Greater Miami Society - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Greater Miami Society PowerPoint presentation | free to download - id: 12a0c-N2RkN



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Greater Miami Society

Description:

Almost 3 in 10 workers entering the workforce today will become disabled before retiring ... and keep hands, cigarettes and food away from your mouth when ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:189
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 48
Provided by: eladio4
Learn more at: http://www.gmshrm.org
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Greater Miami Society


1
  • Greater Miami Society
  • For Human Resources
  • Management
  • Tuesday, June 3rd, 2008
  • The Business Argument for Focusing on Abilities
  • Not Disabilities
  • Presented by Eladio Amores

2
(No Transcript)
3
Interesting Statistics
  • 54 million people in the U.S. have a disability
    or 19 of the population
  • 2.2 million in Florida
  • A person suffers a disabling work injury every
    nine seconds (National Safety Council 2004)
  • Almost 3 in 10 workers entering the workforce
    today will become disabled before retiring
  • Over 900 different conditions (unique to the
    individual)

4
  • Employees with disabilities have been shown to
    have the same absentee and sick rates as
    temporary able body employees
  • Since 2000 the number of disabled workers in
    America has increased by 35 according to the SSA
  • Chances are that most organizations (know it or
    not), currently have employees with disabilities
  • Chances are good that with our aging workforce
    many more employers will have an employee with a
    disability on staff in the future

5
Benefits of Hiring People with Disabilities
Equal or Higher Job Performance Added
Diversity Higher Retention Market
Attraction Low Absenteeism Greater
Motivation Tax Credits WOTC
6
(No Transcript)
7
(No Transcript)
8
Avoiding Litigation - Know the LawADA Definition
  • A person with a physical or mental impediment
  • Has a record of such impediment
  • Or is regarded as having a physical or mental
    impediment

9
Americans with Disabilities Act
  • ADA defines a disability as a
  • physical or mental impairment that
  • substantially limits one or more of major life
    activity such as seeing, hearing, speaking,
    walking, caring for
  • oneself and breathing

10
Qualified Person
  • A qualified person meets the employers
    requirements, such as experience, educational
    background, etc. for a particular job
  • A qualified person is able to perform the
    essential functions of the job with or without an
    accommodation (without causing undue hardship for
    the employer)

11
Americans with Disabilities Act
  • Job discrimination against qualified people with
    disabilities is illegal
  • No quota action obligations
  • Must provide reasonable accommodations that
    permit a qualified applicant or employee with a
    disability to participate in a job application
    process or/and to perform the essential functions
    of a job

12
Reasonable Accommodations
  • Examples of accommodations
  • Making existing facilities accessible
  • Job restructuring
  • Part-time or modified work
  • schedules
  • Providing assistive technology (AT)

Source http//www.cacp.gatech.edu/Presentations/G
TC_2005/GTC2005.pdf
13
Reasonable Accommodations
  • Changes or adjustments that do not present undue
    hardships for the employer
  • Most accommodations are inexpensive
  • and easy to make, less than 500 on the average
  • The vast majority of workers with disabilities do
    not require accommodations

14
Undue Hardship
  • SIGNIFICANT DIFFICULTY OR EXPENSE
  • FINANCIAL DIFFICULTY
  • UNDULY EXTENSIVE
  • SUBSTANTIAL DISRUPTIVE
  • ALTER NATURE OR OPERATION Of BUSINESS
  • CASE-BY-CASE

15
  • ADA does not contain a list of medical conditions
    that constitute disabilities
  • Employers with 15 or more must comply
  • Disability claims are rare, 91 of employers had
    no ADA complaints
  • People with Disabilities want jobs
  • not lawsuits

16
Myths and Facts
  • ADA is not an affirmative action statute
  • No preferential treatment required
  • merely on account of the employees disability
  • Accommodations which require special
    dispensations and preferential treatment may not
    be reasonable under ADA

17
Employment Practices Under ADA Rules
  • Recruiting
  • Interviewing
  • Training
  • Leave
  • Layoff
  • Benefits
  • Firing
  • Promoting
  • Job assignment
  • Pay

18
Recruiting and Interviewing
19
Disability Issues- Employer Tips
  • Dos and Don'ts when interacting with applicants
    with disabilities
  • Do not focus on a disability unless it is
    necessary
  • Do not portray people with disabilities who
    succeed as superhuman

20
Common Courtesies
  • Make appropriate contact with an individual with
    a disability
  • (according to the situation as you would with
    anyone else, e.g., a handshake or arm around the
    shoulder)

21
Common Courtesies
  • Offer assistance to an individual with a
    disability
  • But wait until your offer is accepted before you
    help
  • Do not assume you know the best way of helping -
    listen to any instructions given
  • Do not make assumptions
  • About the existence or absence of disabilities -
    some people have hidden disabilities, e.g.
    epilepsy, diabetes, asthma

22
Common Courtesies
  • Talk directly to the individual with disability
    person
  • Rather than through a companion
  • Relax and make eye contact
  • Do not be embarrassed about
  • using common expressions
  • Such as see you later or Ive got to run,
    which may relate to a persons disability

23
Watch your Language
  • It is important to gain a general understanding
    of words and phrases which may offend people with
    disabilities
  • There are no hard and fast rules

24
Disability Language
  • Many individuals with a disability find the word
    handicapped offensive as it carries
    connotations of cap in hand
  • Instead, say person with a disability or
    individual with a disability
  • Medical labels are undesirable and often
    misleading, as no two people are alike, they say
    little about people as individuals

25
Disability Language
  • Do say wheelchair user or person who uses a
    wheelchair
  • Do not say wheelchair bound or describe someone
    as confined to a wheelchair
  • Remember that a wheelchair can represent freedom
    to its user

26
Disability Language
  • Do say individual with a disability or person
    with a disability
  • Do not say invalid (this can be construed as
    not valid)
  • Do not equate illness with disability

27
Meeting People with Mobility Limitations
  • When talking to a person in a wheelchair try to
    put yourself at their eye level, i.e., sit in a
    chair rather than remain standing
  • Do not grab the back of someones wheelchair to
    push them along
  • Wheelchair users can get around under their own
    power

28
Meeting People with Mobility Limitations
  • Leaning on a persons wheelchair is similar to
    leaning on a person and is disrespectful and
    annoying the chair is part of a persons personal
    body space
  • Do not touch/remove a persons mobility aid
    without the persons consent, for example
    crutches

29
Meeting People with Mobility Limitations
  • If a person with a mobility difficulty is
    attending a meeting or interview, check the
    following
  • Are there suitable parking arrangements?
  • Is there a ramp or step-free entrance?
  • Are there suitable toilet facilities?
  • Is reception alerted to provide assistance?

30
Meeting People with Vision Impairments
  • Identify yourself clearly and introduce anyone
    else who is present, including their relative
    position to you
  • When offering assistance to a person with a
    visual difficulty, ask them if they would like
    assistance and how you can help

31
Meeting People with Vision Impairments
  • When guiding a person with a visual difficulty,
    give him/her clear instructions, e.g., This is a
    step up or step down - not merely a step
  • When offering a seat, place the persons hand on
    the back or arm of the chair
  • During a group conversation refer to the person
    you are talking to by his/her name

32
Meeting People with Vision Impairments
  • Do not leave someone talking to an empty space
  • Inform them when you are ending a conversation
    or departing
  • In welcoming a person who is visually impaired to
    a room they have not been
  • in before, give a brief synopsis of the
    geography (shape, size, windows)
  • and contents (furniture and people) of the room

33
Disability Language
  • Say he/she is deaf/hard of hearing, or he/she
    is blind/has a vision difficulty
  • NEVER say deaf and dumb
  • Remember that there are differing levels of
    deafness and blindness

34
Meeting People Hard of Hearingor with a Hearing
Impairment
  • When meeting a person who
  • reads lips
  • Look directly at them and speak slowly and
    clearly
  • Do not shout or exaggerate lip movements as this
    will distort understanding
  • Speak with facial expressions, gestures and body
    movements which emphasize the words you use (only
    3 out of 10 words are visible on the lips)

35
Meeting People with Hearing Impairments
  • Do not make assumptions about a persons mode of
    communication
  • Always ascertain method of communication the
    individual prefers
  • to use
  • If a sign language interpreter is working with a
    person who is deaf, always face and speak to the
    individual

36
Meeting People with Hearing Impairments
  • When speaking to an individual who is deaf or
    hard of hearing, remember not to shout
  • Facial expressions and gestures help individuals
    who are deaf to understand you, face the source
    of light and keep hands, cigarettes and food away
    from your mouth when speaking

37
Meeting People with Hearing Impairments
  • To obtain the attention of an individual who is
    deaf, tap him/her on the shoulder or wave
  • Do not shout
  • If you are with an individual who is deaf, and
    the telephone rings or someone knocks on the
    door, tell the individual, then excuse yourself
    and answer the phone/door

38
Meeting People with Hearing Impairments
  • In group conversation, inform the individual who
    is deaf what the topic is so he/she can
    contribute
  • Hearing aids amplify ALL sounds so attempt to
    keep excess noise to a minimum

39
Social Responsibility and Corporate Citizenship
Programs
40
Resources

Florida
Vocational Rehabilitation
www.fljobconnections.com
Able Trust
www.floridabln.org
Job Accommodations Network
www.jan.wvu.edu/soar

41
Resources
42
(No Transcript)
43
Conclusions
  • Any one of us, can become a person with a
    disability
  • Always treat others as they would want to be
    treated
  • Each individual is unique
  • The word normal has no real meaning if we are
    all different

44
We could learn a lot from crayons
Some are sharp, some are pretty and some are
dull, Some have rare names, and all different
colors, but they all have to live in the same
box!!
45
Closing Thought
  • Accept Difference
  • Value Difference
  • Teach Difference
  • Till Difference Doesnt
  • Make a Difference

46
(No Transcript)
47

Eladio Amores Corporate Consultant Florida
Department of Education Division of Vocational
Rehabilitation
941-359-7811 Eladio.Amores_at_vr.fldoe.org www.fljo
bconnections.com
About PowerShow.com