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Tropical Rainforest

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The climate of the Tropical Rainforest is very different than most biomes. ... The soil in the rainforest is thin and often waterlogged. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Tropical Rainforest


1
Tropical Rainforest
  • Jen Richardson
  • AP Biology 8
  • 4/5/01

2
Climate
The climate of the Tropical Rainforest is very
different than most biomes. Temperatures in
tropical rainforest regions are between 20 and
29 C (68 and 84 F), and in no month is the
temperature below 18 C (64 F). Although the
climate supporting tropical rainforests is
normally hot, temperatures never reach the high
values regularly recorded in drier places to the
north and south of the equator. This is partly
due to high levels of cloud cover, which limit
the number of sunshine hours per day to between
four and six. In hilly areas where air masses
rise and cool because of the landscape, the hours
of sunlight may be even fewer.
3
Climate
  • The heat may seem extreme owing to the high
    levels of humidity, which is usually higher than
    50 percent by day and approach almost 100 percent
    at night.To make it even more uncomfortable, the
    average wind speeds are usually lest than 6 miles
    per hour and even less than five miles per hour
    in some areas.

4
Climate
  • Hurricanes occur periodically in some coastal
    regions, such as in the West Indies and in parts
    of the western Pacific region. Although they
    dont happen frequently, such storms have an
    important effect on forest structure and
    regeneration of vegetation.

5
Climate
  • Use the following hyperlink to compare the
    rainforests climate with your own.
  • How rainy is the rainforest?

6
Soil Type
The soil in the rainforest is thin and often
waterlogged. Due to high temperature and
moisture in the biome, decomposition occurs much
more rapidly than it would in a temperate forest.
A leaf falling from a tree would take
approximately two months to decompose in a
rainforest. Otherwise, this feat could take
almost seven years. Minerals that are released by
decomposition are rapidly taken up again by
plants or taken away by water that trickles down
through the soil. Because of this, almost all of
the forests nutrients are not in the soil but in
the bodies of living organisms.
7
Vegetation
  • The tropical rain forest is the richest source of
    plant life on earth. There are so many different
    kinds of plants there, scientists don't even know
    them all yet. It is a perfect place for growing
    plants. The average temperature is 70 to 90
    degrees and there is plenty of water.

8
(No Transcript)
9
TREES
  • Some canopy trees grow to 120 feet. The leaves
    are so big they can be used for an umbrella! The
    leaves are thick and waxy, and have "drip tips"
    so that water can drain off. Fruit trees provide
    food for many rainforest animals and people.

10
Air Plants
  • Thousands of flowering plants grow on the trees.
    Their roots are not planted in soil, but take
    their food from air and water all around. Insects
    and even small animals live in and on these air
    plants. They have beautiful flowers and fruit, to
    provide food for forest dwellers. Butterflies,
    hummingbirds and bees drink the nectar from the
    flowers.

11
Bromeliads
  • The bromeliad is a kind of tropical plant with
    leaves like a pineapple. It collects water in
    its' center. This water forms a small pool for
    frogs, lizards, and insects to live in.

12
  • There are many kinds of vines and ferns which
    connect the layers of the rain forest. Mushrooms
    and herbs grow on the forest floor. People can
    learn to gather fruits and nuts for food, as well
    as plants for medicine, without harming the rain
    forest.

13
Common Plants
  • Here are some plants you may know. They first
    came from the rain forest!
  •         
  •          bananna
  •          coffee
  •          lemon
  •          orange
  •          peanut
  •          Pepper

14
Rainforest Layers
  • The rain forest is divided into four main
    layers. Different kinds of trees, flowers, and
    other plants grow in each layer. These layers are
    called the emergent layer, the canopy, the
    understory, and the forest floor.

15
Layers of the Rainforest
  • Emergent Layer - The Top Layer These huge trees
    rise above all other trees in the forest and grow
    to 150 ft. tall. They receive the most sunlight.

16
Layers of the Rainforest
  • Canopy
  • A canopy (or cover) of very tall trees is the
    next layer of the rain forest. The treetops, or
    crowns, grow very close together and form a lush
    green garden in the air. The canopy is rich with
    plants, animals and insects. Many beautiful
    birds, butterflies, hummingbirds, and flowering
    plants live here. Monkeys, bats, reptiles, and
    other animals swing, swoop, and climb through the
    canopy.

17
Layers of the Rainforest
  • Understory - The Middle Layer Smaller trees,
    bushes, and plants such as ferns, live in the
    understory. Not much sunlight reaches here
    because the canopy blocks the sun. Still, many
    birds and animals make their home in the
    understory. Forest wildcats, such as the leopard,
    are excellent tree climbers. They will chase
    monkeys and squirrels through the understory for
    food.

18
Layers of the Rainforest
  • Forest Floor - The Bottom Layer Few plants grow
    on the forest floor because almost no sunlight
    reaches here. But the leaves and plants which
    drop from the upper layers provide food and
    shelter for animals and insects who live on the
    forest floor. Mice, frogs, snakes and insects
    look for food. Larger animals, such as wild boar
    and deer, also make the forest floor their home.

19
Prevailing Winds
P R E V A I L I N G
W I N D S
20
Prevailing Winds
  • The winds that affect the tropical biomes include
    the Southest Trade winds, the Subtropical Highs
    and the Prevailing West wind, along with the
    Tropical Circulation Cell.

21
Animals
There are many species of animals, ranging from
insects to jaguars.
22
Animals
23
Animals
These are some examples of some of the animals
you would find in a tropical rainforest.
24
Animals
  • A Rainforest Journal

25
Carbon Cycle
26
Nitrogen cycle
27
Phosphorus Cycle
28
Primary Succession
  • Primary succession occurs when there is initially
    no soil in an area. Lichens, moss and weeds
    establish themselves in new areas to eventually
    turn emptiness into wooded areas.

29
Secondary Succession
  • Secondary succession is the series of changes
    that occur in a community that has been
    disturbed. The land may have been logged or there
    may have been fire. One of the requirements for
    this is that the land wasnt completely stripped
    of its soil and vegetation. In the rainforest,
    this occurs after trees have been cut down. The
    trees that replace the originals (pioneer trees)
    grow slower, but remain healthy, especially when
    they reach a respectable size.

30
J A G U A R
31
The Jaguar
  • Jaguars live in Central and South America in
    rain forests. They live for 11 to 22 years old
    depending if they are wild or captive. Jaguars
    get their food by hunting because they are
    carnivores. Some animals jaguars eat are
    monkeys, sloths, porcupines, fish, armadillos,
    birds, snakes, turtles, mice, deer, capybaras and
    iguanas. Male jaguars always hunt alone. Jaguars
    are nocturnal animals, meaning they hunt at night
    and sleep in the day. Jaguars are camouflaged by
    their fur somewhat, but they rarely have
    predators so it isnt needed, except when
    hunting.

32
The Jaguar
  • There is a common misconception that jaguars
    attack people and cattle. This is not true. In
    fact, the jaguars biggest predator is poachers.
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