Why We Need No Child Left Behind In California. And How On Earth Does It Work - PowerPoint PPT Presentation

Loading...

PPT – Why We Need No Child Left Behind In California. And How On Earth Does It Work PowerPoint presentation | free to view - id: 113ed-NzliN



Loading


The Adobe Flash plugin is needed to view this content

Get the plugin now

View by Category
About This Presentation
Title:

Why We Need No Child Left Behind In California. And How On Earth Does It Work

Description:

Kenny Richards, Superintendent, Northern Humboldt Union High School District ... Denise Allen, Kentucky. November 13, 2002, Lexington Herald Leader. Changing ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

Number of Views:175
Avg rating:3.0/5.0
Slides: 109
Provided by: sandra72
Category:

less

Write a Comment
User Comments (0)
Transcript and Presenter's Notes

Title: Why We Need No Child Left Behind In California. And How On Earth Does It Work


1
Why We Need No Child Left Behind In California.
And How On Earth Does It Work?
Russlynn Ali, Director, Education
TrustWest NCLB and Accountability
Breakfast Sponsored by The Achievement Council
and Families in Schools May 18, 2004
2
DONT TURN BACK THE CLOCK!California
Superintendents Standing Up
  • Henry Escobar, Superintendent, Livingston Union
    School District
  • Richard Rodriguez, Superintendent, Luther Burbank
    School District
  • Samuel Johnson Jr, Superintendent, San Mateo
    Union High School District
  • Edward Lee Vargas, Ed.D. Superintendent, Hacienda
    La Puente Unified
  • Santiago Wood, Superintendent, Fresno Unified
  • Rudy Castruita, Ed. D., Superintendent, San Diego
    County Office of Education
  • Edwin Diaz, Superintendent, Gilroy Unified
  • Larry Aceves, Superintendent, Franklin-McKinley
    School District
  • Darline P. Robles, Ph.D., Superintendent, LA
    County Office of Education
  • Jose L. Banda, Superintendent, Planada Unified
  • Magdalena Carrillo Mejia, Superintendent,
    Sacramento City Unified
  • Dr. Bob Fore, Superintendent, Merced Union High
    School District
  • John McIntosh, Superintendent, Belmont-Redwood
    Shores School District
  • Walt L. Hanline, Superintendent, Ceres Unified
  • Paul M. Hewitt, Superintendent, Mother Lode Union
    School District
  • Charles Allen, Superintendent, Richfield
    Elementary School District
  • Francis Lynch, Superintendent, Del Norte County
    Office of Education
  • Dennis C. Tillett, Superintendent, North
    Sacramento School District
  • Judy J. Statler, Superintendent, Pine Ridge and
    Big Creek School Districts

3
California Superintendents Standing Up
  • James B. French, Superintendent, Trinity County
    Office of Education
  • Edward E. Parraz, Superintendent, Denair Unified
  • Christine Lim, Superintendent, San Leandro
    Unified
  • Pat H. Lewis, Superintendent, Coalinga-Huron
    Unified
  • Tom Amelino, Superintendent, Enterprise
    Elementary School District
  • Micheal A. Distefano, Superintendent, Potter
    Valley Community Unified
  • Robert B. Gaskill, Superintendent, Sonora Union
    High School District
  • Jean Pinotti, Superintendent, Latrobe School
    District
  • Leslie M. Anderson, Superintendent, Moreland
    School District
  • Gary Cringan, Superintendent, Menifee Union
    School District
  • Pietro P. Faconti, Superintendent, Hanford Joint
    Union High School District
  • David K. Hughes, Superintendent, Escondido Union
    High School District
  • Douglas P. DeVore, Superintendent, Encinitas
    Union School District
  • Jacquelyn B. Munoz, Superintendent, Aromas-San
    Juan Unified
  • Larry Maw, Superintendent, San Marcos Unified
  • Frank S. Porter, Superintendent, Rio Linda Union
    School District
  • Kenneth L. Larson, Superintendent, Oro Grande
    Elementary School District
  • James A. Fleming, Superintendent, Capistrano
    Unified

4
CA Supts Standing Up
  • Lee Anderson, Superintendent, Merced County
    Office of Education
  • Stan Mollart, Superintendent, McSwain Union ESD
  • Jesse L. Gonzales, Superintendent, Compton
    Unified
  • Larry E. Reider, Superintendent, Kern County
    Office of Education
  • Kent Bechler, Superintendent, Walnut Valley
    Unified
  • Barry W. Cadwallader, Superintendent, Caffey
    Joint Union High School District
  • Dave Cowles, Superintendent, Vista Unified
  • Garth S. Isom, Superintendent, Brawley Union High
    School District
  • Mary Anne H. Mays, Superintendent, Pajaro Valley
    Unified
  • David R. Simons, Superintendent, Chinese Camp
    School District
  • Mark Kemp, Superintendent, Bear Valley Unified
  • Penelope Mertens, Superintendent,
    Hughes-Elizabeth Lakes Union Elementary School
    District
  • Paul A. Cartas, Superintendent, Vallecitos School
    District
  • David R. Kincaid, Superintendent, Silver Valley
    Unified
  • Jeff Seymour, Superintendent, El Monte City
    School District
  • Al Mijares, Superintendent, Santa Ana Unified
    School District
  • Jeffery P. Felix, Superintendent, San Pasqual
    Union School District
  • Don Phillips, Superintendent, Poway Unified

5
CA Supts Standing Up!
  • Gregory A. Bowman, Superintendent, Burbank
    Unified
  • Gay Zakrevsky, Superintendent, Fort Sage Unified
  • Edward Agundez, Superintendent, Greenfield Union
    School District
  • Mary Ellen Johnson, Superintendent, Loma Prieta
    JUECD
  • Dennis K. Wiliams, Superintendent, Tahoe-Truckee
    Unified
  • Carol M. Whitmer, Superintendent, Shasta County
    Office of Education
  • Edward M. Brand, Superintendent, Sweetwater Union
    High School District
  • David Gonzalez, Superintendent, Buena Vista
    School District
  • Johanna Vandermolen, Superintendent, Campbell
    Union School District
  • Barbara B. Wilson, Superintendent, Jefferson
    Elementary School District
  • Curt Dubost, Superintendent, Taft Union High
    School District
  • Kenny Richards, Superintendent, Northern Humboldt
    Union High School District
  • Colleen B. Wilcox, Superintendent, Santa Clara
    County Office of Education
  • Patrick Berry, Superintendent, Pacific Grove
    Unified
  • Bart OBrien, Superintendent, Placer Union High
    School District
  • Daniel Fomtes, Superintendent, Santa Cruz Valley
    Unified School District
  • John Mehl, Superintendent, San Mateo County
    Office of Education
  • Peter G. Mehas, Superintendent, Fresno County
    Office of Education

6
NCLB Statement of Purpose
Closing the achievement gap between high- and
low-performing children, especially the
achievement gaps between minority and nonminority
students, and between disadvantaged children and
their more advantaged peers. 20 U.S.C. 6301
7
Do We Need It?
8
Where Are We Now?
9
AT 4th GRADE?
10
AT 8th GRADE?
Note In 8th grade, students take different
course-specific tests in math depending on what
course they enroll in. These results show
proficiency of all 8th graders, regardless of
what course they are taking.
11
In High School?
12
And Lets Be Clear. Its Not Our Demographics.
13
Poor White 4th Graders in California Read At A
Lower Level Than Poor White Students in Almost
Every State
California
14
White 8th graders in California Read at a Lower
Level than White 8th Graders in Almost Every
Other State
California
15
What About Achievement For Different Groups of
Students in Los Angeles Unified?
16
Black and Latino LAUSD 4th Graders Read Below
LAUSD White 2nd Graders
Source California Department of Education
White
Black
Latino
17
LAUSD Black and Latino 8th Graders Score At or
Below LAUSD White 4th Graders in Math
Source California Department of Education
White
Black
Latino
18
LAUSD Poor 8th Graders Perform the Sameas
Non-Poor LAUSD 4th Graders in Math
19
LAUSD Black and Latino 11th Graders ReadBelow
LAUSD White 8th Graders
White
Black
Latino
20
Estimated LAUSD High School Completion Rates for
Class of 2003
of 9th Graders in 1999-00 Graduating) in 2003
(est.)
Source Education Trust West Analysis of
California Department of Education using
Manhattan Institute Methodology.
21
Estimated LAUSD College-Ready Completion Rates
for Class of 2003
of 9th Graders in 1999-00 Graduating with
UC/CSU Eligibility (A-G) in 2003 (est.)
Source Education Trust West Analysis of
California Department of Education using
Manhattan Institute Methodology.
22
NCLB a tool to meet the twin challenges of
raising overall achievement and closing gaps
between groups.
23
How Does NCLB help advocates address these issues?
  • Consistent goals for all schools
  • Including Graduation Rates
  • Accountability Demand that Districts and States
    Take Responsibility for Struggling Schools
  • Focus on Teacher Quality
  • Public Reporting

24
By the early 90s, it was clear that the we
needed a renewed focus on equity and achievement
gaps.
  • Congress reauthorized Title I as IASA, and
    allowed school districts to focus on whole-school
    reforms instead of pull-out programs.

25
The basic deal in 1994
  • More flexibility, more accountability
  • Feds would no longer ask HOW the money was spent,
    but whether all students were learning

26
The 1994 reforms required
  • Consistent state standards in reading and math
  • Full participation, with reasonable
    adaptations/accommodations for disabled and LEP
    students
  • State-determined AYP formulas for schools and
    districts
  • Disaggregated data

27
What happened?
  • Many states failed to implement law
  • Assessments Not Developed
  • LEP students not included
  • Weak AYP with no focus on gap-closing
  • Disaggregated data unavailable in most states
  • Gaps grew

28
And we continued defining quality in education
in the same old ways.
29
But, did we need it in California?After all, we
are improving. Right?
30
Most Schools in California Improve Their API
Every Year
31
Most Schools in CA Make Their API Growth Targets
32
Latino-White Gaps Closing Only Slightly
2003 Gap 33 points
1992 Gap 37 points
33
Black-White Gaps Closing Only Slightly
1992 Gap 36 points
2003 Gap 31 points
34
Improvement, Yes But Gaps Not Closing
Schools With Greater than 50 Latino Students
Still in Bottom Two API Deciles
Source Unpublished analysis by WestEd and the
Education Trust West, 2004.
35
Improvement, Yes. But Gaps Not Closing.
Schools With Greater than 50 African American
Students Still in Bottom Two API Deciles
Source Unpublished analysis by WestEd and the
Education Trust West, 2004.
36
Farallone View ElementaryCabrillo Unified, CA
  • 62 White
  • 23 Latino
  • 22 Low Income
  • A successful school under the CA accountability
    model (API). All students are improving indeed.

Source California Department of Education
37
Improving, yes. But enough? Fast enough?
  • Farallone View Elementary A successful school
    under CA accountability model (API)
  • Latino students met growth target
  • Low Income students met target
  • White students met target . . .

Source California Department of Education
38
Achievement Gaps at Farallone2002-03 A
Successful School????
All groups met their targets. Everyone rewarded.
All the while, the Latino-White Gap Grew from
238 to 250 points!!
Source California Department of Education
39
NCLB changed what it means to be
considered a good schoolNow, to be good, a
school, has to be good for every group of
students that it serves.
40
Public Supports that Definition of Good School
How concerned would you be about (the schools in
your area/your childs school) under the
following circumstances?
Most of the students in the school are
meting state standards but African American and
Hispanic students are not.
SOURCE Business Roundtable Survey conducted by
SDS (June 2003).
41
Public Supports that Definition of Good School
Is it OK or Not OK to consider a school to be
making adequate progress if only special
education students are not meeting state
standards?
Not OK
SOURCE Business Roundtable Survey conducted by
SDS (June 2003).
42
Public Supports that Definition of Good School
Is it OK or Not OK to consider a school to be
making adequate progress if only limited English
proficient students are not meeting state
standards?
Not OK
SOURCE Business Roundtable Survey conducted by
SDS (June 2003).
43
Large majorities of Latinos, African Americans,
and Whites agree with key provisions of NCLB
44
67 of Latinos, 69 of African Americans and 73
of Whites agree that the federal government
should require states to set strict performance
standards for schools.
SOURCE National Survey of Latinos Education,
Pew Hispanic Center/Kaiser Family Foundation,
January 2004.
45
Given the magnitude of change required from
educators, its not surprising that theres been
some push-back
  • Many are asking,
  • Can we do this?

46
The answer can be found in the many high-poverty,
high-minority schools that are far exceeding the
goals
  • Low-income and minority students have proven that
    they can learn to high levels, when they get the
    opportunity and support they need.
  • Look at these schools . . .

47
A Tale of Two Schools in Los Angeles
Source California Department of Education
http//www.cde.ca.gov
48
A Tale of Two Schools in Los Angeles
Source California Department of Education
http//www.cde.ca.gov
49
A Tale of Two Schools in Los Angeles
Source California Department of Education
http//www.cde.ca.gov
50
A Tale of Two Schools in Los Angeles
Source California Department of Education
http//www.cde.ca.gov
51
3rd Graders at 61st St. School Do Math at About
the Same Level as 5th Graders at 75th St. School
Source CDE DataQuest
52
Garden Grove Unified School District
Making Gains, Narrowing Gaps
Source Research by the National Center on
Educational Accountability
53
Fontana Unified School System
Making Gains Across Grades
Source California Department of Education
54
Gaps Narrow in Some Whole Districts Long Beach
Unified
Source Research by the National Center for
Educational Accountability
55
There is a 28 point gap between Poor African
American 8th graders in Los Angeles and Houston
(roughly equivalent to 3 years worth of learning)
SOURCE U.S. Department of Education, Institute
of Education Sciences, National Center for
Education Statistics, National Assessment of
Educational Progress (NAEP), 2003 Trial Urban
District Reading Assessment.
56
And these arent just freaks, flukes or outlier
schools.
  • Some whole states are proving that
  • DEMOGRAPHY IS NOT DESTINY

57
Source Education Trust analysis of data from
National School-Level State Assessment Score
Database (www.schooldata.org).
58
Source Education Trust analysis of data from
National School-Level State Assessment Score
Database (www.schooldata.org).
59
Source Education Trust analysis of data from
National School-Level State Assessment Score
Database (www.schooldata.org).
60
MA Passing HS Competency Exam
Source Massachusetts Department of Education
Web site.
61
MA Narrowing the High School Competency Gap
Source Massachusetts Department of Education
Web site.
62
MA Narrowing the High School Competency Gap
Source Massachusetts Department of Education
Web site.
63
MA Narrowing the High School Competency Gap
Source Massachusetts Department of Education
Web site.
64
DOES NCLBs SPOTLIGHT HELP?ABSOLUTELY!Many
states are feeling pressure to provide more
resources to high poverty schoolsandto expand
technical assistance to low-performing schools
65
Thats why more than 100 African American
and Latino superintendents, the Council of Great
City Schools and other education leaders have
spoken up in support of the accountability
provisions.
66
And why, in a recent survey done by the Center on
Education Policy, the overwhelming majority of
Chief State Schools Officers said that, on
balance, the accountability provisions of the law
would help to raise student achievement.
67
33 of 47 Chief State School Officers believe that
NCLB will improve student learning
To what extent do you believe that, over time,
the NCLB
accountability requirements will result in
increased student achievement?
SOURCE Center on Education Policy, January 2004
68
Despite their concerns, superintendents and
principals admit that NCLB has brought about
positive change in their schools.
  • 83 of superintendents and 75 of principals
    report they are more focused on curriculum,
    teaching, mentoring and professional development
    than ever before.

SOURCE Rolling Up Their Sleeves, Public Agenda
Survey in Alliance for Excellent Education
Newsletter, January, 2004.
69
If Congress backs off nowjust as these things
are just beginning to happen-- it will undermine
the efforts of these education leaders.
70
And it will undermine the efforts of counterparts
in state legislatures to get extra support for
schools serving concentrations of poor children.
71
Confronting the inequities in public education
is making some state policymakers very
uncomfortable
  • Why? Even though there are no penalties in the
    law for NOT getting all kids to proficient, the
    prospect of not doing so is causing many state
    legislatures to do what many have long advocated
    provide equitable funding for low-income
    schools.

72
Unequal Funding
  • Nationwide, high-poverty school districts get
    hundreds of dollars less per student than
    low-poverty school districts. Minority students
    are in the same boat.

73
Some States are Worse Than Others
  • Funding gap between high- and low-poverty
    districts per student
  • New York 1,672
  • Illinois 1,950
  • Pennsylvania 1,063
  • Maryland 1,027
  • Virginia 947
  • The Funding Gap 2003, available at
    www.edtrust.org.

74
In California?
  • Funding gap between high- and low-poverty
    districts per student 54
  • Funding gap between high- and low-minority
    districts per student 259
  • Seems low. . . But for a school like South Gate
    Middle, its over 1 million in unrealized funds
    per year.

75
  • We're very afraidWe're convinced that the
    long-term implications of No Child Left Behind
    are to call into question the adequacy of
    education funding in every state in the country
  • - NCSL Education Director David Shreve
  • Education Week, 10/01/03

76
Myth States or schools that dont make AYP will
be penalized by losing federal funding.
  • Reality There are no financial penalties in
    NCLB for states or schools that fail to make AYP.

77
Myth NCLB does not reward improvement, unlike
our API
  • Reality The Safe Harbor Provision captures
    schools that dont meet AYP targets, but still
    improve.
  • Even if SCHOOL does not meet Reading target for a
    certain group of students
  • If the school reduces the of students not
    meeting proficiency by 10
  • Then the school still meets AYP for that year

78
NCLB focusing on gap closing while rewarding
improvement.
  • Jefferson Elementary School
  • API for White Students 925
  • API for Asian Students 858
  • API for Low-Income Students - 724
  • API for African American Students 615

79
(No Transcript)
80
(No Transcript)
81
(No Transcript)
82
Myth The new ESEA expects more from schools,
but doesnt provide any additional resources to
help meet these expectations.
  • Reality Title I funding should be increased to
    the maximum authorized under law, but funding
    for Title I has increased by 40 -- from 8.8
    billion in 2001 to 12.4 billion in 2004.
  • California will receive 3.1 billion in NCLB
    money in FY 2004

83
Myth NCLB Does Not Grant Adequate Flexibility in
Responding to AYP Results
  • Reality The only non-negotiables are choice and
    supplemental services for low-income students.
  • Local officials retain tremendous discretion to
    implement aggressive or mild interventions,
    depending on facts and professional judgment.

84
Myth AYP unfairly punishes high-poverty/high-min
ority schools because those students do worse on
achievement tests.
  • Reality High-poverty and high-minority schools
    all over the country are showing thats not the
    case. Real punishment for students, not adults
    would be continuing to conceal, and do nothing
    to change, schools that persistently fail to
    educate low-income and minority students.

85
Why We Need NCLB Closing the Teacher Quality Gap
86
Closing the Teacher Quality Gap
  • To date, most public discussions of NCLB have
    focused on the Acts aggressive goals for student
    achievement and the new accountability system
    designed to make sure that schools make progress
    for all students towards those goals. But, it
    may well be that the provisions in the law
    relating to teacher quality and its distribution
    across different kinds of schools end up driving
    even more change than the accountability system.

87
78 of Latinos, 79 of African Americans and 75
of Whites say that a schools top priority should
be ensuring that all teachers are highly
qualified in their subjects,
  • even if that means class sizes will be larger.

SOURCE National Survey of Latinos Education,
Pew Hispanic Center/Kaiser Family Foundation,
January 2004.
88
Students in the Highest Poverty LAUSD Schools Are
Almost Three Times As Likely To Have An
Underqualified Teacher
Source Education Trust West Analysis of
California Department of Education data
89
Closing the Teacher Quality Gap What Does NCLB
Require?
  • States and districts must develop a plan to
    ensure that all teachers teaching in core
    academic subjects within the State are highly
    qualified not later than the end of the 2005-2006
    school year.
  • States and districts must ensure that poor and
    minority children are not taught at higher rates
    than other children by inexperienced,
    unqualified, or out-of-field teachers.
  • States must report the percentage of classes in
    the State not taught by highly qualified
    teachers, disaggregated by high-poverty
    compared to low-poverty schools
  • Schools must notify parents if the parent's
    child has been taught for four or more
    consecutive weeks by a teacher who is not
    highly qualified.

90
We have a long way to go, but California has
started down the right path
  • Just last summer, a new definition of a highly
    qualified teacher that complies with the
    requirements of NCLB, including
  • All new teachers at the elementary school level
    will need to pass a rigorous subject matter test
  • Those entering the profession at the middle and
    high school level will need either a major or
    pass a test in each subject they teach
  • Those not new to the profession will be able to
    satisfy NCLBs requirements for demonstrating
    subject matter competence through an alternative
    evaluation process contained in NCLB the high
    objective uniform state standard of evaluation
    or HOUSSE.

91
The Rivkin, Hanushek, and Kain estimates of
teacher performance suggest that having five
years of good teachers in a row could overcome
the average seventh-grade mathematics
achievement gap .
1.0 standard deviation above average, or at
the 85th quality percentile
SOURCE Eric A. Hanushek and Steven G. Rivkin,
How to Improve the Supply of High-Quality
Teachers, In Brookings Papers on Education
Policy 2004, Diane Ravitch, ed., Brrookings
Institution Press, 2004. Estimates based on
research using data from Texas described in
Teachers, Schools, and Academic Achievement,
Working Paper Number 6691, National Bureau of
Economic Research, revised July 2002.
92
Why We Need NCLB Changing the Conversation
93
Some leaders are talking about the challenges of
NCLB in one way, a way that is unlikely to get us
very far
94
  • "I have difficulty with the standards because
    they're so unattainable for so many of our
    students . . . We just don't have the same kids
    they have on Long Island or Orchard Park.
  • Superintendent, New York October 21, 2002, The
    Buffalo News

95
They may as well have decreed that pigs can fly
. . . I think the State Board of Education is
dealing with reality, not myth. Some of these
politicians just have their heads in the
sand. -Wayne Johnson, CTA President Los Angeles
Times August 6, 2002
96
"There is an understanding nationally that you
can't compare apples with oranges. You can't
compare a school with kids from Scarsdale with
kids starting from Bushwick. It's really that
simple." Jill Chaifetz, executive director of
Advocates for Children, The New York Times,
2/14/03
97
"If a school has five subgroups (of students) and
four do well, but one fails, the entire school is
a failure. We don't think that's fair. Reg
Weaver, President of the NEA, Whittier Daily
News, 5/24/03
98
Think about the messages in what they say
  • To parentsabout whose kids matter
  • To studentsabout how much educators think they
    can learn and,
  • To teachersabout whether they even have to try.

99
Other leaders are talking about the challenge in
very different ways.
100
I think it's a completely reasonable expectation
that all students will have a basic proficiency
in the subjects we teach, and we are working
toward that goal already.  Will it be
difficult? Of course. Is it doable? I certainly
believe it is. We believe in turning our schools
around and we're working to stay on that path. If
we didn't, then we would be shortchanging our
kids.
Changing the Conversation
-- Joe Farley , Oceanside Unified School District
Deputy Superintendent, North County Times (CA),
1/9/03
101
Changing the Conversation
Our responsibility is to be sure no student
falls out of the system because we didn't support
them, regardless of their backgrounds.
Bill Brand, outgoing superintendent of the Santa
Paula Union High School District, Los Angeles
Times, 1/27/03
102
Changing the Conversation
  • We haven't been worried about stigma. To us,
    the most significant ramification that we can
    imagine is that we don't get rid of this gap.

 -- Oak Park River Forest H.S. (IL) Principal
and District Superintendent Susan Bridge,
Chicago Sun-Times, 10/16/03
103
Changing the Conversation
  • "If you love children, you can't say this law is
    a waste. . . It has to come down to someone
    making sure these kids are getting an education.
  • Denise Allen, Kentucky
  • November 13, 2002, Lexington Herald Leader

104
Changing the Conversation
"At the end of the day, we are responsible for
every child. Will we do it? Certainly. Will we
look good early on? I doubt it." Superintendent
, Wake CountyJune 2, 2002 News and Observer (NC)
105
Changing the Conversation
Yes, parents may have the greatest impact on how
their children come to us. But we have the
greatest impact on how they leave
us. Superintendent, North Carolina
106
Yes, this is going to be hard. But how we
communicate will play a large role in whether
people will even try.
107
NCLB Can Make a DifferenceIF Schools, districts
and the state, narrow their focus, raise their
sights, and ACT on the power of the NCLB.
108
The Education Trust-West
510-465-6444 www.EdTrustWest.org
About PowerShow.com