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Globalization 3.0: Why Career Clusters Matter More Than Ever

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Title: Globalization 3.0: Why Career Clusters Matter More Than Ever


1
Globalization 3.0Why Career Clusters Matter
More Than Ever!
By Hans Meeder Presented to 2006 Career Clusters
Conference June 2006
2
Key Points for Discussion
  • The Change Drivers
  • Designing a 21st century model
  • College-Readiness AND Work-Readiness for ALL
    students
  • The Role and Value of Career Clusters/Pathways

3
(No Transcript)
4
Change Driver 1The Shifting Global Landscape
5
The World is Flat A brief History of the 21st
Century by Thomas L. Friedman
6
Globalization
  • Version 1.0. 1492 (Columbus) - 1800.
  • Key factors-- muscle, horsepower, windpower,
    steampower
  • Agent of change -- Countries and governments
  • Version 2.0. 1800 to 2000
  • slowed by Great Depression and World Wars I and
    II
  • key factors falling transportation costs, and
    later, by falling telecommunications costs
    telegraph, telephones, the PC, satellites,
    fiber-optic cable, and early version of the
    Internet.

Source The World is Flat, A brief History of
the 21st Century by Thomas L. Friedman
7
Globalization
  • Version 3.0. 2000 to present
  • Key factors-- power for individuals to
    collaborate and compete globally. Software,
    applications, global fiber-optic network
  • Agent of change -- Individuals, much more
    diverse --- non-Western, non-white

Source The World is Flat, A brief History of
the 21st Century by Thomas L. Friedman
8
Friedmans ten flattening forces
  • 1. Fall of the Berlin WallThe events of
    November 9, 1989, tilted the worldwide balance of
    power toward democracies and free markets.
  • 2. Netscape IPOThe August 9, 1995, offering
    sparked massive investment in fiber-optic cables.
  • 3. Work flow software The rise of apps from
    PayPal to VPNs enabled faster, closer
    coordination among far-flung employees.
  • 4. Open-sourcing Self-organizing communities, à
    la Linux, launched a collaborative revolution.
  • 5. Outsourcing Migrating business functions to
    India saved money and a third world economy.

Source The World is Flat, A brief History of
the 21st Century by Thomas L. Friedman Wired
Magazine, May 2005
9
Friedmans ten flattening forces
  • 6. Offshoring Contract manufacturing elevated
    China to economic prominence.
  • 7. Supply-chaining Robust networks of suppliers,
    retailers, and customers increased business
    efficiency. See Wal-Mart.
  • 8. Insourcing Logistics giants took control of
    customer supply chains, helping mom-and-pop shops
    go global. See UPS and FedEx.
  • 9. In-forming Power searching allowed everyone
    to use the Internet as a "personal supply chain
    of knowledge." See Google.
  • 10. Wireless Like "steroids," wireless
    technologies pumped up collaboration, making it
    mobile and personal.

Source The World is Flat, A brief History of
the 21st Century by Thomas L. Friedman Wired
Magazine, May 2005
10
(No Transcript)
11
Percentage of population with a postsecondary
credential
The International Education Race
55-64
45-54
35-44
25-34
Education at a Glance OECD Indicators 2003
12
The International Education Race
Students Enrolled in Postsecondary (in thousands)
UNESCO, 2003
13
So what about China and India?
14
So what about China and India?
  • 2 nations with 1/3 of global population
  • Exponential economic growth during the last 20
    years --9.5 in China, 6 in India
  • China has largest of cell phone users, 350
    million, projected to be 600 million in 2009.
  • By 2007, China will have more broadband internet
    access than the U.S.
  • China -- mass manufacturing powerhouse
  • India strength in design, services, and
    precision industry

15
Offshoring and Outsourcing
  • McKinsey Global Institute estimates that 9.6
    million U.S. services jobs could be sent offshore
    today (theoretically), 4m jobs more likely.
  • Some industries changed beyond recognition.
  • Outsourcing
  • 49 of packaged software worldwide
  • 44 of infotech services
  • 25 of worldwide banking jobs
  • 19 of insurance jobs
  • 13 of pharmaceutical jobs
  • 52 of engineering jobs
  • 31 of accounting jobs

16
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17
Strengths and Challenges
CHINA
INDIA
  • 1-child policy limits population growth to 1b,
    then a graying population to reach 300m by
    2025.
  • Strong infrastructure with centralized
    coordination and planning.
  • Growing political backlash against authoritarian
    control.
  • High growth needed to avoid increased unemployment
  • Population to grow to 1.6b by 2050.
  • More efficient with capital than China.
  • English speaking, friendly toward the U.S. and
    its citizens, more democratic and open society.
  • Very undeveloped infrastructure power and
    transportation
  • Red-tape, bureaucracy and corruption
  • Bottlenecks in high quality training
  • High growth needed to avoid increased
    unemployment

18
Overstating the Risk?
  • Popular wisdom? In engineering, China's
    graduates will number over 600,000, India's
    350,000, America's only about 70,000. (Fortune,
    August 2005)
  • Reality United States annually produces 137,437
    engineers with at least a bachelor's degree while
    India produces 112,000 and China 351,537. That's
    more U.S. degrees per million residents than in
    either other nation. (Duke University Analysis,
    December 2005, Gerald Bracey, Washington Post,
    May 21, 2006 )

19
Getting used to the new neighbors
  • But the U.S. and other established powers will
    have to learn to make room for China and India.
  • Business Week, August 2005

20
Change Driver 2The DemographicChallenge
21
Demand for a Skilled Workforce
Variable 1 46 million baby boomers with some
college, nearing retirement
Variable 2 49 new workforce entrants with some
college.
Variable 3 Net gain of 3 million in workforce
with some college.
Variable 6 Impact of Flat World
---digitization, offshoring, and outsourcing.
Variable 4 15 million jobs by 2020 requiring
college educated workers.
Variable 5 Net shortage of 12 million U.S.
skilled workers by 2020.
Source Carvnevale and Desrochers, The Missing
Middle Aligning Education and the Knowledge
Economy
22
Change Driver 3Indicators of an Outmoded
Preparation System
23
High School Achievment -- FLAT
24
African American and Latino 17 Year Olds Read at
Same Levels as White 13 Year Olds
Source Source NAEP 1999 Long Term Trends
Summary Tables (online)
25
12th Grade Reading2 in 3 students are not
proficient in Reading.
66
62
Source U.S. Department of Education 2003,
Prepared by Alliance for Excellent Education
26
What Are the Results?What happens to entering
9th graders four years later
37 Graduate from High School Not College-Ready
29 Dropout of High School
34 Graduate from High School College-Ready
Greene Winters 2005
27
What Are the Results?Low reading skills lead to
low achievement.
  • Every year, 1.3 million students do not graduate
    with their peers. That means, every school day
    we lose 7,000 students.
  • Nationally, 29 of students do not graduate on
    time.
  • 68 of high school students graduate unprepared
    for college. And 53 of college students enroll
    in remedial courses.

Swanson 2004 Greene Winters 2005 NCES 2001.
28
Employers/Instructors Dissatisfied With High
Schools Skills Prep
(In each area, saying they are somewhat/very
dissatisfied with the job public high schools
are doing preparing graduates)
Employers
25 very dissatisfied 22 very dissatisfied 24
very dissatisfied 20 very dissatisfied
Reading/understandingcomplicated
materials Quality of writing that is
expected Doing research Mathematics Oral
communication/public speaking Science
Source Hart Research Associates, Achieve,
Rising to the Challenge, Jan. 2005
29
Employers/Instructors Dissatisfied With High
Schools Skills Prep
(In each area, saying they are somewhat/very
dissatisfied with the job public high schools
are doing preparing graduates)
Employers
Thinking analytically Work and study
habits Applying what is learned in school to
solving problems Computer skills
29 very dissatisfied 22 very dissatisfied16
very dissatisfied 17 very dissatisfied
Source Hart Research Associates, Achieve,
Rising to the Challenge, Jan. 2005
30
An obsolete system?
American high schools are obsolete. By
obsolete, I mean that our high schools, even when
they are working exactly as designed, cannot
teach our kids what they need to know today.
Training the workforce of tomorrow with high
schools of today is like trying to teach kids
about todays computers on a 50-year-old
mainframe. Its the wrong tool for the
times. -- Bill Gates, Founder and Chairman,
Microsoft Corp.
31
Miscalculations in the 20th century high school
model
? Belief in fixed intelligence and low
expectations, racial and ethnic prejudices ?
Belief in a static economy and slow-changing
workforce demands
32
Designing a 21st century modelCollege
Readiness AND Work Readiness
33
The Changing U.S. Workforce
Skilled 20
Unskilled 15
Unskilled 60
Skilled 65
Professional 20
Professional 20
1950
1997
National Summit on 21st Century Skills for 21st
Century Jobs
34
Fastest Growing Jobs Require Some Education
Beyond High School
35
In todays workforce, jobs require more education
than ever before
Change in the distribution of education in
jobs 1973 v. 2001
-9
-23
16
16
Source Carnevale, Anthony P. and Donna M.
Desrochers, Standards for What? The Economic
Roots of K16 Reform, ETS, 2003. CREATED BY
ACHIEVE, INC.
36
American Diploma Project
  • Successful preparation for both postsecondary
    education and employment requires learning the
    same rigorous English and mathematics content and
    skills. No longer do students planning to go to
    work after high school need a different and less
    rigorous curriculum than those planning to go to
    college.

37
American Diploma Project Network22 States as of
September 2005
Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Delaware, Georgia,
Idaho, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland,
Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Mississippi,
New Jersey, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma,
Oregon, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Texas
38
ADP Network Priorities
1. Raise high school standards to the level of
what is actually required to succeed in college
or in the workforce. 2. Require all students to
take rigorous college and work-ready
curriculum. 3. Develop tests of college and work
readiness that all students will take in high
school. 4. Hold high schools accountable for
graduating all students ready for college and
work, and hold colleges accountable for the
success of the students they admit.
39
Career Pathways and the Reauthorization of the
Perkins Vocational and Technical Education Act
  • Encourage linkages between high schools and
    postsecondary institutions.
  • Includes a challenging academic core.
  • Offers non-duplicative career and technical
    courses leading to degree or certificate.
  • Focuses on career pathways that are in-demand and
    lead to economic self-sufficiency.
  • Each local grant recipient operates at least one
    career pathway program.
  • State helps develop and approves career pathways.

40
Strengthening a New Vision for the American High
School Through the Experiences and Resources of
Career and Technical Education Available at
www.acteonline.org
41
9 Key Recommendations
  • 1. Establish a Clear System Goal of Career and
    College Readiness for All Students
  • 2. Create a Positive School Culture that Stresses
    Personalization in Planning and Decision-Making
  • 3. Create a Positive School Culture that Stresses
    Personalization in Relationships
  • 4. Dramatically Improve How and Where Academic
    Content is Taught
  • 5. Create Incentives for Students to Pursue the
    Core Curriculum in an Interest-based Context
    (see the 8 elements of an interest-based program)

42
9 Key Recommendations
  • 6. Support High Quality Teaching in all Content
    Areas
  • 7. Offer Flexible Learning Opportunities to
    Encourage Re-Entry and Completion
  • 8. Create System Incentives and Supports for
    Connection of CTE and High School Redesign
    Efforts
  • 9. Move Beyond Seat-Time and Narrowly Defined
    Knowledge and Skills

43
8 Key Elements of Interest-Based Programs
  • 1. Rigorous career and college readiness
    academic program for all students
  • 2. Research-based literacy and mathematics
    interventions for struggling students.
  • 3. Structured and integrated Career exploration
    /development and college planning services
    (electronic tools where possible)
  • 4. Interest-based programming beginning in ninth
    grade (concurrent with remediation for struggling
    students)
  • 5. Advanced placement and dual enrollment
    opportunities.
  • 6. Challenging project-based learning and
    capstone projects that integrate learning from
    multiple disciplines and leadership development
  • 7. Internships. mentoring and work-based
    learning and
  • 8. Use of industry-recognized standards and
    certifications and externally validated
    curriculum frameworks.

44
Why we need Career Clusters and Pathways
  • In a new global context, Americas preparation
    system must be highly effective and efficient,
    reaching ALL students with high quality.
  • As the pace of change quickens, education must
    emphasize flexible career preparation, not narrow
    job training.
  • Embedded college preparatory options will appeal
    to a broad array of students, including those who
    consider themselves college-bound.
  • They provide opportunity for students to master
    academic content by applying it to real-world
    contexts, a skill that is valuable in the
    high-skilled workplace.
  • They create stronger personal motivation for
    students to complete high school and work toward
    academic achievement.

45
I got you the iPod that I promised you, and for
your convenience, Ive welded it to the lawn
mower.
46
Points to Ponder
  • In a new global context, Americas preparation
    system must be highly effective and efficient,
    reaching ALL students with high quality education
    and training.
  • With our relative size and formidable
    competitors/partners, the U.S. cannot afford to
    leave any child or youth behind.
  • As a society, we will only survive and thrive in
    the 21st century with high schools designed for
    the 21st century.
  • High School Redesign is a journey, not a
    destination.

47
Globalization 3.0Why Career Clusters Matter
More Than Ever!
By Hans Meeder meederh_at_visions-unltd.com
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