Turnover in the Military: Impact of workplace stressors - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Turnover in the Military: Impact of workplace stressors PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 12b176-MjcwZ



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Turnover in the Military: Impact of workplace stressors

Description:

Organizational downsizing weakens employee loyalty and trust (Rynes ... Job Satisfaction (Based on: Hackman & Oldham, 1975; Spector, 1985) (23 items; a = .94) ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:60
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 21
Provided by: marien3
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Turnover in the Military: Impact of workplace stressors


1
Turnover in the Military Impact of workplace
stressors
  • Captain Marie Norris, CD, MSc
  • Directorate of Human Resource Research
    Evaluation

2
Background
  • Organizational downsizing weakens employee
    loyalty and trust (Rynes Cable, 2003).
  • It is crucial that employers develop an
    understanding of the reasons that employees are
    leaving the organization.
  • Purpose of this study is to examine some job
    factors that may contribute to employee turnover.

3
Traditional Stressors
  • Research has shown that role stressors (i.e.,
    ambiguity and conflict) are important predictors
    of job outcomes, specifically relating to
    satisfaction, commitment, strain and turnover
    (Bhagat, McQuaid, Lindholm, Segovis, 1985
    ODriscoll Beehr, 1994).
  • Research tends to examine only role ambiguity and
    conflict, while ignoring other role stressors,
    such as insufficiency and overload.

4
Non-traditional Stressors
  • Perceived changes in organizational image/values
    that are incongruent with an employees may lead
    to increased stress levels (Judge Bretz, 1992
    OReilly, Chatman, Caldwell, 1991 Sheridan,
    1992).
  • Recruiting incentives can be perceived as an
    unfair distribution of rewards and result in
    negative reactions, including reductions in work
    enthusiasm and pro-social behaviours (Heilman,
    McCullough, Gilbert, 1996 Truxillo Bauer,
    1999).

5
Moderating Factors
  • Moderator research in turnover is generally
    limited to psychometric, demographic, and
    contextual variables (Griffeth et al., 2000).
  • Current study examines factors that may mitigate
    relationships between workplace stressors and
    unnecessary voluntary turnover.
  • This examination is important because it has been
    well established the existence of stressors does
    not always result in negative outcomes (Lazarus
    Folkman, 1984).

6
Goals of Current Study
  • To assess the relationship between role stressors
    and job satisfaction and turnover intentions.
  • To assess the incremental variance explained by
    organizational image/values and feelings toward
    recruiting incentives.
  • To assess the moderating effects of
    organizational level factors (i.e.,
    organizational commitment, perceived
    organizational support and voice) on the
    relationship between workplace stressors and job
    satisfaction and turnover intentions.

7
Conceptual Model
Proposed Moderators
Job Satisfaction
Commitment Affective Continuance Normative
Ambiguity
Role Stressors
Conflict
Insufficiency
Perceived Organizational Support
Turnover Intentions
Overload
Non-Traditional Stressors
Change Org Values
Voice Active Passive
Thoughts of Turnover
Recruiting Incentives
8
Method
  • Participants
  • Survey sent to 6,000 Regular Force members in 14
    military occupations
  • 2,748 surveys were returned (45.8 response
    rate)
  • Average age 39 years (SD 5.63)
  • 72 Anglophones 27.1 Francophones
  • 81.9 males 16.8 females and,
  • Average years of service 18.5 years (SD 5.47).
  • Procedure
  • Electronically administered via the CF Intranet.

9
Measures Predictor Variables
  • Role Stressors (Osipow Spokane, 1984)
  • Role ambiguity (3 items a .76)
  • Role conflict (3 items a .75)
  • Role insufficiency (3 items a .75)
  • Role overload (3 items a .79)
  • Non-traditional stressors
  • Perceived Changes in Organizational image/values
    (6 items a .75)
  • Emotional reactions to recruiting bonus
  • (5 items a .88) (Shaver, Schwartz, Kirson,
    OConnor, 1987).

10
Measures Moderator Variables
  • Organizational Commitment (Meyer, Allen, Smith,
    1993)
  • Affective commitment (6 items a .82)
  • Continuance commitment (6 items a .77)
  • Normative commitment (6 items a .81)
  • Perceived Organizational Support
  • (4 items a .83) (Eisenberger, Huntington,
    Hutchinson, Sowa, 1986)
  • Voice (Morrison Phelps, 1999)
  • Active voice (1 item)
  • Passive voice (3 items a .79)

11
Measures Criterion Variables
  • Turnover Intentions (Hom Griffeth, 2001)
  • Intentions to turnover (3 items a .83)
  • Thoughts of turnover (3 items a .64)
  • Job Satisfaction (Based on Hackman Oldham,
    1975 Spector, 1985)
  • (23 items a .94)

12
Data Analysis
  • Moderated multiple regressions
  • Step 1 age
  • Step 2 role stressors
  • Step 3 non-traditional stressors
  • Step 4 individual moderator variable
  • Step 5 interaction terms (moderator by each
    stressor)
  • Hierarchical regression
  • To test the four requirements of a mediation
    relationship

13
Hierarchical Moderated Regression, Steps 1, 2,
and 3
p lt .001
14
Moderator Variables Organizational Commitment
p lt .001
15
Moderator Variable Perceived Organizational
Support
p lt .001
16
Moderator Variable - Voice
p lt .001
17
Lack of Moderator Effects
  • Possible reasons for lack of moderator effects
  • It may be due to relatively low levels of
    workplace stress.
  • The presence of moderating variables in the
    organization could have already effected a
    reduction in workplace stressors.
  • Or, there is no effect!

18
Job Satisfaction as Mediator
Job Satisfaction
.12
.56
Turnover Intentions
.18
Workplace stressors
.01
.08
.11
.09
.01
.15
Thoughts of Turnover
.18
Moderator variables
.18
.13
19
Future Research
  • Include more facets of workplace stressors (i.e.,
    not just role ambiguity and conflict), such as
    those used in this study.
  • Examine the effects of recruiting incentive
    policy on other job outcomes, such as long term
    retention of incentive beneficiaries.
  • Examine moderator effects in experimental,
    quasi-experimental, or through longitudinal
    designs.
  • Research including the construct of voice should
    ensure that being heard is included in the
    construct definition.

20
Practical Implications for Organizations and the
CF
  • Ensure that employees are not underemployed that
    training requirements match those needed for the
    position.
  • Ensure that organizations that offer recruiting
    incentives to new hires should conduct the
    suggested research prior to extending current
    policy.
  • Implement policies that enhance the perceptions
    of organizational support and that are receptive
    to employee suggestions and concerns.
About PowerShow.com