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Commitments of the Shepherd

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... about the pastors in the Synod and their need for pastoral ethics? ... 'Synod' means ' ... Structure of the Synod. Commission on Theology and Church Relations ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Commitments of the Shepherd


1
Commitments of the Shepherd
2
Commitments of the Shepherd
  • The document begins by stating that there is a
    need for some sort of principles of conduct.
  • What does this say about the pastors in the Synod
    and their need for pastoral ethics?

3
Commitments of the Shepherd
  • The document states that People's expectations
    of pastors have grown quantitatively and
    qualitatively. The biblical models and
    descriptions of who a pastor is to be and what he
    is to do are being seriously questioned, or, if
    not questioned, are being expanded by demanding
    parishioners.

4
Commitments of the Shepherd
  • Ministerial roles1934
  • Teacher
  • Preacher
  • Worship leader
  • Pastor
  • Administrator
  • (Brown and May)

5
Commitments of the Shepherd
  • Ministerial roles1980
  • All of the above, plus
  • Open and affirming style
  • Know how to foster friendship
  • Aware of denominational activities
  • Provide witness against world injustice
  • (David Schuller)

6
Commitments of the Shepherd
  • Ministerial roles1986
  • All of the above, plus
  • Planning ability
  • Worship facilitator
  • Sensitive to the congregation
  • Spiritual development for the congregation

7
Commitments of the Shepherd
  • Ministerial roles1986
  • All of the above, plus
  • Pastoral Counseling
  • Development of Stewardship
  • Volunteer coordinator
  • Developing world mission
  • (Hartford Seminary Center for Social and
    Religious Research)

8
Commitments of the Shepherd
  • Notice that the no longer are pastors called upon
    to be brokers of the truthor even
    theologians!as much as technocrats doing a
    specific duty.
  • What kind of pressures do you think this
    ever-expanding list of pastoral roles has on
    pastors and their congregations?
  • What type of response does this call for on
    behalf of the Church at large?

9
Commitments of the Shepherd
  • The first four topics
  • Commitment to Self and Personal Spiritual Growth
  • Commitment to Spouse and Family
  • Commitment to Congregation
  • Commitment to the Wider Church
  • What does this list say about the priorities that
    the Council of Presidents thinks we should have
    as pastors and Church workers?
  • Which of these do you find the most difficult?

10
Commitments of the Shepherd
  • Section 3 B asks the question, Should the pastor
    have friends in the congregation? What is your
    answer to that question.

11
Commitments of the Shepherd
  • Section 5 is entitled Appropriate Social
    Behavior But the section mostly deals with
    adultery, pornography, and homosexuality.
  • In what way is this a realistic issue for
    churches and church workers today?
  • How can pastors work to protect and help
    themselves in these issues? How can the churches
    work to protect their pastors and the
    congregation?

12
Commitments of the Shepherd
  • 5E talks about engaging in non-sinful behavior,
    which might still cause offense. How might a
    pastor and congregation deal with these kinds of
    situations?

13
Commitments of the Shepherd
  • Are there any other issues in this document that
    jump out at you that you would like to discuss?

14
Allies and Mentors Along the Way
15
Allies and Mentors Along the Way
  • "Synod" means "walking together"
  • We are a group of pastors and churches who have
    made an agreement, a covenant of love, to walk
    together.

16
Allies and Mentors Along the Way
  • Ideally, we serve each other as allies and
    mentors.
  • The Elders and leadership of your congregation.
  • Brother pastors and other church workers.
  • District Presidents

17
Allies and Mentors Along the Way
  • Structure of the Synod
  • Commission on Theology and Church Relations
  • Commission on Worship
  • The Seminaries
  • lnternet lists Lutheran Pastoral Theology (Yahoo
    Groups)

18
Allies and Mentors in Conflict
  • Acts 15

19
Allies and Mentors in Conflict Acts 15
  • The issue the relationship between Jews and
    Gentiles

20
Allies and Mentors in Conflict Acts 15
  • The question What is the Gospel?
  • Some of them were teaching the necessity of being
    circumcised for complete acceptance by God.
  • Their teaching was based on God's Word Genesis
    179-14
  • Their teaching also flowed from their heritage of
    Judaism

21
Allies and Mentors in Conflict Acts 15
  • In response Paul and his associates asked the
    same question What is the Gospel?
  • They based their arguments on experience
  • and on Scripture.

22
Allies and Mentors in Conflict Acts 15
  • When they met there was a huge debate.
  • When they met there was a huge debate among
    brothers.
  • When they met there was a huge debate among
    brothers led by teachers in the church.

23
Allies and Mentors in Conflict Acts 15
  • When they met there was a huge debate among
    brothers led by teachers in the church and they
    came to agreement

24
Allies and Mentors in Conflict Acts 15
  • When they met there was a huge debate among
    brothers led by teachers in the church and they
    came to agreement and they asked the Gentiles to
    make concessions for the sake of the mission.

25
Allies and Mentors in Conflict Acts 15
  • The goal was not to enable contact between Jewish
    and Gentile Christians.
  • The goal was to enable missions among the Jews to
    go forward.

26
Allies and Mentors in Conflict
  • Peacemaker Seminar

27
Peacemaker Seminar
  • What is conflict?
  • Conflict is a difference in opinion or purpose
    that frustrates someone's goals or desires.

28
Peacemaker Seminar
  • Conflict comes from
  • Misunderstanding
  • Differences in values, goals, gifts, calling,
    priorities, expectations, interests, or opinions.
  • Competition over limited resources.
  • Actions that lead to other sinful words and
    actions.

29
The Slippery Slope
30
Peacemaker Seminar
  • The Slippery Slope
  • Escape responses are used when people are more
    interested in avoiding a conflict than in
    resolving it.

31
Peacemaker Seminar
  • The Slippery Slope
  • Attack responses are used by people who are more
    interested in winning a conflict than in
    preserving a relationship.

32
Peacemaker Seminar
  • The Slippery Slope
  • Conciliation responses seek a Biblical answer to
    the dispute.

33
Peacemaker Seminar
  • The Slippery Slope
  • Escape focuses on me.
  • Attack on you.
  • Conciliation on us.

34
Peacemaker Seminar
  • The Four Gs of Conflict
  • Glorify God
  • How can I please and honor the Lord in this
    situation?
  • Get the Log Out!
  • How have I contributed to this situation?

35
Peacemaker Seminar
  • The Four Gs of Conflict
  • Gently Restore.
  • How can I help others to understand how they have
    contributed to this conflict so that we can be
    restored to each other?
  • Go and be Reconciled
  • How can I demonstrate forgiveness and encourage a
    reasonable solution to this conflict?

36
Peacemaker Seminar
  • These principles all flow from the One G the
    Gospel.
  • We respond to the peace that God won for us
    through his Son Jesus Christ.
  • We are called to be peacemakers because Jesus is
    our Peacemaker.

37
Glorify God
  • Conflict always provides an opportunity to
    glorify God
  • If you do not "glorify God" when you are involved
    In a conflict, you will inevitably glorify
    someone or something else.

38
Glorify God
  • We glorify God when we
  • trust him
  • obey him
  • imitate him
  • Glorifying God means that we have to have a high
    view of God.

39
Get the Log Out!
  • Two kinds of logs that need removing
  • Negative attitudes that leads to unnecessary
    conflicts
  • Actual sinful words and actions.

40
Get the Log Out!
  • Overlooking sin
  • God commands us to overlook minor offenses
    (Proverbs 1911)
  • When should we overlook?
  • If the offense does not dishonor God
  • If your relationship hasn't been permanently
    damaged
  • If others are not being hurt

41
Get the Log Out!
  • Examine Yourself
  • When we see that we have sinned, we need to
    repent.
  • Repentance is not remorse, it's a change of the
    way we think and act.
  • Repentance takes place when we see sin for what
    it is an offense against God.

42
Get the Log Out
  • When we repent and confess our sins, we get three
    benefits
  • Clear conscience before God through absolution
  • First step toward constructive change
  • Set an example that others will often follow.

43
Get the Log Out
  • The Seven As of Confession
  • Address everyone involved
  • Avoid if, but, or maybe

44
Get the Log Out
  • Admit specifics
  • Attitudes
  • Words
  • Actions

45
Get the Log Out
  • Acknowledge the hurt
  • Accept the consequences

46
Get the Log Out
  • Alter your behavior (A fruit of repentance.)
  • Ask for forgiveness

47
Get the Log Out
  • What if the other person wont forgive?
  • Make sure your confession was complete. Ask if
    there is anything else that needs to be brought
    up.
  • Allow time (the eighth A)

48
Get the Log Out
  • Never confess to
  • Get a burden off your shoulders
  • Gain comfort for yourself
  • Minimize the seriousness of your sin

49
Get the Log Out
  • Instead
  • Seek to glorify God
  • Bring comfort to the person you have wronged

50
Gently Restore
  • When you know someone has something against you.
  • You may clear up a misunderstanding.
  • You may learn that you were really wrong.
  • You may help deliver someone from unforgiveness

51
Gently Restore
  • We often dont want to confront because we do not
    want to look like we are judging.
  • We are commanded to use proper judgment.

52
Gently Restore
  • Confrontation is necessary when someone is caught
    in a sin.
  • The purpose of confrontation is to restore the
    offender to usefulness with God.

53
Gently Restore
  • Going is not optional
  • From an essay by Southern Illinois District
    President Herb Mueller

54
Gently Restore
  • In confrontation
  • Speak in order to build up
  • Listen carefully
  • Prepare

55
Gently Restore
  • Pray
  • Choose the right time and place
  • Believe the best until you can prove otherwise

56
Gently Restore
  • Talk in person if possible
  • Plan your words
  • Be gracious

57
Gently Restore
  • Be objective (facts vs. personal opinions)
  • Use Scripture carefully and correctly
  • Properly apply the Law
  • Properly apply the Gospel

58
Gently Restore
  • Remember
  • Your job is to speak the truth in love as clearly
    and persuasively as possible
  • Gods job is to change the persons heart.

59
Go and Be Reconciled
  • Forgiveness
  • Forgiveness is not
  • A feeling
  • Forgetting
  • Excusing
  • Forgiveness is a decision!

60
Go and Be Reconciled
  • The major penalty of sin
  • Separation
  • Forgiveness releases us from this penalty

61
Go and Be Reconciled
  • The Four Promises of Forgiveness
  • I will not think about this.
  • I will not bring this up again or use it against
    you.
  • I will not talk about this to anyone else.
  • I will not allow this to come between us.

62
Go and Be Reconciled
  • The First Promise
  • Immediate
  • Made to God
  • Unconditional

63
Go and Be Reconciled
  • The other promises
  • Conditional A commitment made to the offender
    after repentance and confession.
  • You can always overlook minor offenses.

64
Go and Be Reconciled
  • What about consequences?
  • There is a time for mercy.
  • There is a time for consequences.
  • Personal forgiveness does NOT free us from
    material consequences.

65
Go and Be Reconciled
  • Overcoming unforgiveness
  • Unforgiveness will separate us from God

66
Go and Be Reconciled
  • We need to renounce sinful attitudes and
    unrealistic expectations
  • Expecting someone to earn or deserve forgiveness
  • Desiring to punish the other person
  • Demanding a guarantee of behavior

67
Go and Be Reconciled
  • Remember your baptism and your forgiveness from
    God.

68
Go and Be Reconciled
  • Reconciliation
  • Reconciliation means your relationship is
    restored to at least the condition it was in
    before the conflict arose.
  • Reconciliation takes work.
  • If you are coasting, you are probably going
    downhill!

69
Go and Be Reconciled
  • The replacement principle (Luke 627-28)
  • In thought (Love)
  • In word (bless)
  • In deed (do good)

70
Go and Be Reconciled
  • Not forgive and forget
  • But forgive to forget.

71
Go and Be Reconciled
  • Resolving the issue The PAUSE Principle
  • Prepare
  • Pray
  • Get the facts
  • Identify issues and interests

72
Go and Be Reconciled
  • Seek godly counsel
  • Study Scripture
  • Plan your opening remarks

73
Go and Be Reconciled
  • Affirm relationships
  • Be polite
  • Spend time on personal issues
  • Exercise authority with restraint
  • Be wiling to submit to authority

74
Go and Be Reconciled
  • Earnestly understand the others concerns and
    perspectives
  • Look out for the interests of others
  • Confront in a gracious manner
  • Allow face saving

75
Go and Be Reconciled
  • Understand the difference between issues,
    positions. and interests
  • Issues
  • What the conflict is about
  • Ask it in the form of a question that can be
    answered by either party.

76
Go and Be Reconciled
  • Positions
  • Where the parties stand on an issue.
  • A position is a desired outcome for a definable
    perspective on an issue.
  • Positions tend to be mutually exclusive and
    incompatible.

77
Go and Be Reconciled
  • Interests
  • Why the parties take their positions.
  • Interests are the motivations that underlie a
    position and may reflect values, concerns,
    desires, needs, or limitations.
  • Interests may be concrete or abstract and more
    easily dovetailed than positions.

78
Go and Be Reconciled
  • There are exclusive interests and common
    interests
  • The questions is how we can use our mutual
    interests to work through the issue to bring a
    new and creative solution

79
Go and Be Reconciled
  • Search for creative solutions
  • Brainstorm Separate inventing from deciding.
  • Expand the pie discover other interests and deal
    with them

80
Go and Be Reconciled
  • Evaluate options

81
Go and Be Reconciled
  • An exercise
  • You and a friend are going to a movie, but you
    can't agree on which one. Identify the following
  • the issue (in the form of a question)
  • your two positions
  • the interests underlying your positions. List as
    many interests you can.
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