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Industry Education Partnerships

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Mississippi State University, Peavey Electronics, & National Science Foundation ... Jere Hess, Peavey Electronics. Long-term impact on education ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Industry Education Partnerships


1
Industry Education Partnerships
  • Bridging the Gap
  • Between the Classroom
  • and the Workplace
  • AAPT 2003 Winter Meeting Austin, TX

2
Learn To Work ESI-9555646
  • Mississippi State University, Peavey Electronics,
    National Science Foundation
  • Teams of physics and technology teachers
  • Experience the workplace
  • Learn workplace skills and values
  • Apply experiences to existing curriculum

3
Research Experiences in Industry ESI-9911885
  • Mississippi State University, Northrop Grumman,
    Tennessee Valley Authority, Red Hills
    Mine,Mississippi Institutions of Higher
    Learnings Fast Forward Mississippi National
    Science Foundation
  • Teams of Science, Mathematics Technology
    Teachers (7-12) experience the workplace

4
Research Experiences in Industry ESI-9911885
  • Experience real work applications of content
  • Learn workplace skills and values
  • Apply experiences to existing curriculum

5
Research Experiences in Industry ESI-9911885
  • Components of REI
  • Four week summer workshop
  • Three weeks in partner industries
  • One week of technology training and industry
    relationships
  • Three day internship in local industry
  • 60 hours of mentoring
  • Experience real work applications of content
  • Learn workplace skills and values
  • Apply experiences to existing curriculum
  • 174 applications for 2002 program 42 spots

6
Research Experiences in Industry ESI-9911885
  • Components of REI
  • Four week summer workshop
  • Three weeks in partner industries
  • One week of technology training and industry
    relationship
  • Three-day internship in local industries
  • 60 hours of mentoring over two-year period
  • 174 applications for 2002 program 42 spots

7
Northrop Grumman Ship Systems - Ingalls
8
Red Hills Mine Ackerman, MS
9
Tennessee Valley Authority - Chattanooga
10
Partnership Components
  • Partnerships should involve all segments of
    education
  • K-12 schools
  • Two-year colleges
  • Four-year colleges
  • Universities

11
Partnership Components
  • Communication
  • Commitment
  • Involvement of all stakeholders in decision
    process

12
Why are partnerships valuable to educators?
  • To learn how changes in the workplace affect the
    role of educators in preparing students for the
    workforce
  • To gain knowledge of todays workplace skills and
    workplace values
  • Survey of 40 Mississippi Delta companies

13
Delta industry survey
14
Delta industry survey
15
Delta industry survey
16
Why are partnerships valuable to educators?
  • To learn real world applications to the
    curriculum
  • To serve as full partners in educational reform
    efforts by business and industry

17
Keys to forming partnerships
  • Prepare for contact with local industry
  • Become acquainted with national, state and local
    initiatives
  • School to Work
  • Business Coalition for Education Reform (BCER)
  • Research School-To-Work initiatives in your area

18
Keys to forming partnerships
  • Research local industries
  • Determine if commitments by local industries
    already exist
  • Research products manufactured locally
  • Determine possible connections to your curriculum
  • Learn the benefits of partnerships to all
    stakeholders
  • http//www.schooltocareer.com/index.html

19
Keys to forming partnerships
  • Develop list of possible areas of involvement of
    industry
  • Identify local industry contact
  • Make an appointment for visit
  • Provide information prior to visit

20
Keys to forming partnerships
  • Industry Visit
  • Be on time and dressed appropriately
  • Plants may have dress codes or regulations
  • Be enthusiastic about partnership and
    opportunities for collaboration
  • Ask what role you can play in developing a
    competent workforce for their company

21
Keys to forming partnerships
  • Industry Visit
  • Provide list of ways in which industry can be
    involved locally
  • Provide list of benefits to industry
  • Thank them for taking valuable time to show you
    their facility
  • Follow up

22
Benefits to industry partners Jere Hess, Peavey
Electronics
  • Long-term impact on education
  • Educators learn the requirements for a competent
    workforce through workplace experiences
  • Internal relations with employees
  • Enhances employee self-esteem
  • Provides opportunity for contributions to
    education

23
Benefits to industry partners Jere Hess, Peavey
Electronics
  • Public Relations
  • Demonstrates concern for and commitment to
    education
  • Possible impact politically on educational policy
  • State, regional and national awards for the
    company

24
Benefits to industry partners Jere Hess, Peavey
Electronics
  • Career opportunities
  • Teachers, students parents become aware of
    local job opportunities
  • Development of basic competencies and workplace
    values
  • Educators learn skills required by employees
    communication skills, computer skills, basic
    mathematics, problem-solving, measurement,
    ability to work with others

25
Areas of industry involvement
  • Teacher and/or student work experiences
  • Industry tours for teachers and students
  • Mentor or contact person for teachers
  • Job skills analyses by teachers
  • Excess or discarded equipment

26
Areas of industry involvement
  • Guest speakers/class presentations
  • Consultants for student projects/activities
  • Financial support for teacher professional
    development or increased academic qualifications
  • Advocates for School-To-Work programs

27
References/Resources
  • BCER. (1999). Improving the quality of teaching
    the business role. On-line Available
    http//www.bcer.org/projres/
  • Committee for Economic Development. (1996).
    American workers and economic change. New York.
  • Leonard, B. (July 1996). From school to work
    partnerships smooth the transition. Human
    Resource Magazine On-line. Available
    http//www.shrm.org/hrmagazine/articles/0796cov.ht

28
References/Resources
  • McKernan, J. R., Jr. (1994). Making the grade.
    Boston Little, Brown.
  • School-To-Work. Key points and findings from
    national evaluations of school to work.
    On-line January 10, 2000. Available
    http///www.stw.ed.gov/research/key.html
  • U.S. Department of Education. (1998). The
    Corporate imperative results and benefits of
    business involvement in education. Washington,
    DC Ballen, J., Casey, J.C., de Kanter, A.

29
References/Resources
  • Business Coalition for Education Reform
  • http//www.bcer.org
  • Center for Science, Mathematics and Technology
  • http//www.csmt.msstate.edu/lw/index.html
  • National Alliance of Business
  • http//www.nab.com

30
References/Resources
  • National Association of Manufacturers
  • http//www.nam.org
  • Peavey Electronics Corporation
  • http//www.peavey.com
  • School-To-Work
  • http//www.stw.ed.gov

31
Sandra H. Harpole
  • Interim Vice President for Research,Director,
    Center for Science, Mathematics and Technology,
    Professor of Physics
  • Mississippi State University
  • P. O. Box 6347
  • MS State, MS 39762
  • 662-325-2922
  • Sharpole_at_research.msstate.edu
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