Analyze Correct Critical Reading Answers Page 3
  • Analyze Incorrect Critical Reading Answers
    Pages 4-5
  • Analyze Performance on Critical Reading Skills
    Page 6
  • Math Reasoning (pp. 7-11)
  • Analyze Correct Math Answers Page 8
  • Analyze Incorrect Math Answers Pages 9-10
  • Analyze Incorrect Answers on Math Free-Response
    Section Page 10
  • Analyze Performance on Math Skills Page 11
  • Writing Skills (pp.12-16)
  • Analyze Correct Writing Skills Answers Page 13
  • Analyze Incorrect Writing Skills Answers Pages
    14-15
  • Analyze Performance on Writing Skills Page 16

34
Seven Steps to Using Your SOAS Data
  • Focus on the questions that are noted on the Test
    Question Detail log.
  • Review the incorrect answer choices in the test
    book to discover possible issues.
  • Identify skills assessed by items students
    missed.
  • Make inferences about what led to
    misunderstanding.
  • Share problem questions with students in math and
    English classes to gain further insight.
  • Identify where in the curriculum the skills are
    taught.
  • Work within departments and classrooms to deal
    with common issues that need curricular attention.

35
Analyze Correct Critical Reading Answers
  • Read through the text of test to understand what
    is contained in this section.
  • Note the keys for different comparison group
    codes.
  • Note that data is provided in various ways in a
    table, and in two different charts.
  • Bar graph comparisons
  • Comparable group comparisons
  • The difficulty level of each question is noted,
    ranging from 1 (easy) to 9 (difficult).

36
Analyze Performance on Writing Skills
  • This section identifies skills that are tied to
    test questions and provides a comparative look at
    performance.
  • State and local performancerepresented by
    symbolsis shown in relation to the national
    average line.

37
Analyze Incorrect Math Answers
  • Text explains the data.
  • Look at popular wrong
  • answers for insight into
  • students difficulty with
  • the question.

38
Analyze Incorrect Math Answers
  • Some hints
  • The percentage indicators help identify questions
    that caused problems for large percentage of
    students.
  • Letters identify the incorrect answer choice.
  • Correct answer is noted in gray shaded cell on
    right.
  • Percentage of students who omitted the question
    is in black.

39
Analyze Incorrect Math AnswersFree Response
Questions
  • Correct answer(s)
  • Most popular incorrect answer for each group
  • The rest of the incorrect answers are grouped
    together.

40
Test Question Detail Report
41
Essential Question 4
  • Is your school using
  • AP Potential to build
  • a strong AP Program?

42
Importance of Access to AP
  • AP access linked to success in college
  • Rigorous high school curriculum is key
  • AP participation linked to college completion
  • More important than socioeconomic status
  • More important than GPA

43
Advanced Placement
In June 1999, the U.S. Department of Education
released a study by Clifford Adelman
showing that by the time students enter college,
the type of courses they took in high school is
more important than test scores, class rank, or
grade averages. Adelman found that students
participating in AP courses were significantly
more likely to attain a college degree than those
without an AP experience.
44
The AP Program Benefits for Students
  • Chance of those going to college who finish and
    receive a Bachelors degree
  • 85 of those taking AP continue education beyond
    high school
  • AP courses related more to degree completion than
    mere entry into college

Answers in the Tool Box, 1999, US Department of
Education
45
Advanced Placement
If indeed being able to participate in
challenging courses in high school is key to
success in college, then every high school kid
ought to have that opportunity at their school.
Its a fundamental educational equity issue.
Lee Jones, Education Week, 4/25/02
46
PSAT/NMSQT and AP Connection
  • Research shows the relationship between
    PSAT/NMSQT and AP.
  • PSAT/NMSQT scores are a significant predictor of
    students AP Exam grades.

47
AP Potential

  • A tool that uses PSAT/NMSQT data to
  • connect students to increased
  • opportunities
  • aid schools in creating new AP courses
  • identify potential AP students who
  • might not have been identified via the
  • normal procedures

48
AP Potential
  • Identifies diamond-in-the-rough AP students
  • Indicates AP courses for which they might be
    suited
  • Promotes equity
  • Helps your school find candidates for AP courses
  • Provides useful lists for principals and
    counselors
  • Expand AP programs
  • Add courses
  • Increase enrollment in current AP courses

49
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54
AP Potential
  • http//www.appotential.collegeboard.com
  • Click on About AP Potential
  • Click on Demo
  • If you have your code, you can pull reports.

55
Essential question 5
  • Do you have content specific MS/HS vertical
    teams?

56
What is a vertical team?
  • A vertical team is made up of same content area
    teachers from a middle and high school feeder
    pattern. Teachers focus on vertical alignment of
    rigorous curricula and prepare students for high
    level courses including Advanced Placement.
    Pre-AP training from the College Board is
    available.

57
What is Pre-AP?
Pre-AP Professional Development (Pre-AP or
Vertical Team Training) is a suite of K-12
Professional Development resources and services.
The purpose of Pre-AP is to equip all middle and
high school teachers with the strategies and
tools they need to engage their students in
active, high-level learning, thereby ensuring
that every middle and high school student
develops the skills, habits of mind, and concepts
needed to succeed in college. Pre-AP is a key
component of the College Board's K-12
Professional Development unit.
58
Who benefits from Pre-AP?
Everyone benefits from AP. Pre-AP prepares a
growing numbers of students, especially those
traditionally underrepresented in AP courses, for
the challenges offered by the Advanced Placement
Program. The explicitly stated goals of Pre-AP
are higher academic standards greater inclusion
increased communication, coordination,
enthusiasm, and empowerment closer ties between
AP courses and the courses preceding them and
wider dissemination of successful teaching
strategies. Consequently, both the teachers and
students are better prepared.
59
Essential Question 6
  • Is your school
  • following a
  • plan of action?

60
Improvement Plan
  • Determine from the PSAT SOAS
  • What skills are being measured?
  • What information can you gain from looking at
    the wrong answers students chose?
  • Which questions were answered correctly more
  • or less frequently than others?
  • Where in the curriculum are these skills taught
  • and reinforced?

61
Improvement Plan
  • Consider
  • What role do all teachers in the school
  • (beyond English and math) play in helping
  • students develop critical thinking and
  • reasoning skills?
  • What are some ways to involve the
  • school as a whole in focusing on skills
  • measured by the PSAT/NMSQT?

62
Essential Question 7
  • Is your school orienting students to the New SAT
    writing section?

63
New SAT Writing
Section
  • Short essay
  • Measures ability to organize ideas, express ideas
    clearly, support main idea, use conventions of
    standard written English
  • Multiple-choice
  • Measures ability to improve sentences and
    paragraphs, identify errors (diction, grammar,
    sentence construction, subject-verb agreement,
    proper word usage, wordiness)

64
New SAT Writing Section
  • A. Student written essay (1/3 of
    writing score)
  • 1st section of
    SAT test - 25 minutes
  • Rubric -scoring
    guide for essays
  • B. Multiple-choice questions (2/3 of
    writing score)
  • errors in sentences
    25 questions
  • C. improvements in sentences 18
    questions
  • D. improvement in paragraphs 6
    questions

65
New SAT Writing Section
  • Consider carefully the following excerpt and
    the assignment below it. Then plan and write an
    essay that explains your ideas as persuasively as
    possible. Keep in mind that the support you
    provide both reasons and examples will help
    make your view convincing to the reader.

66
NEW SAT WRITING
  • Example of an essay writing prompt
  • The well-known proverb Ignorance is bliss
    suggests that people with knowledge of the
    worlds complexities and its limitations are
    often unhappy, while their less-knowledgeable
    counterparts remain contented. But how accurate
    is this folk wisdom? A recent study showed that
    well-informed people were more likely to report
    feelings of well-being. In fact, more knowledge
    leads people to feel better about themselves and
    more satisfaction with their lives.
  • Adapted from Lee Sigelman, Is Ignorance Bliss? A
    Reconsideration of the Folk Wisdom.

67
New SAT Writing
  • Assignment What is your view of the idea
    that more knowledge makes people happier? In an
    essay, support your position by discussing an
    example (or examples) from literature, the arts,
    science and technology, current events, or your
    own experience or observation.

68
New SAT Scoring Guide
69
New SAT Scoring Guide
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