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Factors associated with the effective inclusion of primary aged pupils with Downs Syndrome

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Down Syndrome: A genetic disorder that is caused by the presence of an extra ... Children with Down Syndrome usually have strong non-verbal communication skills. ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Factors associated with the effective inclusion of primary aged pupils with Downs Syndrome


1
Factors associated with the effective inclusion
of primary- aged pupils with Downs Syndrome
  • BY
  • Stephanie Davies
  • Carlo DeVuono

2
Definition
  • Down Syndrome A genetic disorder that is caused
    by the presence of an extra chromosome, which
    results in varying degrees of physical and mental
    abnormality. Physical characteristics of the
    syndrome include a flattened face, widely spaced
    and slanted eyes, comparatively smaller head size
    and lax joints. Although not present in all
    cases, mental retardation is typical. Those who
    are affected with the syndrome display a wide
    variety in mental, behavior and developmental
    capabilities, and will have a high propensity to
    suffer from common health problems, include a low
    resistance to infection, pronounced hearing loss,
    gastrointestinal problems, and heart defects

3
Down Syndrome in the Class
  • Since 1975 and the passing of the Education for
    All Handicapped Children Act, there has been a
    lot of progress in mainstreaming. Children with
    disabilities including Down Syndrome are in
    regular education classrooms. Many teachers feel
    they are not prepared to have these types of
    classrooms. In these inclusion classrooms, the
    teacher must focus on the rest of the class while
    also making accommodations for the child with
    Down Syndrome. One of the worries is that the
    children without disabilities will suffer from
    lack of individualized attention or lowered
    academic standards.

4
Teaching Partnership Inclusion Program
  • The NDSS Teaching Partnership Inclusion Program
    is designed to educate students and teachers
    about the capabilities of people with Down
    syndrome, and to encourage positive relationships
    between people with and without disabilities.
    This new program offers lesson plans, videos and
    materials to help classroom teachers present the
    important concepts of uniqueness, diversity,
    friendship and inclusion.

5
Background of the study
  • Two year research project exploring the inclusion
    of primary-aged pupils with Downs syndrome.
  • 18 primary schools
  • Each school is responsible for educating a child
    with DS
  • Mainstream classroom
  • Full-time/ varying amounts of support

6
Background
  • All schools were visited once for a week, in year
    one and two.
  • Ages 5 11
  • 11 male / 7 female
  • Interviews teacher, teaching assistant and
    parents of the pupil
  • Observations follow the pupil for the entire
    day (watch how they interact)

7
Positive
  • Gradual increase of DS in the classroom
  • Continued growth
  • Improvement
  • Social development
  • Language
  • Math skills
  • Help for the pupil
  • Same TA both years
  • The entire staff is involved
  • Efficient communication

8
Negative
  • Schools were visited once a year
  • The amount of support that each student received
    varied
  • 15 to 30 hours
  • Funding was not equal
  • Teachers would work through TAs

9
Key factors to improve inclusion
  • Teacher must take a more central role in the
    daily educational experiences of the child.
  • Teacher must work well with their TA
  • Child must be seen as a central part of the
    learning process

10
Teaching Down Syndrome
  • Children with Down Syndrome usually have strong
    non-verbal communication skills. There is some
    evidence that suggests they also possess
    imitative behavior, which means they benefit from
    modeling. Being in an environment that uses
    modeling as a teaching technique could help the
    child. Another advantage is that they would be in
    a room with students that are probably
    linguistically at a higher level than they are
    and that would help them learn.

11
Down syndrome
  • Research indicates that children with Down
    Syndrome learn much faster with the help of
    non-verbal communication such as visual aids and
    signing or gestures, because they may have
    auditory problems and/or a weak short-term
    auditory memory. The use of visual directions and
    visuals during instruction in the classroom would
    benefit the child. There are different levels of
    need for gestures. Some may need a signing
    interpreter, but for less severe cases basic
    gestures can be used by everyone in the class. It
    is proven that these non-verbal actions can help
    improve the childs verbal language.

12
Article
  • Factors associated with the effective inclusion
    of primary- aged pupils with Downs syndrome
  • (Sam Fox, Peter Farrell, Pauline Davis)
  • British Journal of Special Education
  • Volume 31 number 4

13
Websites
  • http//www.nas.com/downsyn
  • A listing of organizations worldwide, support
    groups, and toy catalogs for children of special
    needs
  • http//www.ndss.org
  • The National Down Syndrome Society is a
    not-for-profit organization
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