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Workshop on Giftedness: Realizing the Potential

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Title: Workshop on Giftedness: Realizing the Potential


1
Workshop on Giftedness Realizing the
Potential
  • 27.4.2006 (Thur)
  • Maggie Gibson

2
INTENDED OUTCOMES
  • Work through aspects of Giftedness Realising
    the Potential
  • Concept of giftedness
  • Characteristics of gifted students
  • Identification strategies
  • Programming options

3
  • CONCEPT OF GIFTEDNESS

4
What does gifted mean?
5
SPARTA 6th century BC
Boys - those identified physically superior
attended military school trained for
combat "defects" disposed of
6
CHINA - Tang Dynasty AD 618
Prodigies - girls and boys Differentiated
learning for "gifted" Reading memory
reasoning sensitivity
7
JAPAN 17th Century
Commoners loyalty obedience humility dilig
ence Elite Confucian
classics Martial Arts history
composition calligraphy moral
values etiquette
8
GALTON 1869
 INTELLIGENCE keenness of ones
senses vision audition reaction
time smell touch  
 natural selection and hereditary  
IDENTIFICATION visual / auditory acuity tactile
sensitivity reaction time  
  • GALTON 1869
  • INTELLIGENCE
  • keenness of one's senses
  • vision
  • audition
  • reaction time
  • smell
  • touch
  • natural selection and hereditary
  • IDENTIFICATION
  • visual / auditory acuity
  • tactile sensitivity
  • GALTON 1869
  • INTELLIGENCE
  • keenness of one's senses
  • vision
  • audition
  • reaction time
  • smell
  • touch
  • natural selection and hereditary
  • IDENTIFICATION
  • visual / auditory acuity
  • tactile sensitivity
  • GALTON 1869
  • INTELLIGENCE
  • keenness of one's senses
  • vision
  • audition
  • reaction time
  • smell
  • touch
  • natural selection and hereditary
  • IDENTIFICATION
  • visual / auditory acuity
  • tactile sensitivity

9
BINET and SIMON 1905
Commissioned to devise a test to identify
children who did not function as well in usual
school setting to develop appropriate
intervention programmes.
Test focused on ability to pay attention
memory judgement reasoning
comprehension Test score designated a Mental Age
top 1 GIFTED
Belief that children can grow in intelligence  

10
LEWIS A. TERMAN 1916
  • Godfather of gifted movement
  • Americanised Binet / Simon test Stanford Binet
    Test
  • Used Chronological Age CA and Mental Age MA to
    help determine Intelligence Quotient IQ ie
  • IQ MA / CA
  • Top 1 gifted

11
Concept of Giftedness Pre 1940s
Giftedness is the top one per cent of general
intellectual ability, as measured by the
StanfordBinet intelligence scale or a
comparable instrument.
12
  • 1957
  • USSR
  • First artificial satellite
  • Space race
  • Investigation into science education

13
United States Office Of Education (1972)
Gifted and talented children are those
identified by professionally qualified persons
as capable of high performance demonstrated by
achievement and/or potential ability in any of
the following areas, singly or in
combination General intellectual
ability Specific academic aptitude Creative
or productive thinking Leadership
ability Visual and performing arts
ability Psychomotor ability (manual dexterity
sport)
14
Gina Ginsberg (1977)
a little earlier a little faster and probably
a little differently from most other
children
15
Pre 1980s
  • Gifted identified as
  • successful, motivated individuals
  • showing exceptional ability / aptitude in
  • a specific domain or combination of domains.

16
Columbus Group(1991)
Giftedness is asynchronous development in which
advanced cognitive abilities and heightened
intensity combine to create inner experiences and
awareness that are qualitatively different from
the norm. This asynchrony increases with higher
intellectual capacity. This uniqueness of the
gifted renders them particularly vulnerable.
17
Françoys GAGNÉ2002
  • Giftedness possession of natural abilities or
    aptitudes at levels significantly beyond what
    might be expected for ones age.
  • outstanding potential rather than
    outstanding performance.
  • Talent achievement or performance at a level
    significantly beyond what might be expected at a
    given age.

18
TALENTS Fields relevant to school-age
youth ACADEMICS (language, science,) GAMES OF
STRATEGY (Clues, puzzles, video..) TECHNOLOGY (Me
chanics, computers..) ARTS ( Visual, drama,
music..) SOCIAL ACTION (Tutoring, school
politics..) BUSINESS (Sales, entrepreneurship..)
ATHLETICS SPORTS
GIFTEDNESS Aptitude domains INTELLECTUAL CREA
TIVE SOCIOAFFECTIVE SENSORIMOTOR OTHERS (
Extrasensory perception, gift of healing)
DEVELOPMENTAL PROCESS Learning - Training -
Practising
19
GIFTEDNESS
INTELLECTUAL DOMAIN Outstanding potential and/or
ability in areas that require mastery of a set of
formalised symbols, such as language, numbers or
both. Involves reasoning, memory making
judgements IQ scores, achievement scores and
academic scores reflect this type of giftedness
CREATIVE DOMAIN Outstanding potential or
achievement in areas that require open, original
and uniquely productive thinking or action. It
may be demonstrated through visual or performing
arts, in academic areas, business, politics, or
in the social arena. Involves inventiveness,
humor..
20
SOCIOAFFECTIVE DOMAIN Outstanding potential
and/or performance in the areas of social and
personal abilities. Involves leadership, empathy
and self-awareness.
SENSORIMOTOR DOMAIN Outstanding potential and/or
performance in activities requiring
large-muscles, small-muscle, and hand-eye
coordination. Involves strength, control,
endurance and flexibility.
  • OTHER
  • Extrasensory perception, gift of healing

21
  • IDENTIFICATION

22
PURPOSE OF IDENTIFICATION
  • Diagnose students level of functioning
    achievements, potential and level of giftedness
  • Determine students educational needs
  • Develop appropriate programmes
  • NOT LABELLING

23
Identification Measures
24
Parent Nomination
  • Most parents accurate in their assessment of
    their childs ability
  • Provides valuable information from settings
    outside school
  • May be unaware of their childs potential in
    relation to other children
  • Some under or over estimate their childs ability
  • May be reluctant to identify their childs
    advanced ability because of concerns regarding
    the attitude and perceptions of the school

25
Peer Nomination
  • More limited information available from young
    children but generally accurate
  • Peers may nominate students who appear to be
    underachieving
  • May nominate friends
  • May hide abilities because they are seeking
    acceptance by the desired peer group

26
Self Nomination
  • Usually accurate
  • Requires supportive approach to gain accurate
    information
  • Best in an interview situation
  • Some (particularly girls) will not self nominate
    over concerns with possible peer rejection
  • Interest inventories may provide useful
    information
  • Multiple Intelligence and learning styles
    inventories may be useful

27
Teacher Nomination
  • Sees student in a range of learning situations
    within the classroom and the wider school setting
  • Underachieving and unmotivated learners may be
    missed
  • Dependent on the challenge and rigour of the
    teaching and learning program
  • Misconceptions about giftedness can influence
    teachers observations and conclusions
  • Personal beliefs and attitudes, expectations and
    assumptions may influence observations
  • Accuracy of observation increased with teacher
    awareness of characteristics of gifted students

28
Identification Measures
29
OBJECTIVE / FORMAL QUANTITATIVE MEASURES
  • May require trained personnel to administer
  • Some pick up underachievers
  • May be culturally exclusive or exclude language
    disabled, ESL students
  • Identify achievements in particular area
  • Provide profiles of student strengths and
    weaknesses
  • Generally reliable predictors of academic success
    in school type tasks
  • Provide information on cognitive functioning to
    assist in placement and progression
  • Psychometric / IQ Tests, WPPSI III, WISC IV,
    Stanford Binet V
  • Teacher Made Tests specific Learning Area
  • Off level Tests 2-3 ahead of year
    level
  • Dynamic Test pretest-intervention-post
    test
  • Aptitude Test OLSAT
  • Standardised Tests Uni NSW Competitions, TORCH

30
  • CHARACTERISTICS

31
UNIVERSAL CHARACTERISTICS primary / secondary
students
  • Ask probing, provocative questions
  • See and create patterns and relationships between
    simple and complex concepts, concrete and
    abstract
  • Become passionately, deeply absorbed
  • Learn complex concepts quickly, easily
  • Reason beyond age peers
  • Retain large volume of information
  • Become frustrated with slow pace of work, when
    things are predictable
  • Show preference for independent work

32
  • Advanced vocabulary
  • Good sense of humor
  • Alert and observant
  • Individualistic
  • Self motivated, self-sufficient
  • Curious, wide range of interests

33
Task
Behaviours of gifted students in school setting
34
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35
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36
Task
Gifted or High Achiever?
37
(No Transcript)
38
(No Transcript)
39
  • PROGRAMMING

40
BLOOM'S TAXONOMY
  • Levels of Thinking

41
Original BLOOMS TAXONOMY
  • Knowledge
  • Comprehension
  • Application
  • Analysis
  • Synthesis
  • Evaluation

LOTS
Nouns

HOTS
1956
42
Revised BLOOMS TAXONOMY
  • Remember
  • Understand
  • Apply
  • Analyse
  • Evaluate
  • Create

Verbs
1990
43
DIVERGENT
COMPLEX
SYNTHESIS (create)




EVALUATION (evaluate)


ANALYSIS (analyse)



APPLICATION (apply)



COMPREHENSION (understand)


KNOWLEDGE (remember)
SIMPLE
CONVERGENT

44
KNOWLEDGE (remember)
45
COMPREHENSION (Understand)
46
APPLICATION (apply)
47
ANALYSIS (analyse)
48
EVALUATION (evaluate)
49
SYNTHESIS (create)
50
Knowledge (remember) Factual Knowledge Comprehens
ion (understand) Concept Knowledge Application
(apply) Procedural Knowledge Analysis
(analyse) Evaluation (evaluate) Synthesis
(create)

Metacognition
What do I think about this? What questions
should I be asking myself? Am I asking myself
enough questions? ..
51

Knowledge (remember) Comprehension
(understand) Application (apply)
Basics, Foundations Consumers

Manipulation Perspective Opinion Moving on
Analysis (analyse) Evaluation (evaluate) Synth
esis (create)
52
Relationship
Knowledge
Comprehension
Application
Analysis
Evaluation
Synthesis
53
Relationship
Knowledge
Comprehension
Application
Analysis
Evaluation
Synthesis
54
ANALYSIS (of elements)
SYNTHESIS (making predictions)
EVALUATION (making a judgement)
55
EVALUATION (applying criteria)
COMPREHENSION (of non-literal statements)
KNOWLEDGE (of definitions)
56
APPLICATION (providing examples)
ANALYSIS (of relationships)
COMPREHENSION (of explanations)
57
KNOWLEDGE (of facts)
SYNTHESIS (conveying ideas feelings)
APPLICATION (extrapolation)
58
DIVERGENT
3

SYNTHESIS
10
COMPLEX
4

EVALUATION
2
8

ANALYSIS
1
12

APPLICATION
7
6

COMPREHENSION
9
5
SIMPLE

KNOWLEDGE
11
CONVERGENT

59
Blooms ApplicationEXAMPLES
60
Reading Contract 1
61
10 points
3 points
8 points
8 points
12 points
20 points
62
OUR PLACE IN SPACE
  •  
  • Remember
  • Use at least 2 of the following sites as well as
    your own resources to compile a list of 20 facts
    about our universe.
  •  
  • OR
  • Complete the Planets Facts sheet. Use excel or
    graphs to show differences between some features
    of these planets.
  •  

63
  • Understand
  • Develop a Travel Diary to explain what an
    astronaut would see and experience if he/she
    travelled past 10 features of our universe.
  •  
  • OR
  • Develop a glossary that explains and illustrates
    10 features of our universe.
  •  
  • OR
  • Design a computer game or website that would
    teach the player / viewer facts about our
    universe.
  •  
  • OR
  • Carry out research on Black Holes to prepare and
    present an oral presentation for your peers.
  •  
  • OR
  • What is a galaxy, how is it formed, where it is
    found..? What is so special about the Milky Way?
  •  
  •  

64
  • APPLY
  • Complete the following work sheets to prepare and
    present a practical demonstration for your
    peers. Light and Lighter and Planet Facts.
  •  
  • OR
  • Complete the Night Sky work sheet.
  •  
  • OR
  • Create a timeline to show how the universe has
    developed over time

65
  • ANALYSE
  • Complete the Taking Pictures in Space work
    sheet. Present your picture with an explanation
    of the process you used to get this final
    product.
  •  
  • OR
  • Use a Venn Diagram to compare and contrast
    attributes/properties/features of Earth with 2
    other planets in our Solar System.
  •  
  • OR
  • Complete the Tides work sheet. Use the
    information from this sheet to explain the
    consequences if the tide didnt happen.
  •  

66
  • You are the leader of a scientific team going to
    carry out investigations on Mercury. Which of the
    following items would / wouldnt you take with
    you to help carry out your work, to relax and
    survive for the next 3 months? You may wish to
    use the following table to record you point of
    view

67
  • EVALUATE
  •  
  • Complete the Technology and Space work sheet.
    Use the information to present arguments for and
    against their value / benefits to humans.
  •  
  • OR
  • Use diagrams and labels to explain what an
    eclipse is. Explain why some people, just like
    primitive people from the past, are still afraid
    of an eclipse.
  •  
  • OR
  • (a) Research and explain what the Big Splash is
    about. (b) Interview at least 4 adults to
    determine whether people believe this theory,
    explaining why / why not.
  •  
  • OR
  • How does spending billions of dollars on Space
    exploration benefit the global community? Present
    arguments for and against this spending.
  •  

68
  • CREATE
  • Select and investigate a gaseous planet from our
    solar system. Use this information to design a
    space pod that would allow a NASA team to carry
    out experiments on that planet. Your design must
    include labels and explanations to highlight
    aspects of your design.
  •  
  • OR
  • Produce a Travel Brochure advertising a holiday
    at the Saturn Hilton or Venus Hilton. Elaborate
    on what you would see, what you would do for
    sport and relaxation, how you would get there,
    how much it would cost Use travel brochures from
    a travel agent to develop a checklist of features
    your brochure must include.

69
  • KNOWLEDGE
  • Provide 5 examples of polygons and 5 examples of
    polyhedra
  • Find examples o the following polyhedra in daily
    life..

70
  • COMPREHENSION
  • Explain where the names for polygons and
    polyhedra come from?
  • Provide explanations for polygons and polyhedra

71
  • Use resource 36.S.97 to construct the irregular
    polyhedra.
  • Create a flow chart for the following polyhedra-
    cube, square prism, tetrahedron, octahedron and
    icosahedron.
  • Sort the following objects into polyhedra or
    polygons..
  • Use Eulers Rule to show the relationship
    between features of polyhedra. Provide 4 examples
  • Use the isometric graph paper to draw 2 simple
    polyhedra and 2 complex polyhedra

72
  • ANALYSIS
  • What are the similarities and differences
    between - the Great Pyramid of Giza, the Great
    Cheops, Khephren, Mykerenos and Quetzalcoatl?
  • What is an Acoustic Chamber? What polyhedra are
    commonly used in one, why?
  • What is the importance of angles in the
    construction of polyhedra? Provide examples where
    appropriate.
  • What is the relationship between polygons and
    polyhedra?
  • Polyhedra are found in the world of molecules.
    Which polyhedra do you find in Methane? What
    other polyhedra do we find in other molecules?
  • Which is the most common polyhedra found in the
    built environment? Why is this so? Provide
    examples.

73
  • SYNTHESIS
  • Polyhedra are often used in modern art/
    sculptures. For example - Cubi series by David
    Smith. Create and present either a drawing or
    sculpture that uses polyhedra.
  • Create a challenging fitness course for a gymnast
    using a range of polyhedra. Explain why you
    selected these polyhedra and how they would
    benefit the gymnast

74
Activity
  • Brainstorm all the possible causes for a tooth
    falling out.
  • Categorise your ideas
  • Fill in the Fishbone

75
  • Over which causes do we as human have some
    control?

76
  • EVALUATION
  • Which is the more rigid square prism or
    triangular prism? Present reasons for your
    decision.

77
Application- Your school
  • Class topics / themes / concepts students have
    worked on or will be working on
  • How could you use the Fishbone?
  • What is the relationship with the Fishbone and
    Blooms Taxonomy?

78
S C U M P S
79
S
IZE
Is size important to the design? Could it be
smaller, larger, wider.?
80
C
olour
Does the choice of colour make a
difference? Could it have been darker, lighter?
81
U
ses
What is it used for? Could it have other uses?
82
M
aterials
What is it made out of? Is the choice in
materials important to the design and
function? Could other materials been used?
83
P
arts
List the individual parts. What are these parts
for? How important are they to the whole design?
84
S
hape
Is shape important to this design? Could other
shapes been used? Why, why not?
85
TASK
Use SCUMPS to analyse the invention
86
Design Brief   Context Statement You have been
asked by a computer furniture company to design a
new chair that can be packed up and carried away
by the owner. It should include facilities to
store the owners disks and CDs. Ideally, it
should be lightweight or be able to be pulled
along to protect the owners back, and be
sufficiently attractive to encourage the public
to buy it.   Task use the BAR Key and SCUMPS to
come up with your new design. Draw a picture/
diagram to show what it looks like and label all
parts.   Restrictions You have 15 min to
complete your draft. You must clearly show what
has been made BIGGER, ADDED TO, and REPLACED
from the original design, and its SIZE, COLOUR,
the various PARTS of the design , what MATERIALS
will be used for the various parts and the
overall ergonomic SHAPE Evaluation Share your
design with your group, explaining its design.
Your group will evaluate your design using PMI.  
87
S C U M P S
  • S
  • C
  • U
  • M
  • P
  • S

Size Why this size?
Colour Why this colour?
Uses What are its uses?
Materials Why these materials?
Parts Why these parts?
Shape Why this shape?
Langrehr, J, 1994
88
Application- Your school
  • How could you use SCUMPS?
  • What is the relationship with SCUMPS and Blooms
    Taxonomy?

89
CONSIDERATIONS
  • What are your Intended Outcomes?
  • How will these strategies hence students
    thinking so that they are more critical,
    analytical and creative?
  • Use the strategies to support your teaching and
    learning activities.
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