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Targeting Evidence Based Practices: Tools And Resources In Serving Students with Autism Spectrum Dis

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Importance of and need for dissemination of evidence based practices ... There is variability in symptomatology and responsiveness to intervention across ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Targeting Evidence Based Practices: Tools And Resources In Serving Students with Autism Spectrum Dis


1
Targeting Evidence Based Practices Tools And
Resources In Serving Students with Autism
Spectrum Disorders
  • Presented by
  • Marilyn Gense and Annette Skowron-Gooch,
  • Willamette ESD and Jay Gense, ODE

2
ODEs Perspective
  • Importance of and need for dissemination of
    evidence based practices
  • Regional Program delivery of quality services
    supporting students with ASD
  • Over-arching structure used to support statewide
    services

3
Statewide Consultation and Resources for ASD
4
  • Alignment with Regional Programs
  • Alignment with Research
  • Alignment with RPATS
  • Resources

5
current research about evidence-based practices
6
WHY?
7
What does scientifically-based research mean and
how will states design systems to implement
scientifically-based programs?
  • Key Questions

8
Evidence -Based
  • Who
  • What/Where/When
  • How

9
WHOWHATWHERE
  • Individuals (e.g. Arick Company)
  • NIMH
  • http//www.nimh.nih.gov/healthinformation/autismm
    enu.cfm
  • STAART
  • NAAR
  • http//www.naar.org/

10
WHAT
  • Boston University
  • Kennedy Krieger Institute
  • Mt. Sinai Medical School
  • University of California, Los Angeles
  • University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • University of Rochester
  • University of Washington
  • Yale University

11
WHAT
  • Peer Reviewed Journals
  • Special Projects
  • http//sped.usu.edu/ASSERT/research.html
  • Book -Educating Children with Autism
  • Other Publications http//psy.ucsd.edu/autism/pub
    lications.html

12
ABA and Autism Link
http//www.behavior.org/autism/
13
The following elements describe effective
instructional methods
  • 1. Instructional methods have documented
    effectiveness and, ideally, reflect empirically
    validated practices.
  • 2. The methodology promotes maximum engagement in
    appropriate activities and targeted skill areas.
  • 3. Instructional methods
  • a. Emphasize the use of naturally occurring
    reinforcers (rewards)
  • b. Promote high rates of successful performance
  • c. Encourage communication and social
    interaction and
  • d. Encourage the spontaneous use of learned
    skills in different settings.

14
  • 4. While the acquisition of new skills occurs
    first, the generalization and maintenance of
    these skills are equally important when educating
    students with autism. Programs should have a
    clear plan to systematically promote the
    maintenance and generalization of learned skills
    to a variety of natural environments. Doing so
    will require that a student be able to cope with
    the distractions and disruptions of daily living.
    It is noteworthy that methods used to teach new
    skills may differ from those that support
    generalization and maintenance.
  • 5. Instructional methods are adapted to the range
    of ages, abilities, and learning styles of the
    students with autism.
  • http//www.state.nj.us/njded/specialed/info/autis
    m.pdf

15
Big Question?
  • In the absence of research, how do we make
    decisions?

16
How http//www.iidc.indiana.edu/irca/education/p
racticalRecommend.html
  • There is variability in symptomatology and
    responsiveness to intervention across children
    therefore, all intervention should be
    individualized.
  • The earliest possible intervention should be
    considered to aid in the prevention of the
    emergence of severe problems.
  • Intervention should take place primarily in the
    natural environment.
  • The childs motivation to overcome his or her
    disability should be promoted.
  • Analyses of the functions of the childs behavior
    need to be conducted.

17
  • Full school and community inclusion needs to be
    planned and implemented throughout the
    lifespan.
  • Parental participation is important.
  • Generalization and maintenance of intervention
    gains need to be planned and evaluated.
  • Coordination among individual providers,
    educators, and parents enhances the childs
    progress.
  • The childs independence needs to be promoted.
  • The social significance of the intervention for
    the childs and the familys quality of life
    needs to be considered.

18
RESOURCES
19
Example Sensory Integration
  • Developmental Sensory Disorder Contributions
    From A Clinical Perspective (Goldson)
  • Differentiation of Sensory Processing Disorder
    Subtypes Using Non-Invasive Neurophysiology
    Measures of Sensory Gating (Kisley)
  • Sensory Gating Measured by Evoked Potentials in
    Children with Sensory Modulation Dysfunction
    (Davies and Gavin)
  • Sensory Processing Disorder Possible Pathways to
    DSM-V (First)
  • The Superior Colliculus as a Model for
    Understanding Neuron Behavior (Stein)
  • Twin Studies of Tactile and Auditory
    Defensiveness (Goldsmith)

20
Another Example
  • Journals

21
The National Institute of Mental Health suggests
a list of questions parents can ask when planning
for their child
  • How successful has the program been for other
    children?
  • How many children have gone on to placement in a
    regular school and how have they performed?
  • Do staff members have training and experience in
    working with children and adolescents with
    autism?
  • How are activities planned and organized?
  • Are there predictable daily schedules and
    routines?

22
  • How much individual attention will my child
    receive?
  • How is progress measured? Will my child's
    behavior be closely observed and recorded?
  • Will my child be given tasks and rewards that are
    personally motivating?
  • Is the environment designed to minimize
    distractions?
  • Will the program prepare me to continue the
    therapy at home?
  • What is the cost, time commitment, and location
    of the program?

23
Autism Spectrum Disorder Statewide
Library Oregon Department of Education Library
Housed and Managed by the Autism Spectrum
Disorder Program Willamette ESD 2611 Pringle Road
SE Salem, OR 97302 For information on checkout
contact Meagan Head at 503.588.5330
24
Effective PracticesRegional Programs and
Districts
25
How Can We Help?
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