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Title: A%20Brief%20History%20of%20Medical%20Imaging


1
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Welcome to an on-line health and safety training
package intended primarily for staff working
within UofE offices on the Little France campus.
Information contained within these pages is for
use by University of Edinburgh staff and students
only.
2
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
This on-line training package is not a substitute
for more detailed training which may be organised
by senior managers.
Last updated November 2013
3
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Please take time to view the following material,
and direct any urgent questions to your HS
Advisor, Supervisor, Senior Manager, or the
Little France Buildings HS Manager (the contact
details for whom are shown on the last page of
this presentation).
Thank you
4
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Isnt this the Cleaners job?
NO! A fair chunk of the responsibility is yours,
for the following reasons
5
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Its your responsibility because
You have a duty of care for those who come into
your lab but dont necessarily know what goes on
there (including cleaners). They have a
reasonable right to expect that you will take
steps to ensure that they do not come to harm
from your work.
6
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Its your responsibility because
Good housekeeping is important in all workplaces,
but this is perhaps especially true in
laboratories, and most certainly forms a strong
basis upon which to minimise the risk of injury
both to laboratory users and visitors to labs,
including cleaners.
7
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Laboratories that are clean and tidy also provide
auditors and inspectors with persuasive evidence
of effective management, competent organisation
and good working practices. Conversely, an
untidy lab may encourage visiting auditors to go
looking for other possible deficiencies in best
practice and examples of management oversight or
neglect.
8
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Its your responsibility because
Cleanliness is also fundamental to minimising
contamination and ensuring a safe working
environment for you, your colleagues and visitors
to your laboratory.
9
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Lab Staff
10
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Lab Staff
Cleaners should generally not be expected to
clean laboratory sinks. If, exceptionally,
special arrangements have been agreed beforehand,
you should first ensure that both the draining
board area and the sink itself have been cleared
of all chemicals, biological material, sharps,
glassware and items of equipment that may cause
harm to cleaning staff.
11
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Lab Staff
Cleaners will clean wash-hand basins, but these
should be free of hazardous material at all times
anyway.
12
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Lab Staff
Surplus dry ice should not be allowed to thaw out
in sinks, where cleaners and others may come into
contact with it, but should be committed to
properly designated dry ice stores.
Neither should dry ice be stored in fridges, even
for short periods of time.
13
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Lab Staff
Cleaners should not normally be expected to clean
laboratory benches. An exception to this may be
where the benches have been completely cleared of
all hazardous substances, materials and equipment
specifically for the purpose of periodic
deep-cleaning of the laboratory, and safety has
been certified by the lab manager, but this is
subject to special prior arrangements with
cleaning supervisors.
14
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Lab Staff
Chemicals should always be returned to the
correct location, and not placed under benches or
elsewhere on the floor, even temporarily.
Containers of liquids should be stored on drip
trays. Flasks containing culture supernatant, for
example, should also be placed in some type of
secondary containment to help prevent them from
being knocked over and spilled.
15
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Lab Staff
Larger volumes of flammable or corrosive
chemicals should be stored in purpose-designed
and appropriately labelled storage cabinets, and
returned promptly to these after use.
16
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Lab Staff
Sharps bins and waste bins must never be
overfilled. Waste in any event (and of whatever
type) should simply not be allowed to accumulate
in labs.
17
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Lab Staff
Small working amounts of chemicals should be
stored in containers clearly labelled with the
name of the chemical, with all relevant hazard
warning pictograms properly displayed, and the
containers should be resealed after use.
18
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Lab Staff
Chemicals should be placed to the rear of the
bench when not in use, or on purpose-designed
racks above the bench (but not so high as to
present a problem accessing them safely).
Corrosive, flammable and poisonous chemicals
should not be left on the open bench when not in
use.
19
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Lab Staff
Where experiments involving hazardous substances
and/or equipment must be left running overnight,
it may be necessary to exclude cleaners from the
area where each such experiment has been set up,
perhaps by clear use of warning and prohibition
signage, and maybe even by cordoning-off the
area. An exception to this may be (subject to
risk assessment) if the experiment is wholly
confined within a fume cupboard (for example)
with the sash fully closed.
20
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Lab Staff
All apparatus left running overnight must be
clearly labelled with information describing
actions to be taken, and the person(s) to be
contacted, in the event of an accident involving
the equipment. Take care also to label power
supply sockets, otherwise essential equipment may
be disconnected from sockets to supply
electrically-powered cleaning equipment.
21
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Lab Staff
Hazard warning signs should be used judiciously.
For chemical hazards, these should be affixed to
bottles etc. containing hazardous material, or to
equipment that represents an electrical hazard.
Extraneous warning signs (other than those
relating to the labs biosafety containment
level, radiation hazards and the presence of
compressed gas cylinders) should generally not be
displayed on laboratory doors, as this may
confuse attending emergency services.
22
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Lab Staff
Cleaning staff may be excluded from certain areas
where, because of special local hazards, cleaning
is being undertaken instead by laboratory staff.
Or perhaps cleaning staff may be asked to work
in these areas under the direct supervision of a
laboratory manager after agreement has been
reached with the cleaning supervisor and the lab
manager has assessed and discussed the particular
risks with the cleaners who will be undertaking
the work.
23
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Lab Staff
Examples of areas where cleaners would not
normally be permitted access include Controlled
Radiation Areas, Containment Level 3
laboratories, and areas where there is Magnetic
Resonance Imaging equipment. All of these
should, of course, be clearly signposted so as to
make perfectly clear that access is restricted
specifically to authorised personnel only.
24
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Lab Staff
Pressurised gas cylinders must be securely
fastened, usually in an upright position, by the
use of purpose-designed brackets and clamps,
chains or belts, and care should be taken to
ensure that there is no risk of cleaners becoming
snagged up in connecting pipework.
25
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Lab Staff
Be aware that if cleaners are wet-washing or
polishing floors, surfaces may well be more
slippery than usual, so take care when moving
through area where cleaners are operating,
particularly if wet floor signage is being
displayed.
26
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Cleaners
27
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Cleaners
Where protective clothing has been provided,
always wear it when at work and keep it properly
fastened up. Keep protective clothing apart from
your outdoor clothing. Unless you have
specifically been told that it is safe to do so,
do not take protective clothing home to wash.
Where protective clothing has not been
provided, report any spillage of laboratory
materials onto your clothes by informing your
supervisor as soon as possible after the spill.
28
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Cleaners
Do not wear protective clothing (including
gloves) in the staff room or canteen, or any
other area where food is being prepared or
consumed, but replace protective clothing before
recommencing work.
29
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Cleaners
Wash your hands regularly, and always when you
have finished work or stop for a break.
30
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Cleaners
Before you start work in laboratories, always
cover cuts and grazes (however small) with a
waterproof dressing until the wound is fully
healed. Dressing are available to take from
first aid boxes, but please inform a member of
staff when you have done so, in order that the
supply may be replenished.
31
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Cleaners
When cleaning sink areas, always wear gloves (but
not products containing latex, which may cause
allergic skin reactions in some people).
32
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Cleaners
Report all accidents (including discovery of
anything that is leaking in the laboratory, or
which has been knocked over) by speaking as soon
as possible with your supervisor, and perhaps
also with the person in charge of the laboratory
where you have been working if they are present
within the building.
33
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Cleaners
Incidents too must be reported, even where there
has been no actual injury or loss, but things
might very easily have been different if those
involved had been less fortunate.
34
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Cleaners
Do not attempt to clear up after an accident,
whether or not you may have caused it yourself,
unless a member of the laboratory staff has told
you that it is safe to do so.
35
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Cleaners
Never pick up broken glass or other sharp objects
with your fingers use a dustpan and brush
instead. If there is no-one around to tell you
whether or not it is safe to clear up a spillage
or breakage, then you should put out some hazard
warning signs, inform your supervisor, and then
leave it for the laboratory staff to deal with.
36
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Cleaners
Do not eat, drink, smoke, chew or apply cosmetics
in the laboratory. Never put anything in your
mouth whilst you are in the laboratory this
includes pens, pencils, tools, cables, your
fingers, etc.
37
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Cleaners
Do not even take food, drink, cigarettes,
overcoats etc into the laboratory. These are all
potential routes by which contamination can be
transferred from your hands to your mouth.
Prohibited items must be left outside the
laboratory so that theres no possibility of them
becoming contaminated.
38
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Cleaners
Do not touch anything whilst in the laboratory
unless it is necessary for you to do so in order
for you to carry out your work, and you have been
told that it is safe to do so by lab staff or by
your supervisor. In particular, do not touch
anything on the benches, and only move things on
the floor if it is clearly safe for you to do so.
39
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Cleaners
Do not touch, empty or move things in the
laboratory sinks unless you have been told that
it is safe to do so. Do not disconnect
electrical equipment or trail cables over benches
or anywhere they might create potential for a
trip injury.
40
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Cleaners
Never attempt to clean up a spillage of unknown
substances, no matter how harmless it may seem.
Some hazardous chemicals may look like water,
and have no smell, but they might nevertheless
damage your eyes, skin or lungs, and that damage
may not become apparent until quite some time
later.
41
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Cleaners
Keep clear of spillages, take steps to prevent
anyone else walking into spilled materials, and
obtain advice from laboratory staff (or, where
none are present, from your supervisor).
42
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Cleaners
If you have an accident and injure yourself,
especially if you break the skin or get something
into your eyes or mouth, you must report it to
your supervisor at once and see that it is
recorded in the Accident Book or on-line
at http//www.ed.ac.uk/schools-departments/healt
h-safety/accident-reporting/reporting-form/form
43
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Cleaners
If you become ill following a laboratory
accident, you should tell your doctor where you
work so that, if necessary, they can talk to
someone in the University about what you do as a
laboratory cleaner.
44
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Cleaners
If you accidentally spill a chemical on your
skin, immediately place the affected area under
running water, for approximately fifteen minutes
or until a colleague has obtained assistance
from a knowledgeable source. If you have to go
to hospital, note the name of the substance, as
shown on the label from the bottle/carton, and
inform the doctor. Do not take the substance to
hospital with you.
45
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Cleaners
Remember that some cleaning chemicals are
potentially harmful if not used carefully and in
strict accordance with manufacturers
guidance. Never mix cleaning chemicals or use
these at greater than the recommended
concentrations. Use cleaning equipment, too,
only in accordance with guidance.
46
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Cleaners
If you have any doubts that it is safe to start
or continue work, then you should not start or
continue until the matter is sorted out. You
should report any such problems to your
supervisor.
47
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Responsibilities of Cleaners
Be aware, when wet-washing or polishing floors,
that lab and office staff may be so wrapped-up in
what they are doing that they may not be paying
attention to wet floor signage. So be prepared
to call-out to warn people that they may be
straying into areas where floors are unusually
slippery.
48
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Further Information
Further information pertaining to cleaning
laboratories, including guidance for managers and
supervisors as well as for cleaners working in
laboratories, is contained in Section 15
(Cleaning of Laboratories) in the Little France
Safety Manual, which can be accessed
at http//docstore.mvm.ed.ac.uk/HealthAndSafety/
manual/Manual15.pdf
49
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
Lindsay Murray Health Safety Manager, The
University of Edinburgh, College of Medicine
Veterinary Medicine (Chancellors Building,
Medical School and Queens Medical Research
Institute), Little France
Room SU215, Chancellors Building Ext
26390 lgm_at_staffmail.ed.ac.uk
50
HEALTH SAFETY _at_ LITTLE FRANCE CLEANING THE
LABORATORY
You have now completed this on-line training
package summarising health and safety factors
applicable to cleaning laboratories on the Little
France site. Please also attend any additional
training that may be organised by your senior
manager.
Thank you
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