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Professional Activity Day Nonfiction Writing January 30, 2009

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Title: Professional Activity Day Nonfiction Writing January 30, 2009


1
Professional Activity Day Nonfiction
Writing January 30, 2009
2
(No Transcript)
3
Agenda
  • 915 a.m. Welcome/Prayer
  • 930 a.m. - 1030 a.m. Non-fiction writing
  • 1030 a.m. - 1045 a.m. Break
  • 1045 a.m. - 1145 a.m. Ontario Writing
    Assessment (OWA) Part 1
  • 1145 a.m. - 115 p.m. Lunch
  • 115 p.m. - 200 p.m. OWA Part 2- Teacher
    moderation
  • 200 p.m. - 300 p.m. School Effectiveness-
    Break out session.
  • 300 p.m. Dismissal

4
  • The more writing that students do and the more
    success they have in their writing, the more they
    will want to write and the better writers they
    will become.
  • A Guide to Effective Literacy Instruction, Gr.
    4-6 Volume 6 -Page 8

5
The Power of Nonfiction Writing
  • Douglas Reeves video

6
Top 5 Forms of Nonfiction Writing
  • Recounts
  • Explanatory
  • Persuasive
  • Procedural / Instructional
  • (how-to)
  • 5. Descriptive

7
Formats (HOW we teach the forms)
  • letters, journals, lists, paragraphs, newspaper
    articles, speeches, magazines, interviews, blogs,
    essays, advertisements, instructions, e-mails,
    announcements, etc.

8
Quick/Free Write Activity
  • On your place mat do a quick write for 2
    minutes about nonfiction recounts.
  • What do you know about them?
  • What is the purpose?
  • How would you teach it?
  • Where would it fit into your programming?
  • How would you explain it to parents?

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NONFICTION RECOUNT
  • PURPOSE
  • To retell about specific events and/or the lives
    of specific people

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NONFICTION RECOUNT FORMATS
  • Biographies of inventors, pioneers, authors,
    sports heroes, your mother
  • Retelling of past events First Thanksgiving,
    the birth of Jesus, Olympic opening ceremonies,
    disasters (Hurricane Katrina, Titanic), origin of
    customs (Chinese New Year)

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RECOUNT CHARACTERISTICS
  • Important events and a setting
  • who, what, where, when
  • Events in sequential order
  • Personal comment or reflection about the events
  • Language features simple past tense, action
    verbs, time linking words first, then, after
    that, finally
  • Could involve research

13
Sidney Crosby by Carl in Kindergarten
  • Sidney Crosby was a hockey player.
  • He was famous. Who?
  • He was good at scoring goals. He
  • played lots of games. What?
  • I wish I could play like him.
  • Closing statement

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Recount Activity
  • Turn to a partner and orally recount a Sidney
    Crosby moment/experience!

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NONFICTION RECOUNTS
  • FORMATS
  • reports
  • biographies
  • autobiographies
  • letters
  • poetry
  • journals
  • scripts
  • articles
  • KEY TRAITS IN
  • NONFICTION
  • RECOUNTS
  • ideas
  • organization

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Quick Write Activity
  • On your place mat do a quick write for 2
    minutes about explanatory writing.
  • What do you know about explanatory writing?
  • What is the purpose?
  • How would you teach it?
  • Where would it fit into your programming?
  • How would you explain it to parents?

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Share
  • Turn and talk to an elbow partner at your table.
  • Compare your responses with your colleagues and
    highlight new ideas!
  • Continue to add to your place mat as the day
    proceeds.

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EXPLANATORY WRITING
  • PURPOSE
  • Informs and/or explains
  • Tells HOW and WHY things are the way they are

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CHARACTERISTICS OF EXPLANATORY WRITING
  • Begins with an opening statement, logical
    sequence (e.g. cause and effect,
    problem-solution) and closing statement
  • Uses precise, subject-specific language (e.g.
    scientific vocabulary)
  • Uses an impersonal, objective tone
  • Usually includes a definition, classification,
    description, or summary of the topic

25
Cross-curricular Links
  • Why did the chicken cross the road?
  • Why do cats have whiskers?
  • How I got my name!
  • Why does snow melt?
  • Why do some objects float or sink?
  • How does healthy living affect teens in a
    positive way?
  • Explain the issues that led to the War of 1812.

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2 Minute Activity
  • Choose one of the images below and explain it to
    an elbow partner.

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EXPLANATORY WRITING
  • FORMATS
  • reports
  • articles
  • letters
  • journals
  • definition
  • captions
  • labels
  • note
  • speech
  • illustrations
  • essay
  • question and answer
  • interviews
  • TRAITS EMPHASIZED IN
  • EXPLANATORY
  • WRITING
  • Ideas
  • Organization

29
Quick Write Activity
  • On your place mat do a quick write for 2 minutes
    about persuasive writing.
  • What do you know about persuasive writing?
  • What is the purpose?
  • How would you teach it?
  • Where would it fit into your programming?
  • How would you explain it to parents?

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Share
  • Turn and talk to an elbow partner at your table.
  • Compare your responses with your colleagues and
    highlight new ideas!
  • Continue to add to your place mat as the day
    proceeds.

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PERSUASIVE WRITING
  • PURPOSE
  • To state your point of view or to convince others
    of your opinion or thoughts
  • To argue a case

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CHARACTERISTICS OF PERSUASIVE WRITING
  • Begins with an overview statement about authors
    position
  • Written in present tense
  • Factual, logical supporting details/arguments
  • Persuasive words or phrase
  • A good reason why
  • May include comparison-contrast and/or
    information from research e.g., tables,
    illustrations, labels
  • Conclusion Call to action

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PERSUASIVE WRITING
  • FORMATS
  • Letters
  • Speeches
  • Advertisements
  • Posters
  • Debates
  • Editorials/Articles
  • Brochures
  • Pamphlets
  • Award nominations
  • Websites
  • Blogs
  • KEY TRAITS IN
  • PERSUASIVE
  • WRITING
  • Voice
  • Word choice
  • Sentence fluency

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Sample Activities for Persuasive Writing
  • What is the better pet cats or dogs?
    (compare). Defend your choice!
  • Make a case for using rural or marginal land-use
    areas for wind turbine farms?
  • Why should you conserve electricity?
  • Nominate a classmate for student council
    president.

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Possible Persuasive Writing Activities
  • Letter to principal outlining your opinion about
    end of day recess, to the editor stating your
    opinion whether the Santa Claus parade should be
    held in the day or night
  • The best Canadian rock band, hockey team in the
    NHL, TV program
  • Prepare for a debate about whether daylight
    savings time should or should not be changed
  • Speech to School Board about whether or not
    bottled water should be sold in schools

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Procedural Writing Activity
  • Create a 3 step mime or tableau procedure and
    have your partner write down the steps.

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PROCEDURAL OR INSTRUCTIONAL WRITING
  • PURPOSE
  • To tell how to achieve a particular goal or how
    to follow a set of instructions

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CHARACTERISTICS OF PROCEDURAL WRITING
  • Title, goal, purpose or aim
  • Materials, ingredients or equipment needed
  • Procedure or steps to be followed
  • May be numbered
  • Illustrations, diagrams, labels may be used
  • May include an evaluative concluding statement
    (e.g. Taste the cookies. If they are not sweet
    enough, add more sugar next time.)

42
PROCEDURAL OR INSTRUCTIONAL WRITING
  • How to make fruit salad
  • How to brush your teeth, wash your hands, etc.
  • How to construct a periscope
  • How to fix a flat tire
  • How to create a website
  • How to construct an isosceles triangle
  • How to get to the library from my school
  • Safety steps for using microscopes

43
Procedural Writing
  • FORMATS
  • recipes
  • rules
  • directions
  • experiments
  • lists
  • maps
  • games
  • letters
  • E-mail
  • Illustrations
  • captions
  • labels
  • KEY TRAITS IN
  • PROCEDURAL WRITING
  • organization
  • word choice

44
Quick Write Activity
  • On your place mat do a quick write for 2 minutes
    to summarize your learning about procedural
    writing.
  • What is the purpose?
  • How would you teach it?
  • Where would it fit into your programming?
  • How would you explain it to parents?

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Descriptive Writing
  • Examine the following painting by Paul Gauguin,
    La Orana Maria (Hail Mary) 1891.
  • On your place mat quick write as many
    interesting, vivid, salsa, thick words to
    describe what you see.

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La Orana Maria
49
La Orana Maria
  • Turn to your partner and share
  • your descriptive words and how
  • you might follow this activity up
  • with a writing activity in your
  • classroom.

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DESCRIPTIVE WRITING
  • PURPOSE
  • Vividly portray a person, place or thing in such
    a way that the reader can visualize the topic and
    enter into the writers experience
  • Give details often physical about animals,
    plants, weather, medicine, machines and countries

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Characteristics of Descriptive Writing
  • Title identifies what is being described
  • Starts with an opening statement
  • Facts are grouped into paragraphs and/or
    subheadings
  • Showing rather than telling through the use
    of active verbs and precise modifiers

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Characteristics of Descriptive Writing Continued…
  • summary statement
  • Includes a symbolism, personification
  • Sensory language paints pictures for the reader
    based on the five senses
  • Rich, vivid and lively detail
  • Figurative language such as simile, hyperbole,
    metaphor

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DESCRIPTIVE WRITING
  • FORMATS
  • reports
  • definitions
  • paragraphs
  • labels
  • captions
  • illustrations
  • questions and answers
  • KEY TRAITS IN
  • DESCRIPTIVE
  • WRITING
  • organization
  • word choice

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DESCRIPTIVE WRITING
  • Our School
  • Our school is big.
  • It is red and it has stairs. There are lots of
    kids in the school.
  • There are lots of teachers.
  • Kids have fun and learn a lot. They learn to
    read. I love our school.

56
  • The writing you get out of your students can only
    be as good
  • as the classroom literature that surrounds and
    sustains it.
  • Fletcher and Portalupi
  • Craft Lessons Teaching Writing K-8

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The Kindergarten Program (2006)
  • Communicate in writing, using strategies that are
    appropriate for beginners
  • Demonstrate a beginning understanding and
    critical awareness of media texts

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The Kindergarten Program (2006)
  • experiment with a variety of simple writing
    forms for different purposes and in a variety of
    contexts
  • communicate ideas about personal experiences
    and/or familiar stories, and experiment with
    personal voice in their writing

59
Language Curriculum 1-8 (2006)
  • OVERALL WRITING EXPECTATION 1
  • Generate, gather, and organize ideas and
    information to write for an intended purpose and
    audience

60
Language Curriculum 1-8 (2006)
  • OVERALL WRITING EXPECTATION 2
  • Draft and revise their writing, using a
  • variety of information , literary, and
  • graphic forms and stylistic elements
  • (traits) appropriate for the purpose and
  • audience

61
Language Curriculum 1-8 (1998 and 2006)
  • Specific expectations
  • identify topic, purpose, audience and form for
    writing the writing process (1.1)
  • Identifies traits develop ideas, classify and
    organize ideas, voice, word choice (spelling/
    vocabulary), sentence fluency, point of view,
    revision, punctuation, grammar
  • OWA can assist educators to teach and assess a
  • greater variety of text forms.

62
GRADUAL RELEASE OF RESPONSIBILITY
  • Modelled Writing
  • Shared Writing
  • Interactive Writing (share the pen)
  • Guided Writing
  • Independent Writing
  • How do these link to read-alouds,
  • shared/guided/independent
  • reading? MENTOR TEXTS

63
  • What students have been missing for years is
    seeing their teacher write.
  • They need to see you wrestle with a piece you
    care about delete and rethink and add details.
  • They want to hear your wish for a funny piece you
    are working on and then celebrate with you when
    you finally write a draft that shows what you
    mean.
  • Donald Graves

64
Modelled Writing
  • High teacher support use mentor texts
  • Explicitly teach using focused
    demonstration
  • Teacher models problem-solving
  • skills and strategies during writing
  • Involves the teacher scripting the
  • text while thinking aloud create
  • anchor charts

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Modelled Writing
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Modelled Writing
  • All students must SEE text as you WRITE
  • Teacher explicitly teaches strategies/genres/forma
    ts and demonstrates the writing process while
    collaborating with students
  • Teacher explains, thinks aloud and WRITES aloud

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Shared Writing
  • Teachers works WITH the students to construct a
    piece of writing
  • Teacher controls the PEN
  • Students actively contribute their IDEAS
  • Enables teacher to support and scaffold writers
  • Lesson explicitly teaches a writing
  • text form, strategy, etc.

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Shared Writing Continued..
  • Continue to think aloud while writing
  • Teacher responds to student suggestions, showing
    how they contribute to the writing
  • POWERFUL teaching tool in all curriculum areas
  • Provides anchor charts for classroom so that
    students can refer back to them

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Interactive Writing
  • Teacher shares the pen
  • Very engaging for students
  • Mix of teacher print and student
  • print on charts, overheads,
  • SMART boards, etc.

70
Guided Writing
  • Teacher identifies a gap in students writing
    performance and decides on instructional focus
  • Guides students to apply techniques to their own
    writing as they move to independent practice
  • Guides, supports, and gives feedback to students
    in the group

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Independent Writing
  • students do the writing themselves, drawing on
    the knowledge/skills learned in modelled, shared
    and guided lessons plus teacher feedback
  • frequently on topics of students choice
  • explains, responds to needs, coaches, re-teaches,
    encourages, observes to plan future teaching

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What is the Ontario Writing Assessment (OWA)?
  • an assessment tool that provides on-demand
    writing tasks specific to each grade level from
    SK-Grade 8 samples of levelled student work
    (EXEMPLARS or ANCHORS) with rationals
  • 3 writing tasks per grade at beginning, middle
    and end of the school year a variety of text
    formats over the course of SK-Grade 8
  • exemplars are based on student work at the END of
    the school year for each grade

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Ontario Writing Assessment
  • Reflects the revised Kindergarten and Language
    curriculum Gr. 1-8 (2006) Achievement Chart
  • provides a common assessment tool for teachers,
    schools, and districts
  • features anchors with rationales that align to
    the 4 levels of the Achievement Chart
  • provides next steps based on the needs of the
    students

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Four Categories of the Achievement Chart
  • Knowledge and Understanding
  • Thinking
  • Communication
  • Application

75
Four Categories of the Achievement Chart
  • Knowledge and Understanding
  • ORGANIZATION
  • Thinking IDEAS AND CONTENT

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Four Categories of the Achievement Chart
  • Communication
  • VOICE, WORD CHOICE,
  • CONVENTIONS,
  • SENTENCE FLUENCY
  • Application IDEAS AND CONTENT (connection to
    topic, personal experience and life situations to
    enhance main idea)

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WRITING PROCESS
  • Prewriting Ideas
  • Drafting Ideas, Org
  • Revising I, Org, V, WC, SF
  • Editing Conventions, SF
  • Publishing Presentation

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Task
  • Number yourselves around the table from number
    1-6.
  • Educator 1
  • Read aloud one sample of student work to the
    people at your table.
  • Pass a copy of this sample at your table.
  • In pairs, look at the Knowledge and Understanding
    category in your OWA grade resource or use the
    photocopies
  • provided at your table.

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Task Continued…
  • Read the criteria for Knowledge and
  • Understanding part of the rubric AND the sample
    Level 1, 2, 3 and 4 assessment with rationales.
  • Discuss how the first sample of student work
    should be assessed.
  • Teacher talk
  • I think this work is a Level 3 in K and U
    because…
  • When I look at this rubric and this piece of
    work, I think that…
  • Im not sure if this is Level 2 or 3 work. What
    do you think?

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Task Continued..
  • You have a choice
  • Follow through with this piece of work and
    continue to the other 3 categories. OR
  • Choose another sample of student work and
    practice assessing in the category of Knowledge
    and Understanding.

81
Task Continued…
  • Lets move on to Thinking!

82
  • Lets move on Communication!

83
  • Lets move onto Application!

84
Thank You
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