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Getting the Brand Experience Right

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Title: Getting the Brand Experience Right


1
Getting the Brand Experience Right Day One
2
Welcome
3
Welcome
4
Donor Loyalty Dolls
  • Select a Donor

5
Outline
Day One
  • Pursuit of Brand Happiness
  • Doing the Most Good Case Study of The Salvation
    Army
  • Developing Your Brand Story
  • Presentations of Assignment
  • Design Your Brand Experience Exercise
  • Extending Your Brand Experience Online

Day Two
6
Yesterday, The most successful nonprofits were
those that donors knew best.
7
Today, The most successful nonprofits are those
that know their donors best.
8
Not simply as statistics but as real people
9
Donors are not ATMs
  • They are driven by needs and wants and they give
    based on an exchange of values.
  • Enhancing self-worth
  • Doing the right thing
  • Creating a return on investment

10
And people give . . .
To people who Are in need Are in
crisis Are in despair
11
Donors are loyal to . . .
  • Charities that . . .
  • Lead the way.
  • Connect emotionally.
  • Provide relevance and meaning.
  • Offer significance and fulfillment.
  • Help them make a statement about what they value.
  • Help them to accomplish great visions.
  • To help change the world now and for all time.
  • To provide them with a sense of belonging to
    something greater than themselves.
  • Communicate the impact of your collective efforts
    for it is in that donors find meaning and
    purpose.

12
People best respond to . . .
  • A communication continuum that . . .
  • Seeks first to listen and understand
  • Has a vision of relationship building
  • Is responsive
  • Is relevant
  • Is driven by the donor
  • An in your face strategy is short-lived
  • An in your life strategy endures

13
Loyal Donor
Time - Talent - Influence - Resources - Money
14
Faithfulness in givingFrequency
Lifestyle
Increase in giving
Volunteerism
Attend events
Feel proud extraordinary
Use the services of the organization
TestimonialsRecruiting
History
Email Address
Responsive to calls to action focus groups,
protests, go vote, surveys
Meaning Purpose
Believe the org is doing excellent work
Feel integral to the mission
Glad to hear from you
15
This is our time...dont blink
  • Golden age of philanthropy
  • Maturation of sector
  • Professional Fundraising
  • Savvy donors
  • Spiritually starved boomers
  • Technology and communication

16
Donor Driven Philanthropy
  • Dream Brokers Kay Sprinkel Grace
  • Unlimited potentialbut what gets in the way?
  • 1) Story non profits arent good at telling
    their own story, their competitive niche and
    their risky dreams
  • our humility, which is consistent with our
    values and work, can work against us
  • 2) NGOs havent learned that donors want to know
    how we spend their money
  • -- and you have to tell me before I ask!

17
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18
Biggest potential in fundraising?
  • PLUMS

19
Where to focus PLUMS
  • People
  • Like
  • U and
  • Me
  • Source IFC Congress, Amsterdam, 2005

20
The Campions How groups move to
our top shelf
  • 1) Relevance
  • 2) Responsiveness
  • 3) Respect
  • 4) Our experience with you

21
1. RELEVANCE
  • How we see you
  • Donors do not give to organizations because
    organizations have needs they give because
    organizations meet needs.
  • Kay Sprinkel Grace, Beyond Fundraising

22
2. Responsiveness
  • The world is changing are you? Annual case for
    support
  • Keep me current
  • Sort through the noise I will value you more

23
3. Respect
  • We all think we are a major donor!
  • Donor Centered Fundraising puts satisfying
    donors need for meaningful communication at the
    top of the agenda
  • Donor-Centered Fundraising
  • Penelope Burk, Cygnus Applied Research, 2003,
    www.donorcentred.ca

24
How we feel as regular, consistent donors
Bummer of a birthmark Hal
25
We Dont Stop Giving
  • We stop giving to you
  • 86 of all households give
  • Average donor supports 10 organizations
  • Over 34 of donors support 20 organizations
  • Of these, we really value three to four
  • If you fail to meet our expectations, we will get
    them met somewhere else.
  • Source Donor Centered Fundraising, Penelope
    Burk

26
Why We Stop Giving To You
  • Poor or lack of information (46)
  • Mismanagement of funds (37)
  • Multiple solicitations (38 turned off 28 not
    likely to give again)
  • No progress in mission (28)
  • High overhead (15)
  • Negative media (14)
  • Aggressive fundraising (12)
  • Other causes (10) Source Donor Centered
    Fundraising, Penelope Burk

27
Communicating Impact
  • 55 of donors do not receive information on the
    measurable impact of their donations
  • 65 of donors dont read newsletters
  • Content
  • Too long
  • No time
  • Getting 20 newsletters, 4x/year 8 pages
  • 68 would prefer one page updates
  • 50 would prefer updates via email
  • Donor-Centered Fundraising Penelope Burk,
    Cygnus Applied Research, 2003 www.donorcentred.ca

28
What We Want(BEFORE you ask us again!)
  • 1) Prompt acknowledgement that the gift was
    received
  • Two weeks from receipt of the gift
  • 2) Confirmation that the money was used in the
    way they intended it to be used
  • 3) Updates on progress made because of the
    donation
  • Donor-Centered Fundraising Penelope Burk,
    Cygnus Applied Research, 2003 www.donorcentred.ca

29
What if You Give Us What We Want?
  • 93 of donors say they would definitely or
    probably give again
  • 74 would continue to give continuously
  • 64 would give more
  • Donor-Centered Fundraising Penelope Burk,
    Cygnus Applied Research, 2003 www.donorcentred.ca

30
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31
Branding
Nonprofit branding is different than branding in
the for-profit arena. Instead of merely telling
a customer how to think and feel about a product,
nonprofit brands help people take action to do
more and be more. The charity and the
constituent are co-creators of the brand promise.
Brand Promise
Organization
Constituent
32
Branding
For-profits think of products first which create
loyalty to the brand. A traditional for-profit
branding model is, build it, brand it, sell
it. Nonprofits see the real product as a result
of a partnership between them and purpose-minded
constituents thus creating loyalty through the
brand.
Brand Promise
Organization
Constituent
33
Branding
The more you present a clear, concise and
constant message the better you will be at
positioning your charity in the hearts and minds
of people. This could be feed one child and
that could be eliminate hunger throughout the
world.
Donors see the world in a certain way and they
are looking to become a part of something larger
than themselves. Therefore, give your
constituents a big vision and remind them
constantly of how together, you are making the
world better.
Vision
Brand Promise
Organization
Constituent
34
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35
(No Transcript)
36
Impact Question
We peaked in the sixties
37
For nearly 200 years, ABS has been a publisher
and distributor of Gods Word.
to
People gave to them because ABS is a ministry.
ABS transforms lives. Donors have personally
experienced a transformation in their own lives
from reading the Bible.
38
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39
800,000 people visit the museum each year. No
strategy to capture names and information. Members
hip is down, how do we inspire people to
membership? Marketing and Development are not
integrated. Positioning Strategy . . . NFL
commercial on NY.
40
Brand Triangle
What people say Top 5-6 things you want people to
say
Benefits of the Charity Top 5-6 benefits you
provide
One Thing Positioning Strategy
41
What are the three most important things to
consider when purchasing real estate?
location location location
42
  • Mind Share

Mind share is the amount of mental real estate
you own in the publics mind when they think of
your charitable category.
Charitable category is a classification of a
cause, advocacy or philanthropy activity, such as
the arts, education, environment, animal,
homeless services, human rights, disaster relief,
various segments of health, etc.
43
Charitable Category Exercise
Disaster Relief
Animal Rescue
Environment
Empower Women in Poverty
Housing
Human Rights
Clean Water
Wildlife
Child Sponsorship
Global Poverty
Cancer Research
Bonus Question
44
Charitable Category Exercise Bonus Question
To the MOOO-seum.
Museums
45
  • Positioning
  • Minds are limited. People cant handle the
    mountains of information being generated.
  • Minds hate confusion. Over-simplification is the
    only way around over-communication.
  • Minds are insecure. People tend to be emotional,
    not rational.
  • Minds dont change. Once the marketplace makes
    up its mind, the discussion is over.
  • Minds can lose focus. Thats why long-term line
    extensions destroy a brand. Positioning by Jack
    Trout
  • (Xerox Computers / McDonalds
    Adult Hamburgers)

46
  • Positioning

Nonprofit brands run into trouble when they dont
understand their charitable category.
Furthermore, some organizations believe their
charity falls into multiple categories so they
resist positioning themselves in one specific
category. This is a mistake. Any good book on
branding will tell you that you can only be based
on one thing.
47
  • The Best Nonprofits

The best nonprofit brands today are built on two
things. First, doing excellent and trustworthy
work and second, presenting the same single
consistent message over many years. Brands that
follow these two guidelines have made relevant
connections with people your organization must
become relevant because no one wants to be
considered the alternative.
48
Charitable Category Assignment
  • What category is your charity in?
  • List 3 other organizations in your category.
  • List what each one does best.
  • List where each one could be better.
  • List how your organization is different than each
    one.
  • List any untapped opportunities.

49
  • Five Audiences of a Nonprofit Brand

There are five audiences of a nonprofit brand. Be
intentional and consistent toward these
audiences. Design a communication strategy for
each audience Internal Staff, Volunteers Board
Members External Donors (Individuals,
Corporations, Foundations) Public Potential
Staff Donors Media The Press, Online
Offline Beneficiary People Youve Helped
50
Donor Loyalty Dolls
  • Tell Us Something About Your Donor

How Much Money Have You Raised?
51
Case Study
52
Lets Talk Branding It is not a logo It
is not a tag line It is not a slogan
53
Lets Talk Branding It is not envelope
teaser copy It is not a headline It is
not a call to action It is not a campaign
name
54
Lets Talk Branding A truly strong brand is
like a sphere An inconsistent brand is
shapeless and lacks focus An inconsistent
brand never really establishes any
consistency, connectivity or conviction
55
What Is A Brand? Brands offer the comfort of
familiarity in a hostile world ?
Hallmark ? Kleenex ? Hersheys
Cocoa ? Gerbers ? Campbells Soup
56
Heres Our Starting Point A brand is a
promise A promise to achieve certain
results A promise to deliver a certain
experience A promise conveyed by everything
people see, hear, touch, taste or smell about
an organization
57
Heres Our Starting Point The right promise
will enable our brand to articulate . . .
? a higher calling ? a magnetic
personality ? an aspirational brand
affiliation
58
Heres Our Starting Point There are three
critical components ? it must be
rational ? it must be emotional ? it must
appeal to the ego of the targeted
audience
59
Spherical Branding A concept that causes a
brand to look precisely the same from wherever
you might see it, touch it or experience it.
60
Brand Vision Doing the most good Brand
Personality Passionate. Compassionate. Brave.
Uplifting. Trustworthy. Brand Positioning To
those who want to positively affect their
world, The Salvation Army is the charity that
maximizes contributions. Affiliation Informed
individuals who give where it will do the most
good.
61
Our Promise The reason why we get up and go to
work every day is . . . To do the most
good with your donations of time, money
and material resources To do the most good
for the most people with the most
needs
62
Seamless doing the most good Statements
Were committed, as always, to doing the most
good, but we cant do it alone. We need your
help especially now as we must . . .
With your generous gift of compassion
today, we can continue in our tradition of
doing the most good . . . carrying forth the
historical work of compassion that William
Booth began among the street children of
London in 1865.
63
Seamless doing the most good Statements
So I hope I can count on you to help now.
Your matching challenge gift will tell the
needy of our community that someone really
does care. Youll enable us to continue doing
the most good with your wonderful expression
of compassion. You know you can give
confidently because of our longstanding track
record of doing the most good . . .
64
Expressing the Brand Personality
Passionate Our mission was born out of
William Booths deep desire to bring the
gospel message to poor, hurting, lost souls
and meet their needs in Christs name. That
was over 100 years ago. Yet that same
passion continues to drive our efforts today
and to help change the lives of needy
neighbors in your community.
65
Expressing the Brand Personality
Compassionate At the heart of everything we
do youll find compassion. Compassion for the
hungry child . . . for the elderly shut-in . .
. For the homeless man . . . for the poor in
spirit.
66
Expressing the Brand Personality
Brave The Salvation Army has earned a
reputation for venturing into places and
circumstances others wont go dangerous,
crime-ridden neighborhoods . . . darkened
alleyways . . . squalid homes. Bringing help
and real hope to the poorest of the poor . . .
to addicts . . . to prostitutes . . . to
down-on-their-luck families . . . desperate
people shunned by society.
67
Expressing the Brand Personality
Uplifting Whether were helping a family who
has lost their home in a disaster, providing
food for an elderly shut-in, or giving a
Christmas toy to a poor child, our goal is
the same to lift up needy neighbors and
help relieve their suffering.
68
Expressing the Brand Personality
Trustworthy The Salvation Army has worked
hard to earn your trust and were committed
to continue in a manner so as to keep it.
Thats why a full 83 cents of every dollar we
receive goes directly to bringing help and
hope to hungry, homeless and hurting
neighbors.
69
2005 Review Objective Increase donations
to The Salvation Army by making people aware of
all the services we offer
Strategy Create a branding campaign that will
be used nationally as well as on the local
level
70
2005 Review Tactics TV Bell Ringer
Commercial Print (7 print ads) Web (toolkit
and ads) Radio (Paul Harvey) Signage (bus
shelters, trucks, theater slide, outdoor,
kettle signs) Graphic Standards (business
cards, letterhead, etc.)
71
2005 Review Brand Materials Overview
72
2005 Media Plan Target Adults 35 who want
to make a difference Timing July through
December 2005 (6 months) Geography National
Budget 1,600,000 gross
73
2005 Budget Recap Approx Donated
Value Cost _____________ _____
________ Paul Harvey sponsorship 360,000
784,676 Television 175,000
843,375 National magazines 1,046,692 No
Cost Outdoor 500,000 No
Cost _____________ _____________ Total
2,081,692 1,628,051 _____________ __________
___ Grand total to date 3,709,743

74
2005 Results Launched Doing The Most Good
nationally There were 2,023 downloads from
the Red Shield Toolkit online Online
donations last year were 51,981,018, a 933
increase over 2004
75
Doing The Most Good The Biblical mandate for
Doing The Most Good is found in Isaiah
110-17 Wash and make yourselves clean.
Take your evil deeds of apathy, compromise,
materialism, and love for the idols of
tradition out of my sight. Stop doing wrong
and learn to do good. Seek justice,
encourage the oppressed. Defend the cause
of the orphans and plead the case of the
widow.
76
Doing The Most Good . . . for there is no
greater reward equal to that of doing the most
good for the most people with the most
needs. Evangeline Booth
77
Donor Loyalty Dolls
  • Tell Us More About Your Donor

78
Brand Discovery Process Case Study
Distribute Bibles through bible studies
79
Brand Discovery Process Case Study
Major Issues Declining Income Donor
Retention New Donor Acquisition
80
Brand Discovery Process Case Study
  • Benefits Testing (Political Methodology)
  • Start with all benefits 100 150
  • Determine top 30
  • Develop Statements
  • Focus Group Setting
  • Allow Donors to Vote their Most Compelling to
    their Least Compelling.
  • Translate that into copy

81
Brand Discovery Process Case Study
82
Brand Discovery Process Case Study
83
Brand Discovery Process Case Study
84
Brand Discovery Process Case Study
85
Brand Discovery Process Case Study
86
Brand Discovery Process Case Study
87
Brand Discovery Process Case Study
88
The Most Compelling Benefit
89
Translate to CopyDistribute Bibles for what
purpose? Telling the whole story of distribution.
90
New Fundraising Paradigm
View marketing as something you do for donors and
not to donorsas if your fundraising were
something thats serving donors.
91
  • Mission-Driven Marketing

The living out and articulation of your charitys
core purpose. In other words, your
organizations marketing is the echo of your
mission.
Is the sound of your charitys echo concisely
clear, freshly imaginative, perfectly true, and
consistently reinforcing the story of your
mission? These are the secret ingredients for
marketing and fundraising success. Todd Baker
92
  • Mission-Driven Marketing

Put it to them briefly, so they will read it
clearly, so they will appreciate it
picturesquely, so they will remember it and,
above all, accurately, so they will be guided by
its light. Joseph Pulitzer, 1884
93
Lawsons Observation
David Lawson, a fundraising consultant, recently
enlightened our industry with the knowledge that
by 2005, financial institutions will be
collecting over 300 billion in management fees
alone. These fees represent only 1 of the 30
trillion in assets being managed. For comparison,
last year contributions in the United States
totaled 241 billion. Lawsons observation tells
us at least one thingthat people have the
capacity to donate more, so why dont they?
94
Bakers Theory
It is my belief that the reason people do not
give more money to charity is because they are
not inspired.
95
Bakers Theory
For-profit companies spend billions of dollars to
inspire people.
96
Bakers Theory
We are collectively failing to inspire donors
because what and how we communicate tends to be
all about usour effortsour good deedswhile the
most inspiring thing we can say is being left
unspoken.
97
Bakers Theory
We must change how we present our worthwhile
causesto focus more on the impact of our efforts
for that will win the hearts of donors. If we
can collectively make this small but innovative
change in our approach to fundraising and
communication, more people will become inspired
to give, thus there will be more money for
charity. As a result, more people will be
helped, making the world a better place.
98
Best Indicator for Success
Brand Revenue
99
We grant the wishes of children with
life-threatening medical conditions to enrich the
human experience with hope, strength and joy.
100



101

102

103

104




105
I support the Make-A-Wish Foundation because they
utilize volunteers to help children and their
families.
6



106
I take comfort in knowing that the Make-A-Wish
Foundation is a resource center for families with
ill children.
7



107
I gladly give to the Make-A-Wish Foundation in
order to provide a child with a memorable wish
experience.
8


108
I support the Make-A-Wish Foundation because they
make a childs dream come true.
9

109
I am privileged to be part of the Make-A-Wish
Foundation because of their partnership with
celebrities.
10

110
I am happy to support the work of the Make-A-Wish
Foundation because they take kids anywhere they
want to go.
11
111
Brandraising while Fundraising Translation Tool
What people say Top 5-6 things you want people to
say
Benefits of the Ministry Top 5-6 benefits you
provide
One Thing Positioning Strategy
112
Elevator Speech
Who Are You? What Do You Do? What Makes You
Unique?
113
Getting the Brand Experience Right Day Two
114
Donor Loyalty Dolls
  • How Can You Use Your Donor Information

115
Elevator Speech
Who Are You? What Do You Do? What Makes You
Unique?
Presentation
116
Elevator Speech Assignment
Dont Be Shy Who Wants to Go First?
117
Elevator Speech Assignment
118
The Nonprofit Brand Experience
119
Smell
Sight
Touch
Hear
Branding is Wine
Taste
Day After
120
The Nonprofit Brand Experience
Take Donors to the Front Lines of the
Work Vision Trips
121
Public Relations and Your Brand Biblical
Foundation
  • Do you bring in a lamp
  • to put it under a bowl or a bed?
  • Mark 421
  • So the man went away and began to tell in the
    Decapolis how much Jesus had done for him. And
    all the people were amazed.
  • Mark 520

122
  • Why bother?
  • If you dont speak for yourself at all
  • someone else will
  • Will they be correct?

123
  • Elements of public relations?
  • It all comes down to messages what do you hope
    others will say about you? How do you make your
    case?
  • Messages are informed by your brand
  • Who audience (brand affiliation)
  • What call to action (external) and brand
    positioning (internal)
  • How tone brand personality traits

124
  • Elements of public relations?
  • Internal
  • Members
  • employees
  • External
  • Media
  • Politicians
  • Clubs

125
  • Public Relations Tactics
  • Internal
  • Communicate clearly and often
  • Decisions that will affect constituents in any
    way
  • Before, during and after changes
  • Relationship, Horses Mouth
  • Newsletters, e-newsletters
  • Speaking engagements
  • Web 2.0
  • More and more

126
  • Public Relations Tactics
  • External
  • Communicate clearly and often
  • Vacuum of information is where rumors and
    supposition begin
  • Newsletters and e-newsletters
  • Speaking engagements
  • Web 2.0
  • Media
  • Materials (for you, for media)
  • Pitching
  • Responding to media requests

127
  • Media Training
  • Basics
  • Dos
  • Always respond to requests
  • Always be concise
  • Always repeat your messages (the rule of 3)
  • Donts
  • Ready, fire, aim
  • Bunny trails

128
  • Managing Issues
  • Follow Trends (media, legislation, policy and
    procedures, etc)
  • Prepare materials, Train spokespersons
  • Work with allies
  • Communicate with constituencies

129
  • Crisis Communications
  • Creating a plan before is better than as you go
  • Responding once an issue breaks
  • To send a release or not to send a release
  • Disaster Response vs. Legislative issue?

130
  • Summary
  • Everything we do should be measured against our
    personality traits and whether we are fulfilling
    our promise
  • If what you are doing is not fulfilling your
    promise then dont do it
  • The focus of the branding program should give
    each of us a reason to come to work each day
  • The branding program is not just about
    communications. It is about adopting a
    lifestyle. Its about living and breathing the
    brand

131
  • No matter what the situation nor the messages you
    develop you must always communicate within who
    you are.
  • What has God called you to be?

132
Brand Wisdom Document
Elements
  • Blank Charity is in the business of . . .
  • Blank Charitys purpose is to . . .
  • Primary Benefits of Blank Charity are . . .
  • The following are the top five things Blank
    Charity wants people to say about them . . .

133
Brand Wisdom Document
Elements
  • What donors say about Blank Charity . . .
  • Primary issues to address . . .
  • Organizational history . . .
  • Organizational Distinctives
  • Competitive Analysis

134
Brand Wisdom Document
Elements
  • 10. Primary Audiences
  • 11. Top Research Findings
  • 12. Brand Essence Statement

135
Free Online Resource
Step-by-Step Online Fundraising Success for
Nonprofits Todd Baker
www.OrgMarketing.com
136
The Internet
137
Yesterday
People would hunt and search for new content from
their favorite Web sites.
138
Today
Web sites, through RSS, are pushing relevant
content out to their constituents.
RSS is an acronym for Really Simple Syndication
and is an XML-based protocol for syndicating
content through the Internet.
139
Web 2.0
140
The Internet
This presentation is unique because it gives you
an understanding of the philanthropic online
experience from the charity and constituent
perspective simultaneously. Good marketers know
what works but great ones understand why things
work.
141
(No Transcript)
142
Write Down Who and What
143
like-minded people
144
I drive a Hybrid
Recycling is key
I walk to work
Its Gods Creation
Clean air for kids
Who would be interested in my cause and why and
where do they hang out online?
145
Nonprofits are standing in their own online
preverbal shadow and wonder why it is dark.  
Define Yourself . . .
146
War for Words
There is a battle being waged inside charities
and it will determine which nonprofits are more
relevant than others. The struggle I write about
is, one of definition or another way to put it .
. . a lack thereof. Unfortunately, Ive heard
many reasons as to why nonprofit organizations do
not clearly state their beliefs and/or values but
today I warn you, all that intellectual rationale
will only lead your charity a adrift on the slow
and passionless sea of irrelevancy.
147
Define Yourself
For-profits think of products first which creates
loyalty to the brand. A traditional for-profit
branding model is, build it, brand it, sell
it. Nonprofits see the real product as a result
of a partnership between them and purpose-minded
donors thus creating loyalty through the brand.
Nonprofit branding is different than branding in
the for-profit arena. Instead of merely telling
a customer how to think and feel about a product,
nonprofit brands help people take action to do
more and be more. The charity and the donor are
co-creators of the brand promise.
148
Core Message
Many charities speak about their internal
process, distribute, coordinate, manage,
facilitate but donors give because of the impact
of that process. Talk about this and not about
that.
Your organizations core message is found at the
heart of its brand. The more you present your
brand promise the better you will be at
attracting the right kind of donors.
149
Big Vision
Donors see the world in a certain way and they
are looking to become a part of something larger
than themselves. Therefore, give your donors a
big vision and remind them constantly of how
together, you are making the world better.
The more you present a clear, concise and
constant message the better you will be at
positioning your charity in the hearts and minds
of donors. This could be inspire a child and
that could be to enrich our culture.
150
You see, it isnt hard to explain the
step-by-step process on how to attract
like-minded individuals to your charity rather
it is getting your organization to settle on want
you stand for . . . who you are, what you
uniquely do, and why youover similar
nonprofits. The answers to these questions are
your charitys guiding light. Turn toward this
light and the shadows falls behind you.
151
Plan for Success
152
Determine Objectives
Take the lead by convening all the key
stakeholders in your charitys website. Make sure
you have representation from at least the
following areas
  • Together, agree on what exactly you want the
    website to accomplish. Make a list and prioritize
    it.
  • This is easier said than done but dont skip this
    step . . . even if it takes months to reach an
    agreement internally.
  • Heres an example of a list of objectives for
    your nonprofit website
  • Raise Money
  • Media Relations
  • Get Volunteers
  • Educate Public
  • Build Relations

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Determine Baseline Metrics
We value what we measure. After you have
prioritized your strategic objectives, determine
how you are going to measure success. Based on
past web site performance, decide on realistic
goals for each objective. If you decide not to
measure an objective then lower its level of
priority. However, most activities can be
measured either by return on investment (ROI)
and/or return on mission (ROM).
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Agree on Ownership
It doesnt really matter what the number one
strategic objective is for your website . . .
Just make sure the people with the responsibility
have the proper authority to achieve success. If
I were you, Id want to know that someone is
waking up everyday thinking about what new and
exciting connections they can make online to
further your cause. Do you have that someone in
place?
When you identified your charitys strategic
objectives, which one became the top priority? If
it was to raise money then put the fundraisers
in charge of your website. Did educate the
public about your cause come out as the top?
Then put the program experts in charge. Is your
Web site primarily for the purpose of worldwide
communication? Then put your experts in
technology in charge.
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Clarify Who You Want to Reach
Who is your target audience? What groups of
people are you wanting to reach online? What are
the psycho/demographic profiles of these people?
Make a list of the types of people you want to
attract to your Web site.
Let your Web site strategic objectives guide you
in understanding the type of groups you need in
order to accomplish each objective.
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Match Goals to Target Audiences
Having a thorough understanding of who it is
going to take to achieve each and every
fundraising goal is critical to your
organizations success.
Each charity has specific designated fundraising
goals that relate directly back to funding
various programs.
Rebuilding Lebanon Multi-Channel Campaign
Fundraising Objective
Target Audiences
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Determine What Action
For each target audience, ask yourself, what
action do I want each group to take?
Do this over and over again for each identified
group of people that you are attempting to
attract to your website.
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CFO is not a Marketer
There is a principle in fundraising, the more
specific you are in telling a donor what their
money will do, the more money that donor will
give you. Which is more compelling to you?
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Present Fundraising Offers
The Fundraising Offer Equation
Almost every single successful fundraising effort
Ive seen has a compelling offer at the core of
its strategy. Sadly the reverse is true as well .
. . the fundraising efforts that fail either do
not have an offer at all or it is presented from
the least inspirational perspective.
105 1,000,000 26 12,000 children a
year O Offer P Program B Budget
(Annual) A Administrative C Cost L
Lives I Impacted T Time
Education is empowerment and that is why I feel
good knowing that with every gift of 105 I can
send one African child to school for an entire
year.
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Tell Stories
The best way to inspire people to your cause is,
through words and imagery, to tell a story that
encompasses the brand promise of your
organization. You see how to incorporate the
brand promise into a story?
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Understand the Donor Context
Contextual Fundraising is a strategy that meets
the objectives of a donor and charity
simultaneously. Its the process of designing
experiences around four classifications of donors
to inspire giving
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Do Good Donors
Make sure your content is timely. If a disaster
strikes and your charity responds then create a
noticeable banner ad on your homepage. This way
people can quickly donate without having to weed
through a bunch of stuff they dont have time to
read.
Do Good donors are attracted to banner ads that
present urgent needs. Showcase your brand promise
in a banner ad on your homepage.
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Make A Difference Donors
Allow people who love your organization the most
to inspire their family and friends. I dare say
you might be able to move mountains with such a
powerful force of energy behind you.
Help your friends make statement about what they
value and how they see the world. Tap into the
power of social networking centered on your cause.
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Shared Mission Donors
What are your organizations guiding
principles? What are the 3 or 4 things you value
most? Shared Mission donors select their
charities the same way they do political
candidates and parties ? aligning with those with
whom they share similar beliefs.
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Shared Vision Donors
Shared Vision donors are your most loyal
constituents. These people believe in your big
idea and want to help accomplish it.
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DNA of Online Giving
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Establish Marketing Funnels
  • Marketing funnels are simply path ways you create
    on your Web site for people to take.
  • Most likely people arrive at your Web site either
    organically or through some intentional marketing
    strategy you created. Well, marketing funnels are
    tools to help you answer three basic questions
    once people land on your website
  • What do I want this person to do?
  • How am I going to get them to do it?
  • How am I going to measure my effectiveness?

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Compel to Convert
You must create a sense of urgency and in doing
so you will be compelling people to click through
your path of persuasion. Why must I give at this
very moment? What will possibly happen if your
charity does not get enough money for this
program? Just adding a link on your website with
a command of some kind will not win the day.
This is not a persuasion strategy.
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Marketing Funnel for Objective
170
Contextual Fundraising
Do Good Donor
Make A Difference Donor
Shared Mission Donor
Shared Vision Donor
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Focus Fast
You only have seconds to tell your story . . .
Your brand promise, so dont major on the
minor. Forget your nonprofits 30-second
elevator speech because on the Internet thats
an eternity. Get to the point fast . . . Focus
on your big idea.
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Explain What Makes You Unique
In North America alone, there are over 1.4
million charities. You must articulate your
unique attributes in order to inform the
potential donor why you instead of some other
worthy nonprofit.
I hate the thought of breaking up a family. Just
because they may find themselves homeless is not
a good reason . . . that is why I give.
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Group Content
The fewer navigation options the better,
especially on the your charitys homepage. Also,
you want to maintain consistent navigation on
each page to ensure no one gets lost.
Keep in mind your Web site objectives when
deciding on your universal navigation. Effective
navigation orients and directs people to achieve
your and their objectives simultaneously.
Its frustrating when I can not find what I am
looking for on your Web site.
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Transform Passion into Action
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Involvement Strategies
E-Newsletter
Testimonials
Online Store
Calendar of Events
Multi-Channel
Stories
Idea Bank
Viral Marketing
Virtual Tour
Fundraising
Podcast
Social Network
FAQ Database
News Updates / Press Releases
Contests
Banner Ads
E-Learning
Photo Gallery
Video
Blog
Volunteer
Event Registration
Forum / Message Boards
White Papers
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Seize Your Keyword and Phrases
How does your target audience think about your
cause . . . what words do they use to search for
information online about the activities of your
charity.Position your charity first in the
minds of your target audience and watch your
search engine ranks soar.
There is a war for words taking place on the
Internet.What are the top five or six
statements you want to own online?
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Write Down Top 5 or 6 Things
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Join Conversations
Did you know at this very moment, there are
thousands of people engaged in conversations
about issues that your charity addresses? They
are asking and answering questions . . . filling
niches that seemingly no one or no organization
is doing. Most likely these people dont even
know your organization exists.
Your charity is one of the premier authorities on
creating solutions . . . this is why your
nonprofit exists.
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Post Your Orgs Videos
Many nonprofits have miles of video footage about
their cause that can be repurposed and tagged,
just as in the case of other content, in order
for people discover your wonderful work.The
more videos you post to various Web sites, with
links back to your charity's site, helps your
organization go up in Search Engine placements.
These are but a few of the Web sites you can
share your video stories in order to drive people
to your Web site.
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Social Media Strategy
Nonprofit
182
Integration
183
Integration
  • What does Creating an Integrated Web Strategy
    mean?
  • Making the most of all of your communication
    efforts
  • Organizationally getting teams together that
    would not normally work together breaking down
    the silos
  • Using one media to boost results of another and
    vice versa

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Integration
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Why Integrate
  • Why do you need an Integrated Web Strategy?
  • Competition for Mind Share
  • More complex systems
  • Diversity in constituents
  • Ability to utilize the medium
  • Better return on your investment (ROI)

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Implement Integration
  • You dont need to make sure that every media is
    touched for an integrated web strategy
  • Print, web, radio, TV
  • Some campaigns can include a banner, email, DM
    insert or piece, or everything
  • You must crossover at least two mediums to
    integrate
  • Are your IT/Communications and Development groups
    sharing notes and plans?

187
Beyond Integration
In order to truly stay ahead of the innovative
curve you must move the Internet from after- to
forethought in your mind. As you approach your
next campaign, think online communication first
and not last. The Internet will become centric
to all marketing.
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Donor Profile
Psychographic
Demographic
Gender Age Income Material Status Wealth
Interests Hobbies Religion Magazines Vacations
Mrs. Donor
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The Campions How groups move to
our top shelf
  • 1) Relevance
  • 2) Responsiveness
  • 3) Respect
  • 4) Our experience with you

190
4. Our experience with you
  • Mix it up
  • Let us in
  • Stewardship to us means communication
  • Forget the 7 times rule

191
Keeping us as donors
  • Motivation
  • Continually update your relevance
  • Build community with me
  • Vision keep me hopeful

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What do you need to do for PLUMS?
  • Think big and believe
  • Help me keep learning
  • Understand my world view
  • Ask great questions and LISTEN
  • Stand out
  • Deliver on your promise
  • Provide Great stewardship
  • Karen Osborne, Major Gifts, IFC Congress,
    Amsterdam, 2005

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5 things we want to know about youevery year
  • Annual Case for support to be updated EVERY year
    1-2 pages maximum including your letterhead and
    list of board members!
  • The Bigger Picture Whats happening in the issue
    you deal with?
  • What are you doing about it?
  • Whats changed for better or worse
  • What do you need and why? Why should I think
    about giving more?
  • What role does philanthropy play in your budget?
  • Remind me that I am part of a community of donors
    that can make a difference

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Give us meaningful community
  • Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful
    people could change the world. Indeed, it's the
    only thing that ever has.
  • Margaret Mead

195
Internal rallying cry
  • Pay attention to what is really motivating your
    troops.......

Building on our Promise (We will always be here
no matter what you try to do to us!)
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TBTGOGGI
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Visions are changing
  • In the past
  • Give to a Legacy of Caring.
  • Blah, blah, blah
  • Today

201
Vision Sample
  • Support a new clinical research center
  • IS NOT A VISION
  • We Will Eliminate cancer as a major cause of
    human suffering and death
  • IS A VISION

202
  • VISION WITHOUT RESOURCES
  • IS LUNACY
  • --Some college president somewhere

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Professional Development Invest in yourself
  • Donors give to real peoplenot desperate devo
    officers!
  • Invest in your own professional development
  • Relationships take energymake sure you have
    some!
  • Balance your life (and have a life!)
  • Keep perspective

204
Transparency and ethics are our cornerstone
values
  • Our compass
  • Mission and Vision
  • Our North Star
  • AFP Code of ethics
  • Giving often based on relative efficiency
  • Donors forgive, but they never forget

Source Lorna Somers, IFC Congress, Amsterdam,
2005
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Your personal legacy
  • The eyes of the future are looking back at us
    and they are praying for us to see beyond our own
    times. They are kneeling with clasped hands that
    we might act with restraint, leaving room for the
    life that is destined to come.
  • --Terry Tempest Williams

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  • Bottom linethere is too much potential and our
    missions are to important to do it alone.
  • You are an important profession Good
    Development officers
  • will change the world.

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Getting the Brand Experience Right The End
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