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Comprehensive School Reform CSR Grant Information Session

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Title: Comprehensive School Reform CSR Grant Information Session


1
Comprehensive School Reform (CSR) Grant
Information Session
  • May 24, 2005

2
The Purpose of the CSR Program as authorized
under Title 1 Part F, NCLB Act of 2001
  • Improve student achievement in low performing,
    high poverty schools,
  • Implementation of reform strategies, that are
    part of a comprehensive school wide plan- not
    isolated or fragmented approaches,
  • Utilizing strategies that have proven to be
    either effective or scientifically researched.

3
The Purpose of the CSR Program as authorized
under Title 1 Part F, NCLB Act of 2001
  • Leverage systemic improvements in student
    achievement throughout the Title 1 program,
  • Current context of NCLB, CSR provides financial
    incentives for schools to increase focus on
    helping ALL students reach high standards.

4
Comprehensive School ReformWhat is it?
  • Intended to stimulate school wide change by
    integrating the Eleven Required Components
  • Schools identify areas of need, then create a
    plan to address the needs
  • CSR funds are NOT intended for planning, intended
    for implementation
  • CSR funds are NOT intended to supplement or
    supplant ongoing work.

5
Comprehensive School ReformWhat is it?
  • Substantive and significant changes in teaching
    and learning
  • Requires ongoing professional development and
    full buy in from the school faculty
  • Requires ongoing assistance from external
    partners
  • Stresses evaluation as a process for continuous
    improvement.

6
Maines Comprehensive School Reform Program 1998
- 2005
  • Since 1998, MDOE has strategically used CSR funds
    to leverage change
  • 33 high schools funded to implement the Core
    Principles and Practices of Promising Futures
  • Established the Center for Inquiry on Secondary
    Education
  • Created a state wide dialogue and climate in
    support of school transformation.

7
Maines Comprehensive School Reform Program 1998
- 2005
  • Maine schools that have had the most success
    have
  • Aligned and integrated their various reform
    strategies to achieve a vision,
  • Engaged in reforms with direct implications for
    teaching and learning,
  • Made organizational changes in support of
    teaching and learning,
  • Have a strong principal and leadership team that
    can articulate and lead they way to systemic
    transformation.

8
Maines Comprehensive School Reform Program 1998
- 2005
  • Allocated time and resources for professional
    learning over time,
  • Utilized external partners to assist with school
    change process,
  • Use the CSR evaluation cycle to reflect on
    program implementation and student performance
    data to make mid course corrections

9
Maines Comprehensive School Reform Program 1998
- 2005
  • Engaged parents and community members in the work
    of school reform, for ex student led
    conferences, exhibitions, community based
    learning experiences, reflecting on performance
    data.

10
Maines Comprehensive School Reform Program 2005
and Beyond
  • Governor Baldaccis and Commissioner Gendrons
    vision
  • Create a seamless system, pre-K -16, that
    supports each students achievement of the
    Learning Results and ensures preparation and
    success in college, work, and citizenship in the
    21st century.

11
Maines Comprehensive School Reform Program 2005
and Beyond
  • Middle/Junior High Schools and High Schools must
    work more closely together,
  • Expanded mission and scope of work for Center for
    Inquiry on Secondary Education,
  • Now, the Center for Educational Transformation,
  • Middle level consultants with expertise in middle
    level reform.

12
Maines Comprehensive School Reform Program 2005
and Beyond
  • 4th Cohort Schools will work to transform the
    educational system into
  • More equitable, rigorous, and personalized
    teaching and learning experiences that result in
    improved student performance of Maines Learning
    Results and prepares each child for postsecondary
    education, work, and citizenship in the 21st
    century.

13
Maines Comprehensive School Reform Program 2005
and Beyond
  • Federal legislation requires states to ensure
    that funded schools use strategies that have
    strong evidence of significantly improving
    students academic performance,
  • Strong evidence means either through
  • Scientifically based research studies, or
  • Evidence of success through replication in
    multiple sites.

14
MDOE has identified the following research
based/effective practices
  • 1. Implement a postsecondary education
    preparation strategy that involves every student
    and faculty member and includes
  • a. The elimination of tracking,
  • b. A rigorous curriculum for all students,
  • c. The use of differentiated instruction methods.

15
MDOE has identified the following research
based/effective practices
  • 2. Implement a school wide adolescent literacy
    strategy that
  • a. Utilizes research-based strategies for
    literacy teaching and learning for all students,
  • b. Supports reading and writing to learn in each
    of the content areas of a rigorous curriculum,
  • c. Provides both remediation and acceleration.

16
MDOE has identified the following research
based/effective practices
  • 3. Implement a small learning communities
    strategy that
  • a. Links supportive relationships with high
    standards for achievement through academic teams
  • b. Focuses on increasing students aspirations
    and supporting students through important
    transitions
  • c. Is supported by a flexible school schedule.

17
MDOE has identified the following research
based/effective practices
  • 4. Implement a professional learning communities
    strategy
  • a. Provides the faculty with specific and
    ongoing professional learning focused on
  • i. differentiated instruction,
  • ii. rigorous curriculum,
  • iii. adolescent literacy strategies
  • iv. smaller learning community.

18
11 Required Components of a CSR Program
  • Documentation of needs and how the program
    addresses the needs (20 points)
  • Comprehensive design with aligned components
    timelines for implementation (10 points)
  • Measurable goals for student achievement (15
    points)

19
11 Required Components of a CSR Program
  • 4. Use of research based strategies and effective
    practices to improve academic achievement (20
    points)
  • 5. Professional learning to support design
    implementation of the program (15 points)
  • 6. High quality external technical assistance
    from one or more partners (10 points)

20
11 Required Components of a CSR Program
  • 7. Leadership for CSR (10 points)
  • 8. Meaningful parent community involvement in
    school improvement activities (10 points)
  • 9. Support within the school district for the
    proposed program (15 10 points)
  • 10. Annual evaluation strategies (10 points)
  • 11. Budget and coordination of resources to
    support sustain the CSR effort (15 points).

21
Eligibility Requirements for CSR Applicants
  • Designated middle or junior high schools, lowest
    grade served grade 5
  • High schools
  • Either on Monitor Status in 2003-2004 or
    2004-2005
  • CIPS Status in 2003-2004 or 2004-2005
  • Title 1 Eligible or Title 1 Served in 2003-2004
    or 2004-2005.

22
Consortium of Schools
  • CSR legislation defines a consortium of small
    schools serving a TOTAL of 500 students
  • Schools that want to implement the same reform
    program
  • Explain the commitment to work together
  • Each schools application will be evaluated
    individually- one may be accepted while another
    may not be accepted
  • One 50,000 award will be made to the consortium.

23
Funding
  • Estimated Number of Grant Awards up to 7
  • MDOE will make awards of sufficient size and
    scope to support a portion of the program
    proposed
  • Minimum awards size 50,000
  • Funds are not meant for pre-planning
  • Meant to support schools ready to begin in
    September 2005.

24
Fund Use
  • Funds will be available after June 1, 2005
  • CSR funds must be coordinated with other federal,
    state, and local resources identified by the
    school and district
  • Funds are intended to supplement not supplant
    funds already received by the school.

25
Duration of the CSR Program
  • Initial one-year approval
  • Renewable based upon demonstration of success in
    implementing the CSR program and the student
    results achieved
  • School Portfolio and Evaluation Processes.

26
Selection Process
  • Expert panel will use the Scoring Rubric in
    Appendix A
  • Review how well each applicant addresses and
    integrates the eleven components in the program
    narrative
  • Addresses the achievement needs of students in
    equitable, rigorous, and personalized manner
  • Elevate aspirations of students so they are
    prepared for college, work and citizenship.

27
Selection Process
  • Total possible points for the narrative- 160
    points
  • In addition, a school may receive up to 36
    possible Competitive Priority Points
  • High Schools AYP Status http//www.state.me.us/e
    ducation/Press20Releases/AYP/FY2005/0405grade11.h
    tm
  • Middle Schools AYP Status
  • http//www.state.me.us/education/Press20Releases/
    AYP/FY2005/0405grade8.htm

28
Selection Process
  • High poverty points will be awarded by the
    districts average of students receiving Free and
    Reduced Lunch
  • http//thor.dafs.state.me.us/pls/doe_sfsr/eddev.ed
    534.ed534_parameters
  • When you open this page, select 2005 fiscal year
    list and sort by district and then click submit.

29
Selection Process
  • Awards will be made to schools scoring the
    highest on the program narrative and the
    Competitive Priority Points
  • Combined total of 196 points
  • At any point, the MDOE may call to verify any
    part of the application package
  • All funds may not be distributed.

30
Application Submission
  • July 13, 2005 by 200 p.m.
  • One complete and original CSR application package
    is due with three additional copies
  • Division of Purchases, Burton Cross Office
    Building, Augusta
  • No faxed or emailed applications
  • Applications received after this time will be
    rejected.

31
Timeline
  • July 13, 2005 Applications submitted to the
    Department of Purchases
  • July 14- 20 MDOE Reviews Applications
  • By July 21 Announce CSR Awards
  • July 25 Summer Academy
  • August 4 Convening of CSR Grantees

32
Application Components
  • A completed application must include the
    following components and be packaged as listed
    below
  • LEA Cover Page (Form 2)
  • School Cover Page (one for each school submitting
    an application)
  • The Schools CSR Program Narrative (25 pages
    maximum)
  • Assurances from Technical Assistance Partner
    multiple copies may be needed for submission
    (Form 3)

33
Application Components
  • Verification of Support for the CSR Program
    within the School (Form 4)
  • Verification of Support for the CSR Program
    within the District (Form 5)
  • Budget Summary (Form 6)
  • Budget Narrative (Form 7)
  • List of Schools Participating in a Consortium
    (Form 8)

34
Application Requirements
  • Calculating Your Competitive Priority Points
    (Form 9)
  • Any application missing any of these items will
    be rejected and not evaluated
  • Required forms are NOT a part of 25 page limit
  • Address the eleven required components in
    sequential order
  • Cover page should be page 1.

35
Application Requirements
  • No extraneous attachments are to be submitted.
    Materials others than those required will not be
    reviewed
  • Use one and a half line spacing throughout your
    responses
  • Use one-inch margins for text sections
  • Use at least 11-point font size.

36
Application Requirements
  • Use subheads and bold type to make your proposal
    reader friendly
  • You must use charts and bullets where
    appropriate these will count toward the 25-page
    maximum for the narrative
  • Applications must be stapled. Please do not
    submit applications in notebooks, folders or
    other packaging.

37
Expectations for CSR Grantees
  • In addition to the program proposed a school will
    be expected to
  • 5. Make the PSAT available to all sophomores and
    juniors,
  • 6. Participate in the Advanced Placement
    Incentive Program,
  • 7. Participate in the Team Leadership
    Collaborative
  • 8. Develop a strategic action plan annually.

38
Expectations for CSR Grantees
  • 9. Administer the CSR On-line Survey and
    participate in the CSR Portfolio Process annually
    for evaluation purposes,
  • 10. Participate in the annual Promising Futures
    Summer Academy,
  • 11. Begin implementation of the proposed CSR
    program during the 2005-2006 school year, and
  • 12. Serve as a demonstration site.

39
What to do if you have questions
  • If you have questions when putting together your
    application DO NOT CALL!
  • WE CANT RESPOND!!
  • Questions must be submitted in writing via email.
    We will post responses on www.state.me.us/educat
    ion
  • Under Initiatives you will see the link to the
    CSR Program.

40
If you have questions
  • Email Susan Johnson or Tonia Stevens
  • susan.johnson_at_maine.gov
  • tonia.stevens_at_maine.gov
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