Sensory Integration Dysfunction in Individuals with Cognitive Disabilities for the Coleman Institute - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Sensory Integration Dysfunction in Individuals with Cognitive Disabilities for the Coleman Institute PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 11501-MGY0O



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Sensory Integration Dysfunction in Individuals with Cognitive Disabilities for the Coleman Institute

Description:

Diane Parham. Bruce Pennington. Nicki Pine. Chip Reichardt. Marty Reite ... Miller and Lane, 2000. What does the term 'Sensory Integration Dysfunction' mean? ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:578
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 54
Provided by: drlucy
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Sensory Integration Dysfunction in Individuals with Cognitive Disabilities for the Coleman Institute


1
Sensory Integration Dysfunction in Individuals
with Cognitive Disabilitiesfor theColeman
Institute WorkshopAspen, COOctober 2001
  • Lucy Jane Miller, Ph.D., OTR
  • Associate Professor of Rehabilitation
  • Medicine and Pediatrics
  • University of Colorado Health
  • Sciences Center
  • Director of STAR Center at
  • The Childrens Hospital, Denver, CO
  • lucymiller_at_frii.com

2
Acknowledgements It Takes a Village!!
  • Roiann Ahn
  • Grace Baranek
  • Judy Benzel-Martin
  • Teresa May Benson
  • Erna Blanche
  • Julie Bonnell
  • Pam Buckley
  • Anita Bundy
  • Janice Burke
  • Sharon Cermak
  • Kelly Church
  • Ellen Cohn
  • Jan Ingebritson
  • Jane Koomar
  • Shelly Lane
  • Mark Laudenslager
  • Zoe Mailloux
  • Shanley Mangeot
  • Kathy McBride
  • Kent McBride
  • Jude McGrath-Clarke
  • Danny McIntosh
  • Laura Meyer
  • Debbie Moulton
  • Andrea Nyhoff
  • Todd Ognibene
  • Wendy Coster
  • Patti Davies
  • Winnie Dunn
  • Pat Fodor
  • Kate Glover
  • Linda Greco-Sanders
  • Kathy Green
  • Becky Greer
  • Ed Goldson
  • Marshall Haith
  • Randi Hagerman
  • Barb Hanft
  • Brian Hinaman

3
It Takes a BIG Village!!
  • Diane Parham
  • Bruce Pennington
  • Nicki Pine
  • Chip Reichardt
  • Marty Reite
  • Gilana Rivkin
  • Don Rojas
  • Sally Rogers
  • Roseann Schaaf
  • Mary Schneider
  • Robin Seger
  • Janelle Sheeder
  • Jodie Simon
  • Susanne Smith Roley
  • Catherine Spence
  • Clare Summers
  • Vivian Shyu
  • Tracy Stackhouse
  • Peter Teale
  • Julie Tourigny
  • Sharen Trunnell
  • Jeff Walker
  • Lisa Waterford
  • Julie Wilbarger
  • www.SInetwork.org

4
  • What is Sensory Integration Dysfunction (DSI)?
  • Is the treatment of DSI effective?
  • Is DSI a valid syndrome?
  • What are the underlying mechanisms of DSI?

5
  • Introduction
  • Definitions and Terminology

6
  • Importance of distinguishing
  • terms for
  • Neuro-physiologic Processes
  • Sensory Integration Functions
  • Sensory Integration Dysfunction (DSI)

7
Neuro-physiologicProcesses vs. Behavioral
Manifestations
  • processes are not observed because they occur at
    the cellular or nervous system level and
  • behavioral manifestations of these processes, can
    be observed in sensory integration functional and
    dysfunctional patterns

8
The minimum intensity of stimulus at periphery
necessary to produce excitation or inhibition.
Peripheral Sensory Threshold
9
Leads to transmission of the electrical or
chemical signal.
Central Sensory Threshold
10
Exists at periphery at receptor level, at the
level of the action potential, and at each
central synapse.
Sensory Threshold
11
Central process in which sensory input from a
single sensory system converges on a cluster(s)
of neurons, together affecting the activity of
the neuron on which they synapse.
Intra-Sensory Integration
12
Central process in which cluster(s) of neurons
receive input from more than one sensory system.
Inter-Sensory Integration
13
A Model to Explain Sensory Integration Terminology
Sensory Processing
14
  • Sensory Detection
  • Awareness of sensation is the conscious
    realization or unconscious awareness of sensation

15
  • Sensation Modulation
  • Function
  • The capacity to regulate and organize the degree,
    intensity, and nature of responses to sensory
    input in a graded and adaptive manner.
  • McIntosh, Miller, Shyu, Hagerman, 1999

16
  • Discrimination of Sensation
  • The ability to discern the qualities,
    similarities, and differences among sensory
    stimuli, including differentiation of the
    temporal or spatial qualities of sensory input.
  • Miller and Lane, 2000

17
  • What does the term Sensory Integration
    Dysfunction mean?

18
Atypical processing of sensory stimuli that is
severe enough to produce significant difficulties
in functional aspects of daily routines and
activities.
Sensory Integration Dysfunction
19
Atypical behavioral responses can occur in
several sensorydomains including
  • Touch
  • Movement
  • Auditory
  • Visual
  • Taste
  • Smell
  • Proprioceptive (position and movement of joints)

20
  • Decreased Social Skills Participation in Play
  • Poor Self-confidence Self Esteem
  • Difficulties with Daily Life Skills at Home
    School
  • Anxiety, Poor Attention, Poor Regulation of
    Reactions to Others
  • Poor Gross, Fine or Sensory Motor Skill
    Development
  • Parham and Mailloux,
    1996

21
Hypothesized Relation among DSI Patterns
Dyspraxia
Sensory Modulation Dysfunction
Other DSI Patterns
Dys
SMD
Other
22
Dyspraxia
  • Difficulty in planning and performing a novel
    (non-habitual) motor act or series of motor
    actions that is severe enough to create
    difficulties in daily routines and activities.

23
Problem in capacity to regulate and organize
responses to sensory input in a graded and
adaptive manner that is severe enough to create
difficulties in daily routines and activities.
Sensory Modulation Dysfunction (SMD)
24
  • Is sensory modulation disorder a unitary
    construct?

25
Types of SMD
  • Over-sensitivity - responses to sensation are
    greater than those typically demonstrated by
    others under same circumstances
  • Under-sensitivity - responses to sensation are
    less than those typically demonstrated by others
    under same circumstances
  • Passive vs. active responses
  • Differences between sensory systems

26
(No Transcript)
27
Is InterventionEffective?
  • Need for randomized clinical trial to compare
    treatment models

28
Randomized Clinical Trial
29
  • Is SMD a valid syndrome?

30
What is a syndrome?
  • A syndrome is a cluster of symptoms that
    reliably co-occur and identify subtypes of
    patients who are homogeneous.
  • Pennington, 1991, p. 24

31
If a syndrome is valid, it will satisfy tests of
both convergent and discriminant validity across
levels of analysis. Pennington, 1991, p. 24
32
Validating A SyndromeConverged and Divergent
Evidence
  • Etiologies
  • Brain Development
  • Processing Abilities and Symptoms
  • Developmental Trajectory
  • Effects of Treatment

33
Childhood Developmental Disorders Syndrome
Validation
SMD
Depression
Dyspraxia
ADHD
Schizophrenia
FXS
OCD
Autism
Anxiety
Randy Ross, M.D.
34
  • What are the underlying mechanisms in DSI?

35
  • Can we develop a reliable laboratory paradigm to
    measure sensory reactivity?

36
EDR
  • A psychophysiological measure that assesses the
    extent of response to stimuli by measuring
    changes in the electrical properties of the skin.

37
Skin becomes more electrically conductive as a
result of eccrine sweat gland activity which
increases EDR.
38
Eccrine sweat glands are innervated by
cholinergic fibers of the SNS, thus measuring EDR
provides an index of SNS activity.
Andreassi, 1989 Dawson, 1995 Fowles, 1986
39
StartlingThreateningAggressiveDefensive
FeelingsEmotional Events?Sensory Events?
40
Sensory Challenge Protocol
  • Ten contiguous trials in each of five sensory
    systems
  • olfactory (wintergreen oil)
  • auditory (siren)
  • visual (strobe light)
  • tactile (feather on face)
  • vestibular (chair tilted backwards)
  • EDR recorded after each sensation

41
EDR Variables
42
(No Transcript)
43
(No Transcript)
44
Mean Magnitude in Log10(micromhos)for FXS and TYP
Miller et al., 1999
45
Proportion Responding overTrials for FXS and TYP
Miller et al., 1999
46
Mean Amplitude of Mean Peak Across Modalities for
Children with FX and Autism Compared to Typical
Children
Miller et al., 2001
47
Mean Amplitude of Mean Peak for Individuals with
Fragile X Syndrome and Autism in Study 2
48
Subtests of SSP
  • Tactile Sensitivity
  • Taste/Smell Sensitivity
  • Seeks Sensation
  • Auditory Filtering
  • Visual/Auditory Sensation
  • Low Energy / Weak
  • Movement Sensitivity

49
Subtests of SSP
  • Tactile Sensitivity
  • Taste/Smell Sensitivity
  • Und-resp / Seeks Sens
  • Auditory Filtering
  • Visual/Auditory Sensation
  • Low Energy / Weak
  • Movement Sensitivity

50
Short Sensory Profile Ratings for Children with
FXS and Autism Compared to Typical
Children(Aut8 FXS25 TYP25) - 1999
51
  • It may be those who do most, dream most.
  • Stephen Leacock (1869-1944)

52
  • To be conscious that you are ignorant of the
    facts is a great step to knowledge.
  • Benjamin Disraeli (1804-1881)

53
  • The end of science is not to prove a theory, but
    to improve mankind.
  • Manly P. Hall (born 1901)
About PowerShow.com