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Title: The Photomontage Past, Present, Future


1
The PhotomontagePast, Present, Future
2
Shawn M. McKinneyUT-AustinSchool of
JournalismAEJMC San Antonio 2005
3
Part 1A History of The Photomontage
4
  • Make picture of kaleidoscope.
  • William H. Fox Talbot(note dated February 18,
    1839)
  • Susan Sontag. On Photography (Anchor Books, 1977)

5
Early Days
  • The manipulation of the photograph is as old as
    photography.
  • Combining photographs or negatives is found in
    both low and high art contexts.
  • The practice of cutting and reassembling
    photographic images is found in old comic
    postcards, photograph albums, screens, etc.

6
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7
Untitled(direct contact print)William Henry Fox
Talbot1835
8
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10
(postcards)designer unknown1902, 1914
11
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12
The Two Ways of Life(composite photograph)Oscar
Rejlander1857
13
  • Made up of more than 30 separate negatives.
  • Aligned with classical academic painting
  • epic in scope
  • elaborate composition
  • allegorical aspirations

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15
Nor Easter (composite photograph)H.P.
Robinson1890
16
  • Common practice in 19th C. to use combination
    printing, add figures to a landscape photo, print
    in a different sky.
  • In early photography, it was almost impossible to
    obtain, in one exposure, both sharp foreground
    detail and a desirable sky.

17
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19
Photomontage
  • Little agreement over definition among either
    artists or historians.

20
  • The process (and result) of making a composite
    picture by cutting and joining a number of
    photographs.
  • Wikepedia.com (Web site)

21
  • The technique of making a picture by assembling
    pieces of photographs, often with other graphic
    material.
  • A composite picture produced by this technique.
  • The American Heritage Dictionary, Fourth Edition.
    (Dell Publishing, 2001)

22
  • Technique of combining or superimposing
    photographic images from different sources in
    order to produce a new and surprising
    relationship between the original components.
  • Graphic Design and Designers. Alan and Isabella
    Livingston (World of Art, 1992)

23
  • Photomontage cut-and-paste combination of image
    fragments to produce new compositions. This
    creole of photography and graphic design was
    popular among European artists of the 1920s and
    1930s.
  • The Reconfigured Eye. William J. Mitchell (MIT
    Press, 1992)

24
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25
Da-Dandy(photomontage)Hannah Höch1919- used
as the cover of Photomontage,by Dawn Ades (World
of Art, 1986)
26
  • In Da-Dandy, photographic fragments representing
    woman in the context of fashion are recombined
    to form a mans head creating the sort of
    subversive ambiguity which is the central
    strategy of this art.
  • Ades, Photomontage, pp. 159

27
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28
  • The term photomontage was invented right after
    WWI, by the Berlin Dada group.
  • Hannah Höch
  • Raoul Hausmann
  • John Heartfield
  • George Grosz

29
Dada
  • Born in protest against WWI
  • Originally Swiss literary movement
  • Dada means a childs hobbyhorse
    (French/German dictionary)

30
  • Berlin Dadaists
  • revolutionary political beliefs
  • raise public awareness
  • effect social change

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32
Cut with the Cake-Knife(photomontage)Hannah
Höch1919
33
  • Dada photomontage invented within context of
    though in opposition to collage.
  • The name photomontage was chosen, clearly, to
    distance the two activities.

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35
The Art Critic(photomontage)Raoul Hausmann1919
36
  • Raoul Hausmann This term photomontage
    translates our aversion at playing the artist
    rather, we think of ourselves as engineers
    meant to construct, to assemble our works.
  • Ades, Photomontage, pp. 12

37
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38
Tatlin at Home(photomontage)Raoul Hausmann1920
39
  • As early as 1917, John Heartfield began to form a
    new style of montage, out of experiments with
    collage and typography.
  • Ades, Photomontage, pp. 22

40
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41
Typocollage(collage)John Heartfield1917
42
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43
German Natural History Metamorphosis(photomontag
e)John Heartfield1934
44
  • On one cover for AIZ (no. 16, 1934), Heartfield
    implied that the Weimar caterpillar Ebert finally
    hatched into the Deaths Head Moth, Hitler.
  • Heartfield continues to inspire and influence new
    generations of designers and activists.

45
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46
Cubism Futurism
  • Earlier examples of the use of photographs in art
    are to be found in certain Cubist and Futurist
    collages.

47
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48
Glass and Bottle of Suze(collage)Pablo
Picasso1912
49
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50
Breakfast(collage)Juan Gris1914
51
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52
Bicycle Wheel(sculpture)Marcel Duchamp1913
53
Ready-Mades
  • To Marcel Duchamp, Dadas most articulate
    spokesman, art and life were both processes of
    random chance and willful choice.
  • Philip Meggs. A History of Graphic Design (Van
    Nostrand Reinhold, 1983)

54
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55
The Spirit of Our Time(sculpture)Raoul
Hausmann1919
56
  • Clear parallels can be detected between
    photomontages and constructed art objects such as
    ready-mades which became a prominent feature
    of Dada, and (later) Surrealism.

57
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58
Health through Sport(photomontage)Max Ernst1920
59
Surrealism
  • Max Ernst one of first artists to explore
    disorienting power of combined photographic
    images, and possibilities of transformations of
    objects, bodies, landscapes.
  • For Ernst, collage was the conquest of the
    irrational.
  • Ades, Photomontage, pp. 111

60
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61
Untitled (or) The Murderous Aeroplane(collage)Ma
x Ernst1920
62
  • Frequently Ernst intensified the poetic power of
    collages with his choice of inscriptions or
    titles.

63
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64
Gun with Alphabet Squares(photogram or
rayogram)Man Ray1924
65
  • Man Rays photograms (or rayograms) were
    another influence on the photomontage.
  • Photograms require neither film nor a camera.
    Instead, they rely on a light source and
    emulsion-coated paper to capture ghostly, 3-D
    images of physical objects.

66
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67
Metropolis(photomontage)Paul Citroën1923
68
Futurism Constructivism
  • The violent changes of scale and simultaneous
    perceptions of different things implicit in the
    vision of the Futurist city were ideal matter for
    photomontage.
  • Ades, Photomontage, pp. 99

69
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70
Untitled(photomontage)Aleksandr
Rodchenko1923- from a series of photomontages
created to accompany Mayakovskys poem, About
This (1923)
71
  • Rodchenkos photomontages were among the first
    imaginative works in this medium in Russia.
  • The core of Mayakovskys poem is a demand for
    individual expression within a revolutionary
    society.

72
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73
  • The richness of the poem is difficult to
    encompass in a single picture, but with
    counterpoint and juxtaposition Rodchenko creates
    marvelous equivalents.
  • Ades, Photomontage, pp. 82

74
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75
The Cinematic Eye
  • Early development of Soviet cinema has close
    parallels with photomontage.
  • Use in film of intercutting to disrupt time and
    space, as well as alternating close-ups and long
    shots, overlapping motifs, using double exposures
    and/or split-screen projections all have
    equivalents in photomontage.
  • Hausmann described photomontage as static film.
  • Ades, Photomontage, pp. 87

76
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77
Kino Eye(film poster, with photomontage)Aleksand
r Rodchenko1924
78
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79
The Constructor(photomontage)El Lissitzky1924
80
  • The Constructor was made by a combination of
    superimposed negatives and direct exposure.
  • Literally integrated artists eye and hand
  • Circle and rectangles on graph paper represent
    abstract basis of Constructivist art.

81
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82
Foreign Beauty(photomontage)Hannah Höch1929
83
The Body
  • Early Surrealist objects might function
    analogically, or invoke fetishism whereas
    photomontage could work more directly on the
    human body.
  • Dada photomontages disrupt, truncate or replace
    parts of the body, rendering the familiar strange.

84
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85
Untitled(photomontage)Raoul Hausmann1947
86
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87
Adolph the Superman Swallows Gold and Spouts
Junk(photomontage)John Heartfield1932
88
John Heartfield
  • German artist whose politically charged
    photomontages were banned in his home country
    during the Nazi regime.

89
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90
A Pan-German(photomontage)John Heartfield1933
91
  • In A Pan-German, a photograph of the Pan-German
    leader of the brownshirts, Julius Streicher
    (editor of Stürmer, an anti-Semitic newspaper),
    is placed over a photograph from the Stuttgart
    police archives.
  • Streicher stands heedless of the blood under his
    feet, symbol of repressive authority, born of and
    nourished by violence.

92
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93
  • Heartfield created a different version of this
    work, to which he added a third character, an
    Italian officer holding a bloody knife.
    Accordingly, Heartfield changed the name of the
    photomontage, to Like Brother, Like Murderer,
    helping expand its meaning and significance.

94
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95
  • Heartfields Like Brother, Like Murderer
    achieves its barbed clarity by fitting the three
    characters into an easily understood
    stereotypical pattern of standing victors and
    fallen, bloodied victim one that is found both
    in Greek vase paintings and in boxing pictures on
    the sports pages of newspapers.
  • Mitchell. The Reconfigured Eye, pp. 217

96
  • Born (1891) as Helmut Herzfeld.
  • Changed name to protest WWI feigned madness to
    avoid returning to service.
  • Used photomontage as a political medium, used
    images from political journals.
  • Organized 1st International DADA Fair, Berlin,
    1920.

97
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98
Millions Stand Behind Me(photomontage)John
Heartfield1932
99
  • Heartfield renders Hitlers salute ambiguous
    from Nazi salute, intended to thrill and terrify
    millions, it becomes a deceitfully open, grasping
    hand. An opposition is set up between the
    apparent and the real significance of the salute,
    which is de-mystified and deprived of its
    rhetorical power.
  • Ades, Photomontage, pp. 49-50

100
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101
Five Fingers Has the Hand(photomontage)John
Heartfield1928
102
  • Sergei Tretyakov A photomontage need not
    necessarily be a montage of photos. it can be
    photo and text, photo and color, photo and
    drawing.
  • John Heartfield A photograph can, by the
    addition of an unimportant spot of color, become
    a photomontage, a work of art of a special kind.

103
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104
Control(poster)Red Dragon Print Collective1975
105
  • From a set of three posters created to protest
    the setting up of control units in British
    prisons.
  • Lower right-hand picture is reminiscent of
    Heartfields I am a Cabbage (in which a head is
    wrapped in newspaper).

106
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107
I am a Cabbage(photomontage)John Heartfield1930
108
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109
Cover(photo-illustration, magazine)Adbusters
magazineMike Simons (cover image and
handwriting) and Kalle Lasn (art direction)2002
110
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111
Defended to Death(poster)Peter Kennard1982
112
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113
Untitled (I am your slice of life)(photographic
silkscreen on vinyl)Barbara Krugerc. 1981
114
  • She doesnt typically employ photomontage
    techniques directly nevertheless, one can
    clearly see a strategic connection between the
    work of contemporary artist Barbara Kruger and
    that of John Heartfield.

115
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116
Untitled (You invest in the divinity)(photographi
c silkscreen on vinyl)Barbara Krugerc. 1982
117
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118
Untitled (Your body is a battleground)(photograph
ic silkscreen on vinyl)Barbara Krugerc. 1989
119
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120
Just what is it that makes todays homes so
different, so appealing?(collage)Richard
Hamilton1956
121
Pop Art
  • The collage and montage of photographs (not on
    the whole in the darkroom) are among the staples
    of the post-war Pop artists.
  • Ades, Photomontage, pp. 140

122
Part IISurrealism and Beyond
123
Surrealism and Beyond
  • The practice of photomontage continued during and
    after the war with a new generation of Surrealist
    artists, and also with artists who did not
    necessarily owe any particular allegiance to the
    movement. The most interesting include Jerry
    Uelsmann.
  • Ades, Photomontage, pp. 140

124
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125
Untitled(photomontage)Jerry Uelsmann1984
126
  • The camera is a fluid way of encountering that
    other reality.
  • Jerry Uelsmann

127
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128
Le Blanc Seing(painting)Rene Magritte1965
129
  • The mind loves the unknown. It loves images
    whose meaning is unknown, since the meaning of
    the mind itself is unknown.
  • Rene Magritte

130
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131
The Temptation of the Angel(photomontage)Pedro
Meyer1991
132
  • In contrast to images that announce their
    synthetic nature such as Jerry Uelsmanns
    surreal combination prints Meyers images
    seduce us with real evidence, pictorial facts,
    visual puns, ironic juxtapositions, and political
    narratives.
  • Jonathan Green. Aperture, no. 136, pp. 33

133
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134
Peachblossom Highway, 11-18 April 1986
2(photocollage)David Hockney1986
135
  • Television is becoming a collage there are so
    many channels that you move through them making a
    collage yourself. In that sense, everyone sees
    something a bit different.
  • David Hockney

136
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137
Untitled / Dresshook(photomontage)Shelly J.
Smith1992
138
  • I use family archives, historical and personal
    imagery, as well as found objects that I
    digitally transform. The result is a composite
    image with one distinctive voice.
  • Shelly J. Smith. Aperture, no. 136, pp. 20

139
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140
Portrait of Wouter Kardol(photomontage)Nanette
Hoogslag (artist)1992
141
  • The artist chose to create an atmospherical
    portrait based on his character rather than a
    more conventional head and shoulders
    photograph. The sitter brought an artichoke with
    him as a prop this later became an integral part
    of the final image.
  • Simon Larbalestier. The Art and Craft of Collage
    (Chronicle Books, 1995)

142
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143
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144
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145
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146
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147
New Artists Breaking Out(photomontage)Andrzej
Klimowski1987
148
  • New Artists Breaking Out was created from
    black and white photocopies. The artist
    repeatedly enlarged and photocopied these until
    the background started to break up and take on
    the appearance of brushmarks.
  • Larbalestier. Collage, pp. 73

149
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150
The Love Series(photomontage)Emma Parker1990
151
  • An old engraving and an assortment of objects
    are the subject for this still-life photomontage.
    The artist printed the image onto watercolor
    paper using the photographic emulsion, Liquid
    Light.
  • Larbalestier. Collage, pp. 97

152
Part IIIMusic The Avant-Garde
153
  • suddenly a narrative had entered our project.
    Its LA, its a riot, its Nero fiddling while
    Rome burns, and the juxtaposition of two images
    fire and water becomes the Los Angeles
    experience.
  • Peter Seville
  • Rick Poynor. Interview Peter Seville. Eye
    magazine (no. 17, vol. 5, Summer 1995)

154

155
New Order Republic(album cover)Peter Saville
(art direction and design)London Records1993
156

157
The Beatles Revolver(album cover)Klaus Voorman
(art direction and design)c. 1966
158

159
Jet Get Born(album cover)Greg Gigendad Burke
(art direction and design)Phil Knot
(photography) June Kim (illustration)c. 2003
160
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161
The Beatles Sgt. Peppers Lonely Hearts Club
Band(album cover)Peter Blake (art direction and
design)Michael Cooper (photography)1967
162
  • All living people depicted on the cover were
    asked permission. Mae West refused. The
    statuesque blonde near the front on the cover is
    Diana Dors, a Mae West look-alike from the '50s.
  • SongFacts.com (Web site)
  • Several people who were intended to be included
    on the cover never made it, including Elvis,
    Hitler and Jesus.
  • BeatlesTracks.com (Web site)

163
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164
Frank Zappa and The Mothers of InventionWere
Only In It For The Money(album cover)Carl
Schenkel (art direction and design) Jerrold
Schatzberg (photography)1968
165
  • The very distinctive Sgt. Peppers cover has
    been copied several times.
  • BeatlesTracks.com (Web site)

166
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167
The Simpsons The Yellow Album(album
cover)designer unknown1968
168
  • The cover shot, assorted pictures of circus
    freaks, is not a collage but a photo Robert
    Frank took in 1950 of the wall of a tattoo parlor
    The comparison to the notorious Stones
    jet-setting tax exiles, cocaine-fueled satyrs and
    perpetual outsiders is clear. An identical
    layout on the back cover features Frank's photos
    of the Stones themselves, shot on L.A.s seedy
    Main Street. The layout perfectly complements
    the sound of Exile.
  • SuperSeventies.com (Web site)

169
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170
U2 Achtung Baby(album cover)Steve Averill,
Shaughn McGrath (design)Anton Corbijn
(photography)1991
171
(No Transcript)
172
Pearl Jam No Code(album cover)Barry Ament,
Chris McGann, Jerome Turner(art direction and
design)Jeff Ament, Lance Mercer
(photography)1996
173
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174
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175
Led Zeppelin Physical Graffiti(album cover,
with optional inserts)Mike Doud, Peter Corriston
(art direction and design) Elliot Erwitt, B.P.
Fallen, Roy Harper (photography) Dave Heffernan
(illustration)1975
176
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177
(No Transcript)
178
Led Zeppelin Presence(album cover, cd
booklet)Hipgnosis and Hardie (art direction and
design)1976
179
(No Transcript)
180
The Rolling Stones Metamorphosis(album
cover)Al Steckler, Richard Roth (art direction
and design)1975 (recorded 1964-69)
181
(No Transcript)
182
Joni Mitchell Hejira(album cover)Joni Mitchell
(art direction and design)Norman Seeff, Joel
Bernstein (photography)1976
183
  • I was a painter first, says Joni Mitchell.
    So when I began to record albums, I thought
    album art was a great way to keep both careers
    alive. The Hejira cover represented the work
    pretty well. The front art was stripped
    together from a number of different photos, which
    resulted in what Mitchell calls an incredibly
    difficult printing job. A studio portrait by
    Norman Seeff was combined with shots by Joel
    Bernstein taken on a frozen lake a classic
    Hans Brinker, as Mitchell puts it.
  • SuperSeventies.com (Web site)

184
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185
Richard Ashcroft Human Condition(album
cover)Richard Ashcroft (art direction and
design)Nadav Kander, Max Dodson, Marc Marot
(photos)2002
186
(No Transcript)
187
Thelonious Monk Brilliant Corners(album
cover)Paul Bacon (art direction and design)1956
188
(No Transcript)
189
Charlie Parker Birds Best Bop(album
cover)Patricia Lie (art direction and
design)Herman Leonard (cover photo)1995
190
(No Transcript)
191
Joe Lovano Trio Fascination(album cover)P.R.
Brown (art direction and design) Jimmy Katz
(photography)MacDavid Henderson
(illustration)1998
192
(No Transcript)
193
J.J. Johnson Heroes(album cover)GuilioTurturro
(art direction and design) William Claxton,
Jimmy Katz (photography)MacDavid Henderson
(illustration)1998
194
(No Transcript)
195
Jason Moran Facing Left(album cover)P.R. Brown
(art direction and design)Michael Wong
(photography)2000
196
(No Transcript)
197
Jason Moran Black Stars(album cover)P.R. Brown
(photography, art direction and design)2001
198
(No Transcript)
199
Scolohofo (John Scofield, Joe Lovano, Dave
Holland, Al Foster) Oh!(album cover)Eli Wolf
(art direction) Gordon H. Jee (creative
direction) Jimmy Katz (photography) Burton
Yount (package design)2002
200
(No Transcript)
201
Brad Mehldau Largo(album cover)Lawrence
Azerrad (art direction and design)Tina Tyrell
(photography)2002
202
(No Transcript)
203
Brad Mehldau Anything Goes(album
cover)Lawrence Azerrad (art direction and
design)Warren Darius Aftahi (photography)2004
204
(No Transcript)
205
Matthew Shipp Nu Bop(album cover)Cynthia Fetty
(art direction and design)2002
206
(No Transcript)
207
William Parker Scrapbook(album cover)Cynthia
Fetty (art direction and design) Lisa
Christiansen, Cynthia Fetty (photography)2003
208
(No Transcript)
209
John Elliot Gardner, Orchestre Révolutionnaire
Beethoven Symphonies No. 3 and 5(album
cover)Tina Lauffer (art direction and
design)1994
210
(No Transcript)
211
Vladimir Ashkenazy Shostakovich Piano
Works(album cover)Mark Millington (art
direction and design)2004
212
(No Transcript)
213
Libor Pesck, Czech Philharmonic Orchestra
Dvorák Symphony No. 2(album cover)Nick Bell
(art direction and design)Michael Wildsmith
(photography)1995
214
(No Transcript)
215
Gil Shaham, Paul Meyer, Jian Wang, Myung-Whun
Chung Messiaen Quartet for the End of
Time(album cover)Hartmut Pfeiffer (art
direction and design)John Ritter
(photography)2000
216
(No Transcript)
217
Modest Mouse The Moon Antarctica(album
cover)Mary Maurer (art direction)Simon
Labalestier (cover photography)2000
218
(No Transcript)
219
(No Transcript)
220
Radiohead OK Computer(album cover cd booklet
spread)Stanley Donwood (art direction and
design)1997
221
(No Transcript)
222
(No Transcript)
223
Radiohead Amnesiac(album cover, cd
booklet)Stanley Donwood (art direction and
design)2001
224
(No Transcript)
225
(No Transcript)
226
Radiohead Hail to the Thief(album cover cd
booklet spread)Stanley Donwood (art direction
and design)2003
227
(No Transcript)
228
(No Transcript)
229
Beck Odelay(album cover cd booklet
spread)Beck Hansen, Robert Fisher (art direction
and design) Ludwig (cover photo)1996
230
(No Transcript)
231
Prefuse 73 One Word Extinguisher(album
cover)GHavisualagency (art direction and
design)2003
232
(No Transcript)
233
Björk Vespertine(album cover)Inez van
Lamsweerde, Vinoodh Matadin, M/M ltParisgt (art
direction and design)2001
234
(No Transcript)
235
(No Transcript)
236
Leona Naess Comatized(album cover disc
label)Shop/NYC/ (art direction and design)
Chris Floyd, Jack Pierson (photography)2000
237
(No Transcript)
238
(No Transcript)
239
Bill Evans The Best of Bill Evans on
Verve(album cover disc label)Patricia Lie (art
direction and design)Chuck Stewart (cover
photograph)1995
240
(No Transcript)
241
(No Transcript)
242
Beck Sea Change(album cover cd booklet
spread)Kevin Reagan, Beck Hansen (art direction
and design) Jeremy Blake (art work) Autumn De
Wilde (cover photo)2002
243
(No Transcript)
244
The Pixies Doolittle(album cover)Vaughan
Oliver (art direction and design)Simon
Larbalestier (cover photograph)1989
245
(No Transcript)
246
De La Soul Art Official Intelligence Mosaic
Thump(album cover)Kevin Wolahan (art direction
and design)Mo Daoud (photography)2000
247
(No Transcript)
248
Pink Floyd Pulse(album cover and
slipcase)Storm Thorgerson (art direction and
design)1995
249
(No Transcript)
250
RJD2 Since We Last Spoke(album
cover)kiku_at_babyalpaca.org (design) 2004
251
(No Transcript)
252
Four Tet Everything Ecstatic(album
cover)Matthew Cooper (art direction and
design)Jason Evans, Simon Foxion
(photography)2005
253
Part IVAdvertising Editorial
254
  • The dissolution of trust in the photographic
    image could even cause us to abandon photography.
    What would happen if we stopped taking
    photographs?
  • Ben Tibbs
  • This Is Not A Plane Crash. Eye magazine (no.
    17, vol. 5, Summer 1995)

255
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256
The New York Times Book Review(newspaper
supplement, cover)Steven Heller (art direction
and design) Ed Lam (illustration)1999
257
(No Transcript)
258
Untitled(magazine advertisement)Tanqueray
Gindesigner unknown1992
259
(No Transcript)
260
Reading Fiction(magazine illustration)Rolling
StoneStephen Kroninger1996
261
(No Transcript)
262
Untitled(magazine advertisement)Tazo
Teadesigner unknown2004
263
(No Transcript)
264
Chris Rock(newspaper illustration)Show World /
Austin American-Statesmandesigner unknown2004
265
(No Transcript)
266
Tom Craddick and Rick Perry(magazine
illustration)Texas Monthlydesigner unknown2004
267
(No Transcript)
268
Untitled(magazine advertisement)Targetdesigner
unknown2005
269
(No Transcript)
270
Untitled(magazine cover)EyeNick Bell (art
direction and design) 1998
271
(No Transcript)
272
Untitled(magazine cover)EyeNick Bell (art
direction and design) 2000
273
(No Transcript)
274
Untitled(magazine cover)EyeNick Bell (art
direction and design) 2003
275
(No Transcript)
276
Masochism (Guilles Deleuze Coldness and Cruelty
Leopold von Sacher-Masoch Venus in Furs)(book
cover)Bruce Mau (art direction and design)1989
277
(No Transcript)
278
Henri Focillon The Life of Forms in Art(book
cover)Bruce Mau (art direction and design)1992
279
(No Transcript)
280
Lorraine Daston, ed. Things That Talk(book
cover)Bruce Mau (art direction and design)2004
281
(No Transcript)
282
Neil Postman Technopoly(book cover)Statoff
Cohen (art direction and design)Mark Hill
(black-and-white photography)1992
283
(No Transcript)
284
James Elkins The Object Stares Back(book
cover)Vaughn Andrews (art direction and
design)1996
285
(No Transcript)
286
Francis Fukuyama Our Posthuman Future(book
cover)Lauren Panepinto (art direction and
design)Peter Sherrard / Getty Images (cover
photograph)1992
287
(No Transcript)
288
Jean Renoir The Rules of the Game (1939)(dvd
cover)Christine Ditrio (art direction)Lucien
S.Y. Yang (menu and package design)2004
289
(No Transcript)
290
Volker Schlöndorff The Tin Drum (1979)(dvd
cover)Christine Ditrio, Neil Kellerhouse (art
direction)Neil Kellerhouse (menu and package
design)2004
291
(No Transcript)
292
David Cronenberg Naked Lunch (1991)(dvd
cover)Christine Ditrio, Neil Kellerhouse (art
direction)Neil Kellerhouse (menu and package
design)2003
293
(No Transcript)
294
George Lucas, Unmasked(magazine
cover)WiredMichael Elins (cover
photography)Frederico Gutiérrez-Schott (design
direction)2005
295
(No Transcript)
296
What Color Is Black?(magazine cover)NewsweekAnt
hony Barboza (photography) Kandy Littrell (art
direction)1995
297
(No Transcript)
298
The Strange New World of the Internet(magazine
cover)TimeJames Porto (design) Linda L.
Freeman (art direction)1994
299
(No Transcript)
300
6ft from a Massacre(tabloid cover)Todaydesigner
unknown1994
301
  • A front-page news story about a crashing plane
    which narrowly missed a Coventry housing estate
    digitally montages a cruising jet and a damaged
    roof. The news picture ceases to be reportage
    in the objective sense and becomes a form of
    illustration.
  • Ben Tibbs.This Is Not A Plane Crash. Eye
    magazine, no. 17, vol. 5, Summer 1995, pp. 72

302
(No Transcript)
303
Never been there? (newspaper illustration)Austin
American-Statesmandesigner unknown2005
304
(No Transcript)
305
Jeopardy!(newspaper illustration)Austin
American-StatesmanJason Whaley2005
306
(No Transcript)
307
Willie Nelson(newspaper illustration)Austin
American-StatesmanDon Tate2003
308
(No Transcript)
309
Behold the Brain(newspaper illustration)Austin
American-StatesmanJoe Stafford2003
310
(No Transcript)
311
Anti-Hero(newspaper illustration)Austin
American-StatesmanJoe Stafford2003
312
(No Transcript)
313
War of the Worlds(newspaper illustration)Austin
American-StatesmanDale Roe2005
314
(No Transcript)
315
Consumer Alert(newspaper illustration)Wall St.
JournalRalph Kelliher2005
316
(No Transcript)
317
Upswing(newspaper illustration)Austin
American-Statesmandesigner unknownHa Lam
(photos)2005
318
(No Transcript)
319
10 Years of SXSW Film(newspaper
illustration)Austin Chronicledesigner
unknown2003
320
(No Transcript)
321
Punch?(newspaper illustration)Show World /
Austin American-StatesmanDale Roe2005
322
(No Transcript)
323
Surfing the Future(newspaper illustration)Austin
American-StatesmanJoe Stafford2003
324
  • Protagonists of the institutions of journalism,
    with their interest in being trusted may well
    fight hard to maintain the hegemony of the
    standard photographic image but others will see
    the emergence of digital imaging as a welcome
    opportunity to expose photographys
    construction of the visual world, to deconstruct
    the very ideas of photographic objectivity and
    closure
  • William J. Mitchell. The Reconfigured Eye, pp. 8

325
  • The camera is my tool. Through it I give a
    reason to everything around me.
  • André Kertész
  • Sontag. On Photography, pp. 208

326
  • An interlude of false innocence has passed. We
    have indeed learned to fix shadows, but not to
    secure their meanings or to stabilize their truth
    values they still flicker on the walls of
    Platos cave.
  • Mitchell. Reconfigured, pp. 225
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