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Title: WorkshopWebcast


1
Workshop/Webcast 2 Municipal Hazardous or
Special Waste Program Plan Development Process
Slide 1
  • February 12, 2007

2
Todays Agenda (1)
Slide 2
  • Consultation Process
  • Definition of Obligated Materials
  • Designated Stewards
  • Baseline Municipal Infrastructure
  • Profile of Phase 1 Materials Baseline
    Information
  • Questions Answers
  • Break

3
Todays Agenda (2)
Slide 3
  • Program Management Options
  • Key Program Elements
  • Preparing to Meet Your Steward Obligations
  • Questions Answers
  • Summary
  • Adjourn

4
The Framework We Are Presenting Today (1)
Slide 4
  • Amount of each material
  • sold
  • available as residual for collection
  • collected
  • recycled
  • disposed
  • And then

5
The Framework We Are Presenting Today (2)
Slide 5
  • Options to
  • reduce amount of residual requiring management
  • And of that remaining
  • increase reuse
  • increase amounts recycled
  • reduce amounts disposed

6
Welcome
Slide 6
  • In person 70
  • Webcast audience 125
  • slides advance automatically
  • enlarge slide
  • email box for questions/comments on left-hand
    side of webcast console
  • use any time
  • please include name affiliation
  • Archived webcast available for 6 months

7
Responsibility for Development of MHSW Program
Plan
Slide 7
Program Committee CPCA (Chair) Canadian
Tire LCBO CCGD Ontario Agro Business CFI PG
CHHMA PPG CPPI RBRC CHBA ElectroFed RCC
Home Hardware Recochem Honeywell SC Johnson ICI
Paints Wal-Mart
Governance Committee CHHMA (Chair) Canadian
Consumer Specialty Products Association Canadian
Paints Coatings Association Canadian Tire Coca
Cola Bottling RBRC CHBA Recochem Retail Council
of Canada Unilever Canada
8
Consultation Process
Slide 8
  • Derek Stephenson

9
Where We Are in the Process
Slide 9
  • Workshop 2
  • Information is preliminary for purpose of
    consultation
  • Encouraging key stakeholders to engage in process

10
Next Steps (1)
Slide 10
  • Comments welcome
  • Written comments to comments_at_stewardshipontario.ca
    by 5 p.m., Thursday, February 22
  • Post draft preliminary program plan for
    consultation March 7
  • Workshop 3 March 22
  • Written comments by April 2
  • Post revised program plan April 6

11
Next Steps (2)
Slide 11
  • Waste Diversion Ontario (WDO) reviews draft
    preliminary plan April 19
  • WDO reviews draft final plan May 23
  • Stewardship Ontario Board makes final revisions
    by May 28
  • WDO submits to Minister by May 31

12
Definition of Obligated Materials
Slide 12
  • Derek Stephenson

13
Obligated Materials Products
Slide 13
  • Notification of expected designation announced by
    Minister April 20, 2006
  • Draft MHSW regulation posted June 9, 2006
  • 30 day comment period followed
  • Final regulation decision notice posted
    December 11, 2006
  • Program request letter specifies phased
    implementation

14
3 Phase Program
Slide 14
  • Program plan for Phase 1 materials due May 31
  • Phase 2 will be determined as per future program
    request letter
  • Additional phases possible

15
Product Definitions for Development of Program
Plan
Slide 15
  • Provides Stewardship Ontario legal authority to
    require stewards to submit reports levy fees,
    if necessary
  • Copies of product definitions (Handout 1) for
    consultation provided at workshop also on
    Stewardship Ontario WDO websites
  • Products included excluded from program will be
    detailed in program plan

16
How Product Definitions Developed
Slide 16
  • Stewardship Ontario MHSW Program Committee struck
    Working Group of affected stewards
  • Affected industry associations contributed to
    product definitionsreviewed with Ministry of
    Environment (MOE)
  • Definitions further revised by affected industry
    associationsreviewed with MOE
  • Working Group approved product definitions for
    purposes of consultation February 8

17
Key Highlights
Slide 17
  • Broad agreement on paints coatings oil
    filters oil containers antifreeze
  • Considerable discussion to reach compromise on
    fertilizers pesticides capture potential small
    quantity Industrial, Commercial Institutional
    (ICI) generators without including compost,
    manure, natural materials
  • Solvents most complex to define (function not
    product) program plan to provide greater
    clarity
  • Single cell batteries included as special wastes

18
2005 Municipal Data Quantities Managed
Slide 18
19
Designated Stewards
Slide 19
  • Gordon Day

20
Ministers Letter
Slide 20
  • 5. Funding Rules for Phase 1 of the phase-in
    schedule
  • a) Consistent with WDA principles, the proposed
    funding rules should designate and define as
    stewards under the program, brand owners and/or
    first importers into Ontario of products that
    result in the generation of MHSW under the
    program. Such products shall be referred to as
    Municipal Hazardous or Special Material.

Waste Diversion Act, 2002 Addendum to the
Ministers Request for a waste diversion program
for Municipal Hazardous or Special Waste
21
Current Stewardship Ontario Rules
Slide 21
  • Current Blue Box Rules designate
  • Brand Owner
  • First Importer
  • Voluntary Steward
  • Should we simply replace Blue Box with
    Municipal Hazardous or Special Material (MHSM)
    keep same Rule structure?

22
Voluntary Steward Current Rule
Slide 22
  • Any person who elects to become a steward
    respecting Designated Blue Box Waste that would
    otherwise be the responsibility of another
    steward, shall be designated a steward upon
    execution of a contract with Stewardship Ontario,
    notice of which appears on the Stewardship
    Ontario website, and the steward otherwise
    responsible is exempt from the requirement to pay
    fees respecting such Designated Blue Box Waste
    during the currency of the contract.
  • Should this be adopted for MHSW program?

23
Voluntary Steward Options for MHSM
Slide 23
  • Modify current approach
  • allows out of province brand owners to report on
    behalf of resident retailer(s)
  • New approach
  • allow retailers to report remit on behalf of
    brand owners
  • allow retailers to remit fees brand owners
    report

24
Summary
Slide 24
  • For the MHSW program, Rules required to
  • designate steward
  • provide provision for voluntary option
  • define MHSM
  • establish fee rates
  • establish commencement date data year
  • establish reporting requirements deadlines

25
Baseline Municipal Infrastructure
Slide 25
  • Joe Hall

26
Outline
Slide 26
  • Municipal infrastructure
  • MHSW program operations
  • MHSW plan development
  • municipal thoughts
  • Ontario MHSW infrastructure
  • what will it look like?

27
Products Begin as Municipal Hazardous or Special
Material (1)
Slide 27
28
Products Begin as Municipal Hazardous or Special
Material (2)
Slide 28
29
Quinte Waste Solutions
Slide 29
30
Region of Peel (1)
Slide 30
31
Region of Peel (2)
Slide 31
32
Halton Region (1)
Slide 32
33
Halton Region (2)
Slide 33
34
Peterborough
Slide 34
35
City of Ottawa (1)
Slide 35
36
City of Ottawa (2)
Slide 36
37
Ottawa Valley Waste Recovery Centre (1)
Slide 37
38
Ottawa Valley Waste Recovery Centre (2)
Slide 38
39
Ottawa Valley Waste Recovery Centre (3)
Slide 39
40
MHSW Plan Development (1)
Slide 40
  • Municipal thoughts
  • designation starts Extended Producer
    Responsibility (EPR) system
  • willing partners to develop comprehensive plan
    to serve Ontario
  • currently have infrastructure to help fulfill to
    be determined plan
  • municipal industry teams working to define
    collection, transportation processing

41
MHSW Plan Development (2)
Slide 41
  • Municipal thoughts, continued
  • need to establish accessibility standard
  • define role of industry take back programs
  • define municipal role
  • what to do in areas where no municipal programs
    or dollars to cover MHSW?

42
MHSW Plan Development (3)
Slide 42
  • Municipal thoughts, continued
  • small quantity ICI generator service impact on
    collection costs? on accessibility issue?
  • plan must avoid best practice analysis
    paralysis datacalls
  • when will plan be implemented?
  • when will industry step up to plate institute
    EPR?

43
Ontario MHSW Infrastructure
Slide 43
  • Will serve all Ontario residents adequately
  • Combination of industry take back programs
    continuation of municipal programs
  • Meets WDA requirements
  • Sustainable operations program that promote EPR
    with ENVIRONMENT as priority
  • Sets model for other plans to follow

44
Profile of Phase 1 Materials Baseline
Information
Slide 44
  • Gordon Day
  • Refer to Handout 2

45
Paint Coatings Profile
Slide 45
  • Latex, oil solvent based coatings including
    paints stains
  • Industry includes paint manufacturers retailers
  • involved in 4 existing programs in other
    provinces
  • Municipal collection primary collection activity
  • Material collected is leftover product no longer
    wanted by consumer

46
Paint Coatings Generation Collection
Slide 46
  • 116,000 tonnes paint sold based on 2005 industry
    data
  • Estimated 7 of paint sold available for
    collection
  • Estimated 47 of available paint collected
    through municipal systems
  • largest volume product collected in municipal
    MHSW programs
  • Can reprocess resell most leftover latex paint
  • researching latex as additive to concrete
  • Can reprocess oil based paint

47
Paint Coatings Trends Issues
Slide 47
  • Sales trends continue towards latex based paints
  • Sufficient processing capacity in Ontario
    Québec
  • Empty steel paint containers accepted in most
    Ontario Blue Box programs

48
Solvents Profile
Slide 48
  • Fairly broad definition encompasses wide range of
    product stewards
  • paint coatings
  • cleaning maintenance
  • hardware
  • automotive

49
Solvents Generation Collection
Slide 49
  • 2,500 tonnes hydrocarbon halogenated-hydrocarbon
    based products
  • Generation information for other solvents not yet
    available
  • 1,400 tonnes flammables recovered through
    municipal programs
  • only a portion covered as solvent
  • Some collected solvents can be recycled into new
    product

50
Solvents Trends Issues
Slide 50
  • Trend toward latex reduces need for some paint
    related solvents
  • Program plan will need to explore how solvents
    can be recovered
  • what percentage can be recycled versus other
    options?

51
Oil Filter Profile
Slide 51
  • Spin on style for engine, hydraulic
    transmission
  • 85 are
  • Comprising metal, paper filter used oil
  • Filters available for collection at auto service
    centres Do It Yourself (DIY)
  • Industry involved in 5 existing programs in other
    provinces

52
Oil Filter Generation Collection
Slide 52
  • 21M units sold
  • Estimated 14,000 tonnes of used filters available
    for collection
  • contain oil, sediment
  • Steel recycled, oil recovered
  • Estimated at 38 provincial recovery in 2004
    Ontario Used Oil Management Association (OUOMA)
    plan
  • recovery likely higher now

53
Oil Filters Trends Issues
Slide 53
  • Automotive service centres represent largest
    point source access to filters
  • Filter handling at municipal sites are from DIY
    market
  • declining DIY
  • Stable recycling infrastructure in Ontario

54
Used Oil Containers Profile
Slide 54
  • Containers for lubricating oil products
  • Typically HDPE containers range from 500 ml to 4
    litres
  • Brand owners include oil companies major
    retailers
  • Involved in 5 existing programs in other
    provinces
  • build on successes in other provinces

55
Used Oil Containers Generation Collection
Slide 55
  • 4,400 tonnes of used containers generated, based
    on 2005 industry data
  • Majority generated at automotive service
    locations
  • smaller quantities generated at municipal depots
  • Estimated at 3 provincial recovery in 2004 OUOMA
    plan
  • collected at some service centres part of fluid
    management programs
  • not typically collected for recycling at
    municipal depots

56
Used Oil Containers Trends Issues
Slide 56
  • Automotive service centres represent largest
    point source access to containers
  • Containers are byproduct of handling at municipal
    sites through DIY
  • Container generation declining
  • Unknown processing capacity to recycle used
    containers (Ontario)
  • processors need special equipment

57
Dry Cell Batteries Profile
Slide 57
  • Easily removable primary batteries including
    following chemistry
  • alkaline-manganese
  • zinc-carbon
  • lithium batteries
  • button cells
  • Alkaline batteries majority of total
  • A, AA, AAA, C, D, 9-V
  • Does not include secondary (rechargeable)
    batteries
  • to be addressed in Phase 2

58
Dry Cell Batteries Generation Collection
Slide 58
  • Estimated 3,600 tonnes sold in Ontario
  • 204 tonnes collected at municipal sites
  • Estimated 6 provincial recovery

59
Dry Cell Batteries Trends Issues
Slide 59
  • Growth in primary battery use more electronic
    products
  • Growth in rechargeable alternatives
  • Need for research on processing capacity for
    Ontario
  • 1 Ontario recycler

60
Antifreeze Profile
Slide 60
  • Ethylene or propylene glycol used as vehicle
    engine coolant
  • Sold in bulk to automotive service centres
  • Containers sold through retail for DIY/top-up
    market
  • Largest volumes concentrated at automotive
    service centres

61
Antifreeze Generation Collection
Slide 61
  • 42,000 tonnes of antifreeze sold
  • 27,000 tonnes through bulk distribution
  • 15,000 tonnes in packaged format
  • Most auto service locations recover antifreeze
  • Municipalities collected 244 tonnes
  • Provincial recovery not known assumed to be
    fairly high
  • Processors recover glycol from used antifreeze

62
Antifreeze Trends Issues
Slide 62
  • More volume available for recovery than sold
  • 50 of market is concentrate
  • High percentage of recovery through auto service
    centres
  • Containers are byproduct of handling at municipal
    sites through DIY

63
Pressurized Containers Profile
Slide 63
  • Includes refillable commercial cylinders
  • industrial gases
  • medical, laboratory
  • Refillable domestic uses
  • breathing air supply
  • propane barbeque
  • Single use non-refillable cylinders
  • 1 pound camping, propane torches

64
Pressurized Containers Generation Collection
Slide 64
  • Refillable commercial cylinders certified
    exchanged - recertified or recycled
  • Refillable domestic cylinders certified for 10
    years - recertified or recycled
  • 540 tonnes returned through municipal programs
  • 560 tonnes of single use cylinders in Ontario
  • 11 returned through municipal programs
  • Parks Ontario collects

65
Pressurized Containers Trends Issues
Slide 65
  • Refillable system working well
  • Depressurized cylinders valuable as scrap metal
  • System for single use cylinders not developed
  • Opportunities to build on existing strong
    infrastructure

66
Pesticides/Fertilizers Profile
Slide 66
  • Products highly regulated by Health Canada
  • Fertilizer Act
  • Pest Control Products Act
  • 3 market segments
  • domestic household uses
  • commercial landscaping companies
  • agricultural farmers

67
Pesticides/Fertilizers Generation Collection
Slide 67
  • Largest uses for commercial agricultural
    application, but quantities not currently
    available
  • Domestic applications much smaller, but include a
    wide range of products companies
  • Over 800 tonnes of pesticide/fertilizers
    collected through municipal programs
  • Collected materials cannot be recycled

68
Pesticides/Fertilizers Trends Issues
Slide 68
  • Collection of pesticide empty containers in
    Ontario through CropLife
  • Will farmers use municipal systems as
    alternatives to CropLife network?
  • different handling requirements

69
Phase 1 Products Currently Collected Available
(tonnes)
Slide 69
Available
Currently Collected
70
Questions Answers
Slide 70
  • Use question/comment box, left of this screen

71
Break
Slide 71
72
Welcome Back!
Slide 72
73
Coming up
Slide 73
  • Program Management Options
  • Key Program Elements
  • Preparing to Meet Your Steward Obligations
  • Questions Answers
  • Summary

Reminder send in questions comments
74
Program Management Options
Slide 74
  • Mark Kurschner

75
Phase I Program Management Options
Slide 75
  • Ministers Letter
  • Program shall address diversion principles by
    providing financial and/or other incentives
    encouraging reduction, reuse and recycling
    activities.
  • 5h) Potential fees shall be used to maximize the
    management of MHSW through reduction, reuse and
    recycling and not to fund or promote the burning,
    landfilling or land application of MHSW unless
    the 3R options are not available or technically
    feasible.
  • 8h) A list of benchmarks and performance measures
    used to encourage 3Rs, promote best practices
    and encourage the development of innovative
    diversion techniques.

76
Input on Plan Options
Slide 76
  • Obtained from
  • Industry representatives at industry sector
    meetings held week of February 5
  • Service providers at meeting held February 1
  • Management options used in other stewardship
    programs

77
Options for Phase 1 Products (1)
Slide 77
Please see Handout 3
78
Options for Phase 1 Products (2)
Slide 78
  • Detailed in Handout 3
  • Available for download
  • Favour 3Rs over alternatives
  • 3Rs reduction, reuse recycling
  • alternatives EFW, incineration, non-hazardous
    hazardous landfill

79
Reduce Quantity Requiring Management
Slide 79
  • Through consumer education
  • consumable products "buy what you need, use what
    you buy supported by retailer advice (e.g.
    paint, solvents, fertilizers, pesticides)
  • proper storage (paints, solvents)
  • automotive products observe service intervals
    (antifreeze, oil filters, oil containers)
  • choose reusable options (e.g. batteries,
    pressurized containers)

80
Reduce Environmental Impact
Slide 80
  • Positive trends in industry
  • from oil based paints to latex (incidental
    reduction in solvent use for clean up)
  • motor technology improvements significantly
    extending or eliminating service intervals for
    antifreeze, oil filters, oil containers
  • DIY market declining for some products less
    packaging, unused product
  • reformulation alkaline batteries (mercury
    elimination), pesticides
  • product options water vs. solvent based
    products single use vs. rechargeable/refillable
    fertilizer vs. compost
  • options to change how sold priced

81
Local Centralized Reuse
Slide 81
  • Local Reuse
  • municipal giveaway programs mainly paint,
    requires support re product safety, liability
    labelling issues
  • Centralized Reuse
  • centralized (regional) reuse facilities may
    improve selection volumes
  • other options include Habitat for Humanity,
    theatre groups, anti- graffiti, etc.
  • small scale on-site reprocessing for small
    quantity ICI generators of antifreeze
    pressurized containers
  • reusable products rechargeable batteries,
    refillable pressurized containers

82
Collection Municipal Programs (1)
Slide 82
  • From WDO 3Rs Datacall for 2005
  • 89 municipal programs serving 11.4M people
  • 98 permanent depots
  • 270 event days
  • 15,836 tonnes MHSW collected
  • 1.39 kg per capita

83
Collection Municipal Programs (2)
Slide 83
  • Status
  • Weekly meetings between Project Team Municipal
    MHSW Task Group to discuss IFO-municipal
    relationship
  • Product Care/AMRC 2005 study surveyed recorded
    service levels mapped depot locations
  • WDO retained AMRC for 2 baseline data projects
  • accessibility study compile available MHSW
    municipal services user data (distance travelled,
    etc.)
  • cost study compile MHSW municipal services cost
    data (municipal, contracted, promotion
    education PE)

84
Collection Municipal Programs (3)
Slide 84
  • IFOmunicipal discussion
  • Basis for program accessibility targets
  • Roles responsibilities of IFO municipalities
  • defining municipal collection function
  • expected reduction in depot based handling (e.g.
    paint bulking) to allow better 3Rs utilization
  • post collection function shift to IFO
    responsibility
  • PE primarily shift to IFO responsibility
  • Servicing small quantity ICI generators
  • current certificates of approval typically
    restricted to household generators
  • transitional issues during current service
    contracts

85
Collection Other Programs
Slide 85
  • Antifreeze, oil filters containers current
    commercial services collect oil filters
    containers, but not all recycled
  • Pressurized containers existing commercial
    services collect/refill (if necessary recertify)
    rechargeable containers
  • Pesticides CropLife agricultural programs
  • container management
  • collection disposal of obsolete pesticides

86
Recycling
Slide 86
  • Significant recycling of some materials under
    current system
  • e.g. paint, oil filters, antifreeze, refillable
    propane tanks
  • Few opportunities significant room for
    improvement for many materials
  • for some products, recycling technology exists
    but is underdeveloped or underutilized
  • program expected to increase processing/market
    capacity
  • program expected to develop innovative diversion
    techniques
  • Essentially no opportunity for pesticides
    recycling

87
Non 3Rs Management Options Incineration,
Energy Recovery Landfill
Slide 87
  • WDA specifies programs shall not promote
    burning or landfill unless 3Rs options not
    available or not technically feasible
  • Some Phase 1 products currently being managed
    through burning landfilling
  • Challenges in moving from non-3Rs to 3Rs
    management
  • due to age, contamination, decomposition, etc.,
    some products not suitable for recycling

88
Key Program Elements
Slide 88
  • Derek Stephenson

89
Outline
Slide 89
  • Containers
  • Small quantity ICI generators
  • Targets
  • accessibility, collection, diversion
  • Costs
  • PE
  • fee setting
  • incentives
  • Phase 2 materials
  • Research Development

90
Containers
Slide 90
  • Ministers letter specified including
    containers
  • Fees apply only to containers not part of another
    WDO approved program
  • Containers will continue to be managed through
    existing systems wherever possible
  • Containers returned under program would be
    eligible cost

91
Small Quantity ICI Generators
Slide 91
  • Quantities uncertain
  • Number of businesses uncertain
  • Implications of Transportation of Dangerous Goods
    Regulation
  • Tracking of quantities generated delivered
  • Tracking to ensure generators below 100 kg/month
    threshold

92
Targets
Slide 92
  • Ministers letter specified plan must include
    collection diversion targets for each Phase 1
    material for 5 years
  • take into account reduction of total quantity of
    MHSW available for collection as result of
    program
  • Collection targets
  • includes 3Rs disposal
  • Diversion targets
  • only 3Rs management

93
Accessibility
Slide 93
  • Plan must include accessibility
  • methodology
  • targets
  • Urban, rural, northern considerations
  • Accessibility infrastructure options
  • events
  • permanent depots

94
Possible Accessibility Measures
Slide 94
  • Options
  • time traveled (e.g. 30 minutes, 60 minutes, etc.)
  • distance traveled (e.g. 20 km, 40 km, etc.)
  • hours of service per household per year (e.g. 1
    hour, 2 hours, etc.)
  • population within specified radius (e.g. 25,000,
    50,000, etc.)

95
Costs (1)
Slide 95
  • Concept of functional split
  • some costs borne 100 by municipalities
  • other costs borne 100 by stewards
  • For MHSW, Minister specified
  • post-collection paid for by stewards
  • collection remains responsibility of
    municipalities

96
Costs (2)
Slide 96
  • Finding a clear dividing line between
  • where collection ends post-collection
    begins?
  • need to resolve with municipalities
  • Would avoid
  • MHSW Financial Datacall
  • debates on service levels funding to best
    practices efficiency effectiveness

97
Promotion Education (1)
Slide 97
  • Ministers letter specified fees used for
    Promotion Education (PE) activities
  • Expectation MHSW program will include provincial
    communications plan
  • standardized PE material
  • posters, brochure, paint can stickers
  • distributed to point of purchase locations
  • website 1-800 number

98
Promotion Education (2)
Slide 98
  • Municipalities currently provide MHSW PE
  • Industry could support municipal PE
  • provide standardized brochures for municipal
    mail-outs
  • financial support for MHSW portion of calendars
  • promote special events

99
Fee Setting
Slide 99
  • Must meet requirements of WDA including nexus
  • Ministers letter Addendum specified Funding
    Rules, e.g.
  • shall consider capital costs to meet targets
  • shall consider options to internalize program
    costs
  • address MHSW from small quantity ICI generators
  • Must take into account
  • material specific costs
  • Stewardship Ontario shared program costs
  • Stewardship Ontario common costs

100
Incentives
Slide 100
  • Ministers letter specified plan must outline
  • financial incentives for
  • post collection, transfer, processing, diversion,
    disposal
  • capital to improve existing collection
    diversion infrastructure
  • eligibility criteria procedure
  • Intent
  • to maximize management of MHSW through 3Rs
  • not to fund or promote burning, landfilling or
    land application of MHSW unless 3R options not
    available or technically feasible

101
Phase 2 Materials
Slide 101
  • Shall include all items in Phase 1 along with
  • batteries other than single use dry cell
  • aerosol containers
  • portable fire extinguishers
  • fluorescent light bulbs tubes
  • pharmaceuticals sharps including syringes
  • mercury containing devices
  • Minister may request additional phases

102
Research Development (RD)
Slide 102
  • Ministers letter specified that program will
    describe funding provisions for RD activities to
    support increase effectiveness efficiency of
    MHSW collection diversion
  • Examples
  • expanding processing capacity
  • developing end use markets for collected materials

103
Preparing to Meet Your Steward Obligations
Slide 103
  • Gordon Day

104
Timelines
Slide 104
  • Submit plan to Minister on May 31
  • Post on ER minimum 30 days
  • Ministers approval by revised regulation to give
    Stewardship Ontario authority to implement
  • Stewardship Ontario required under WDA to notify
    stewards of potential obligations
  • Minimum 90 days following notification to
    assemble report data
  • Payment schedule TBD

105
Registration Reporting
Slide 105
  • 95 of stewards already in Stewardship Ontario
    database
  • Options to report data to Stewardship Ontario
  • modify existing system to handle MHSM
  • separate third party system
  • combinationoption for steward

106
Questions Answers
Slide 106
107
Summary
Slide 107
  • Derek Stephenson

108
How good is the picture we have shown?
Slide 108
  • Are estimates accurate for each material sold,
    available for collection, collected, recycled
    disposed?
  • Are options presented complete appropriate?
  • How might the picture be improved?

109
Consultation Process
Slide 109
  • We want your views!
  • Please email questions comments to
  • comments_at_stewardshipontario.ca
  • by 5 p.m., Thursday, February 22

110
Meeting Adjourned
Slide 110
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