Losing our Way in the Maze of Federal Mandates,NCLB, and Standardization: Whatever happened to Creat - PowerPoint PPT Presentation


Title: Losing our Way in the Maze of Federal Mandates,NCLB, and Standardization: Whatever happened to Creat


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Losing our Way in the Maze of Federal
Mandates,NCLB, and Standardization Whatever
happened to Creative Productivity in Gifted
Programs?
  • Sally M. Reis
  • Georgia State Conference on Gifted and Talented

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Theme One
  • Enrichment programs can offer rich, challenging
    curriculum in both regular and gifted education
    programs and make a profound difference in the
    lives of students.

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Theme Two
  • When teachers use enrichment-based approaches to
    learning and extend the pedagogy of gifted
    education to all children, learning is more
    engaging and enjoyable and all students to make
    continuous progress.

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Theme Three
  • The use of creative and joyful learning does not
    result in lower test scores! Rather, achievement
    can be increased when we use creative teaching
    methods, differentiated instruction and
    enrichment pedagogy.

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A Roadmap for today
  • What is currently happening in regular classrooms
    and in programs for gifted and talented youth?
  • Where are we going in our field?
  • What are our goals?
  • What do we hope our children will become?

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Summer School Story
  • In an urban district outside in a state not to be
    named,
  • 4000 elementary students (children with LD, low
    aptitude, low achievement) are going to summer
    school because they failed the state assessment.
  • What are you doing with them?
  • The same thing we did in school!
  • Did it work?

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Remediation and review dont always work!
  • It is time to give enrichment, strength-based
    learning, and talent development a chance!
  • What about letting children read books in which
    they have an interest?

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Students with Special Needs Its not just about
their deficits!
  • Sara and all of the IEP meetings and our friend,
    Susan Baum
  • Stop telling us what she cant do and start
    telling us what she can do..
  • Who is the most passionate teacher at this school?

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What happens?

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Drop outs
  • 7,000 students drop out per school day in
    America!

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Drop outs
  • In todays era of accountability, testing and No
    Child Left Behind, here is the most astonishing
    statistic in education an increasing number of
    researchers are finding that nearly one out of
    three public high school students won't graduate!
  • (CNN Report)

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Drop outs
  • For Latinos and African-Americans, the rate
    approaches an alarming 50 percent. Virtually no
    community, small or large, rural or urban, has
    escaped the problem.

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  • Public awareness of the problem is so low because
    data on graduation rates is often wrong, with
    states and localities using a wide variety of
    methods and standards for calculating dropout
    rates, and minimal state or federal oversight of
    graduation rates for accuracy, the report's
    authors contend. As a result, dropout data can be
    strikingly misleading. In some states, for
    example, a 5 percent dropout rate has been
    reported for African Americans, when the real
    number is closer to 50 percent.

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Look in my face, My name is might have been.
Dante Gabriel Rossetti
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Drop out Rates in Urban Areas
  • Fourteen urban school districts have on-time
    graduation rates lower than 50 they include
    Detroit, Baltimore, New York, Milwaukee,
    Cleveland, Los Angeles, Miami, Dallas, Denver and
    Houston

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Drop outs
  • A recent study finds that public schools graduate
    69.6 of an estimated 4 million eligible students
    each spring, meaning about 1.2 million students
    did not graduate this year. That means about
    7,000 students drop out per school day, Swanson
    says.

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Drop outs
Nearly 7 in 10 respondents (69 percent) said they
were not motivated or inspired to work hard, 80
percent did one hour or less of home- work each
day in high school, two-thirds would have worked
harder if more was demanded of them (higher
academic standards and more studying and
homework).
  • 47 percent of dropouts said classes weren't
    interesting and reported being bored and
    disengaged in school.
  • More than 80 percent said their chances of
    staying in school would have increased if classes
    were more interesting and provided opportunities
    for real-world learning.
  • The Silent Epidemic Perspectives on High School
    Dropouts

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W. Somerset Maugham said,
  • "The common idea that success spoils people by
    making them vain, egotistic, and self-complacent
    is erroneous on the contrary, it makes them, for
    the most part, humble, tolerant, and kind.
    Failure makes people bitter and cruel."

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Who will be the next ?
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Who will be the next?
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Why this topic?
  • Concerns about standardization
  • and NCLB
  • Fear about the absence of creativity, curiosity,
    a sense of adventure, and joyful learning
  • Concerns about minimal gifted programming, lack
    of challenge, low levels of differentiation, and
    low level programming

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The Japanese Ministers of Educations Visit to
the NRC
  • Why are you here?
  • You Americans have all the patents. We can make
    everything that the Americans invent faster and
    cheaper But we dont have the creative ideas and
    inventions.

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Fareed Zakaria
  • Singapores students do brilliantly in math and
    science tests. American kids test much worse but
    do better in the real world.
  • January 9, 2006 Newsweek, p.37

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  • We both have meritocracies. Yours is a talent
    meritocracy ours is an exam meritocracy. There
    are some parts of the intellect that we are not
    able to test well--like creativity, curiosity, a
    sense of adventure, ambition. Most of all,
    America has a culture of learning that challenges
    conventional wisdom, even it it means challenging
    authority. These are the areas where Singapore
    must learn from America.
  • Tharman Shanmugararatnam, Minister of Education
    in Singapore, ranked 1 in global science and
    math rankings in the world.

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THIS WEEK WE TOOK A TEST TO SEE IF WERE READY
FOR THE TEST THAT TESTS OUR TEST SKILLS
Wait until KINDERGARTEN
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How to Inspire Creativity
  • 1.) Awareness
  • 2.) Permission
  • 3.) Strategies
  • 4.) Practice

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Creativity - defined
  • The act of being able
  • to produce along new
  • and original lines.
  • Costa, 1985

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Creativity
  • In order for something to be creative it must be
    original
  • to the person who created it, and it must be
    useful or have a clear purpose.
  • Starko

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Creativity
  • In order for something to be creative, it must be
    new, useful, generative, or influential.
  • Csikszentmihalyi Simonton

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Early Gifted Program Goals
Students will be academically challenged and
engaged in learning. Students will explore and
develop their interests. Students will develop
their creativity and task commitment. Students
will be encouraged to become leaders committed to
social action and improving their world.
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Nobel Prize in Economicsfor his analysis of
intertemporal tradeoffs in macroeconomic policy
  • Edmund S. Phelps
  • Columbia University
  • New York, NY, USA
  • Born in 1933

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American Physics Nobel Prize winners
'transformed' physics, for their discovery of
the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic
microwave background radiation.
  • George F. Smoot of the Lawrence Berkeley National
    Laboratory in California, born in 1945.
  • John C. Mather of the NASA Goddard Space Flight
    Center in Greenbelt, Md, born in 1946.

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The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for studies of
the molecular basis of eukaryotic transcription
  • Roger D. Kornberg
  • Stanford University Stanford, CA,
  • Born in 1947

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The Nobel Prize in Medicine "for their
discovery of RNA interference - gene silencing by
double-stranded RNA"
  • Andrew Z. Fire
  • Stanford University
  • School of Medicine Stanford, CA
  • Born in 1959
  • Craig C. Mello
  • University of Massachusetts Medical School
    Worcester, MA
  • Born in 1960

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Expected Goals for Gifted Students Today
Students will achieve the highest scores.
Students reach advanced goals on the state
tests. Students will achieve high standards on
our state curriculum. Students will take as
many AP, IB, and master as much advanced content
as they can squeeze into a day .
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Peak Moments in School
  • Create memories!
  • Make learning enjoyable!
  • Help students develop their interests and
    creativity!

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The wedding of a former student
  • Ten years after they had graduated from high
    school, my former gifted students remembered
    every Type III study they had completed in
    elementary and secondary school!

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  • Sally,
  • A few years I emailed you about my doctoral
    program work and described my research in
    pharmacological chemistry. I also reminded you of
    all of the Type III products I did in the TAG
    Program. I finished with my doctorate and was
    invited to give a seminar at UCONN in the School
    o f Pharmacy next month. I was writing to see if
    you would be available for lunch and perhaps you
    can attend my seminar? Looking forward to
    reconnecting.
  • Sherry
  • Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics,
    University of California

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  • Dear Sally, do you remember me? I have written
    to you periodically during the last ten years. I
    write to tell you that I finished my doctorate
    last week and that I have regretted not staying
    in closer touch. I often think about why I was
    able to finish my degree-- a poor kid whose
    parents didnt even attend college. The courage
    and confidence to believe I could finish a Ph.D.
    came from my earliest years in the gifted program
    in Torrington. . . I think what made me want
    to pursue a career in research were my earliest
    Type III Projects.

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The TAG Program in Torrington
  • Began in 1976
  • Elementary, Middle School, and High School
    Services in Academics and in the Arts
  • Based on the Enrichment Triad Model
  • Original Pilot Site for the Revolving Door Model
    and the Schoolwide Enrichment Model

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WHAT MAKES GIFTEDNESS?
Task Commitment
Above Average Ability
Creativity
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TYPE I GENERAL EXPLORATORY ACTIVITIES
TYPE II GROUP TRAINING ACTIVITIES
TYPE III INDIVIDUAL SMALL GROUP INVESTIGATIONS
OF REAL PROBLEMS
Environment in General
Regular Classroom
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From the group of 6 students who worked on Bobby
Bones.
  • Four attended and graduated from Medical School!

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What Happens to Young, Creative Producers?
  • Karen Westberg
  • A Longitudinal Study of Students who Participated
    in a Program based on the Enrichment Triad Model
    in 1981-1984

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  • Grant during middle school invented a shoelace
    clip and continued to invent products during both
    middle school and high school.
  • At 28 years old, he completed his doctoral work
    at CalTech in aeronautical engineering, was
    employed at Hughes Aeronautical and continued his
    involvement in numerous creative projects,
  • Maintained his interests in creative writing with
    the completion of nine novels, all with
    futuristic settings and themes
  • These interests were documented on his
    interest-a-lyzer (Renzulli, 1977) relate to
    current activities.

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  • When asked what he would write if he could be an
    author of a famous childrens book, Grant
    responded that he would write science fiction.
  • Grant currently has an agent and has two science
    fiction books being considered for publication.

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Characteristics of High-Level Creative
Productivity A Longitudinal Study of Students
Identified by Renzullis Three-Ring Conception of
Giftedness
  • Marcia Delcourt
  • Strong childhood interests developed in the
    Enrichment Triad Program
  • Overall Importance of Projects

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  • Top 1 in 10,000 A 10-Year Follow-up of the
    Profoundly Gifted
  • David Lubinski, Rose Mary Webb, Martha J.
    Morelock and Camilla Persson Benbow
  • Journal of Applied Psychology, 2001, Volume 86,
    No 4, 718-729.

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  • 320 gifted students identified as adolescents who
    pursued doctoral degrees at over 50X the base
    rate expectations. (The base rate expectation
    for the general population is only 1--1 in
    100!).

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Follow-up Studies
  • Four Enrichment Programs in Connecticut
  • West Hartford, Avon, Simsbury, Talcott Mountain
    Science Center

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Kavita Shukla, Howard County, MDK-12 participant
in an SEM ProgramCentennial High
School..Michelle Bagley, High School GT
Specialist, supervised her research.
  • Funegreek, a spice, has antibacterial and
    antifungal properties research project,
    Baltimore Science Fair, Intel Search Finalist,
    Harvard grad, Ph.D. candidate

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Jody BourgeoisSimsbury Gifted ProgramType
III Proved that a land form was not really a
drumlin in a glaciers path through Connecticut,
but was instead, an ice channel deposit,
surprising the experts.
  • .

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She attended Barnard College at Columbia,
then
  • Completed a Ph.D. in Geology
  • Became a professor at the University of
    Washington
  • Authored the Standard Text on
  • Sedimentary Geology

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  • .

Steve Perlman--Participated in the West Hartford
Enrichment Program and worked on a research
project at Talcott Mountain Science Center where
he built his first computer. He attended
Columbia University where he invented a system
that enabled students to write papers from their
dorms and send them to the computer center
electronically.
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Steve was hired by Apple computers and was
instrumental in the development of the color
MacHe produced three independent start-up
companies and continued to be a high creative.
He got an idea and spent 3 days and nights
inventing the first tv set internet device and
started WebTV, the first product of a company
that he and his partners subsequently sold for
500 million dollars.
  • .

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Steve Perlman
  • Gave his first million dollars to Talcott
    Mountain Science Center as a donation!

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Dr. Linda Ivany
  • Paleontologist
  • Ph.D. Geology, Harvard University
  • Research Mass Extinction 34 years ago and new
    directions about global climate change and the
    history of our earth.
  • Gifted Program graduate from Connecticut

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Eric Fossum
  • Another Enrichment Program graduate from
    Connecticut
  • Interested in computers and photography
  • Attended Trinity College in Hartford
  • Yale for graduate school
  • Worked at NASAs jet propulsion lab where he used
    computer chips for photography.

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Jennifer Weiner
  • Another gifted program graduate from Connecticut
  • Interested in creative writing
  • Student of Jean Gubbins
  • Author of 3 books, two on the New York Times Book
    List.
  • including
  • Good in Bed
  • In Her Shoes..(Current Movie!)
  • Little Earthquakes

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Joyful Learning
  • In our Enrichment Triad Model program, the
    focus was on helping students become creative
    producers in an area they chose and loved--joyful
    learning

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Case Studies of Talented Readers in Third and
Seventh Grade Classrooms National Research
Center on the Gifted and Talented-UConn site
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Karen Westbergs research at the NRC-GT found
that
  • Students experienced no instructional or
    curricular differentiation in 84 of the
    activities in which they participated in
  • Reading Language Arts
  • Mathematics Social Studies
  • Science
  • (see graph on next slide!)

Westberg, K. L., Archambault, F. X., Jr., Dobyns,
S. M., Salvin, T. J. (1993). An observational
study of instructional and curricular practices
used with gifted and talented students in regular
classroom (Research Monograph 93104). Storrs,
CT The National Research Center on the Gifted
and Talented, University of Connecticut.
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Types of Differentiation in Which Target Gifted
Students Were Involved
No Differentiation Advanced Content Advanced
Process Advanced Product Indep. Study w/
Assigned Topic Indep. Study w/ Self-selected
Topic Other Differentiation
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Compare then and now..
  • In the 1970s, Alice had 3-5 hours a week of
    pull-out time. She had a high group of peers with
    whom she worked.. Her curriculum was compacted by
    70-80 and she had acceleration options.

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The sea is the place for a fisherman, For only
his ears know the true value of the sounds The
call of the gull to his mate, The slap of a wave
against a rock, The tides retreating from the
shore. A fish splashing to the surface, The waves
rocking against the boat.
The leaves fall At the mercy of the wind. Their
stems cracked, They glide away from the
tree, Softly landing on the ground. Among
others, Who experienced their fate.
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Lets compare.Alices poetry project withwhat
is happening in the years of NCLB
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Will this be on the Test?
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Do we want to be like Singapore?Do we want to be
like Japan?
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Martin Luther King explained believed that.
  • Not everybody can be famous, but everybody can be
    greatbecause greatness lies in finding
    passionate work, in service to others, in making
    a difference, and using ones talents to improve
    the world.

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Where are the opportunities for Creative Children?
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Melissa Poe -- Environmental Activist and founder
of Kids F.A.C.E.
  • Melissa Poe was 9 years old when she began a
    campaign Percy Priest Elementary in Nashville,
    Tennessee in 1989 for a cleaner environment by
    writing a letter to then President Bush. Through
    her own efforts, her letter was reproduced on
    over 250 donated billboards across the country.
  • The response to her plea for help was so
    overwhelming that Poe established Kids For A
    Cleaner Environment (Kids F.A.C.E.) in 1989.
    There are now 300,000 members of Kids FACE
    worldwide and is the world's largest youth
    environmental organization.

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Kids for a Clean Environment
  • Since the organization started, Kids F.A.C.E.
    members have distributed and planted over 1
    million trees! Ongoing tree-planting projects
    include the creation of Kid's Yards - backyard
    wildlife habitats and currently Kids F.A.C.E. is
    involved in several other environmental
    initiatives.

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Melinda Poe, founder of FACE
  • At 9 years old, I started the club for kids after
    seeing a program on TV, Highway to Heaven, that
    made me think, "What will the future world be
    like if we don't help take care of the
    environment today?" I didn't want to grow up in a
    world with a polluted environment. At the end of
    the program, however, Michael Landon, the actor,
    said something very important. He said, "It's not
    too late. People who care will do something!"
  • Melissa Poe

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Making a Difference--One Care Bag at a Time
  • Annie Wignall of Newton, IA founded Care Bags
    Foundation when she was eleven years old. Care
    Bags provides essential, fun, safe, and age
    appropriate things (games, toothbrushes, books,
    etc.) to kids during difficult times in their
    lives. Care bags go to over 800 abused, and
    displaced kids every year and are distributed by
    20 agencies serving over 80 towns in Iowa as well
    as going to other states for disaster relief.

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Kids Konnected founder Jon Wagner Holtz
  • Jon Wagner Holtz was 9-years-old when his mother
    was diagnosed with breast cancer. Feeling alone
    and confused, with no one his own age with whom
    to share his feelings, Jon set out to find other
    kids who felt the same way. When he was 11, he
    started a support group for children who have a
    parent with cancer, called Kids Konnected.
  • "I was not only worried for her I was worried
    for me. My biggest question was would she die? I
    really didn't know where to turn-what to do with
    my feelings of anger and guilt and most of all,
    fear.
  • Since 1992, Kids Konnected has provided outreach,
    education and support to more than 10,000 kids
    nationwide.

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Kids Konnected founder Jon Wagner Holtz
  • "There were no groups where I could talk to other
    kids who knew what it was like to have a real
    sick mom," Jon explains, so he created his own. 
  • Jon secured a grant in 1993 to operate a 24-hour
    hot line from his home, which soon led to
    the creation of more support groups, and by 1997,
    Kids Konnected was incorporated as a non-profit
    organization with 18 chapters in 12 states.
  • He trained a young member of the board of
    directors to take over as CEO when he leaves for
    college. "It's real important to continue Kids
    Konnected as a corporation that is run by kids,
    for kids," says Jon. 

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GAREN WOLFF, founder of The Official City-Prep
mentoring program
  • When Garen Wolff was in middle school, she
    noticed that girls with older sisters and
    brothers were often better at managing school
    work, exploring opportunities and getting along
    with other girls.
  • She founded The Official City-Prep mentoring
    program. Official City-Prep helps middle school
    girls of all races improve their self-esteem, do
    better on standardized tests and deal with social
    challenges by pairing 6th and 8th grade girls
    with seniors in high school.

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Carolyn's Compassionate Children
  • Carolyn Rubenstein founded Carolyn's
    Compassionate Children in 1999 when she was 13
    years old. Carolyn's Compassionate Children is a
    support organization linking critically ill
    childen and children with life challenges with
    volunteer teens in schools through letter
    writing. The organization has since expanded to
    include organizing annual school supply, holiday
    letter, and gift drives and awarding college
    scholarships.

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Carolyn Rubenstein today, Baldwin Scholar, Duke
  • I have had a passion for helping critically ill
    children since a visit to Camp Sunshine in Casco,
    Maine when I was just six years old. Camp
    Sunshine is a retreat for children with
    life-threatening illnesses and their families. I
    volunteered at the camp in middle school. Because
    of these experiences, I founded a program for
    critically ill children, Carolyn's Compassionate
    Children, that links home bound or hospitalized
    children with their "healthy" peers through pen
    pal relationships. In addition to being a pen pal
    network, Carolyn's Compassionate Children awards
    ten college scholarships annually to childhood
    cancer survivors.

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ROVION REED, founder of Arms Up
  • When I looked at my freshman yearbook and compare
    it to my senior book, I see a lot of friends who
    came into high school with me, but did not
    graduate.
  • Many of my used-to-be friends are either selling
    drugs, doing time, or dead.
  • You're probably thinking, why didn't I end up
    like them? I chose the alternative
  • I started Arms Up, a group that encourages young
    black men to volunteer at a daycare center or
    food pantry. And guess what, fewer of my friends
    are dropping out.

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Chi-Chi Hsieh, founder of an after school
computer Program for kids
  • When I was in high school, I raised money to
    start an after-school computer class for
    elementary school kids. I organized 12 other
    volunteers and now the program is open four days
    every week.
  • We teach kids about computers and we give them a
    safe, productive place to hang out. We make it a
    priority to get to know all the kids build a
    real relationship. That way, there's always
    somebody standing right there with them as they
    pursue their dreams and finish school.

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Aubyn Burnside with Suitcases for Kids
  • When 11-year-old Aubyn Burnside heard about how
    many children in foster care programs are forced
    to carry their belongings in garbage bags because
    they cannot afford suitcases, she was shocked and
    saddened. "I thought they must feel like garbage
    themselves," she said. So, Aubyn founded
    Suitcases for Kids, dedicating herself to
    ensuring that every child in foster care would
    have a bag of his or her own.

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Then and now!
  • In the beginning, Aubyn spent her time making
    posters and local speeches in her community of
    Hickory, North Carolina. "In January of 1995, I
    expected to start seeing some donations of
    suitcases.
  • But when she received nothing. Determined not to
    give up, Aubyn and her mother visited the
    Salvation Army, and purchased 31 suitcases for
    15. This helped launch her organization and
    eventually donor suitcases started arriving in
    mass quantities.
  • Six years later, Aubyn has collected over 25,000
    suitcases, and her charity has chapters in every
    state and in over ten foreign countries..
  • But, Aubyn is modest about her organization's
    overwhelming success. "It has to be a shocking
    experience for these kids," she says, "and I just
    wanted to help.

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Brandon Keefe, founder of Bookends
  • Brandon went to a Board of Directors meeting at
    Hollygrove Children's Home with his mother.
    Hollygrove is a residential treatment center for
    abused and neglected children where she served as
    CEO and President.
  • Brandon sat in a corner with his hand-held video
    game. The adults listed a litany of obstacles to
    creating a library (e.g., books were too
    expensive, volunteers were scarce and the budget
    couldn't be stretched any farther).

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Merry Christmas, Mom!
  • Brandon convinced his fellow classmates to help,
    "Everybody has books on their shelves that
    they've outgrown. Why not give the ones we've
    already read (which were still in good condition)
    to kids who need them? They collected 847 new
    and slightly used books that included
    biographies, mysteries, science fiction, fairy
    tales, picture books, and bestseller series.
  • On the last day of school before winter vacation,
    as his mother came to pick him up, a grinning
    Brandon stood on the sidewalk surrounded by
    dozens of boxes of books and exclaimed, "Merry
    Christmas, Mom!"

105
Bookends by Brandon
  • What began as a community service project for his
    class is now the grassroots nonprofit
    organization BookEnds, which has given away
    76,000 books to children in need, has completed
    23 libraries and has 19 other libraries in
    development. This will result in books and
    improved literacy opportunities for more than
    33,000 underprivileged kids and their families.
    Brandon, explained his mother, started this
    community.

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Brandon today
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     Jacob Komar, Founder and CEO of Computers
for Communities, Inc. and a Davidson Scholar
  • Jacob Komar, age 13, from Burlington, CT,
    created Computers for Communities, Inc. in
    order to help close the digital divide. Four
    years ago he observed that well-off families had
    computers but those who were poor did not. He
    also saw thousands of outdated computers being
    discarded. Jacob put these two problems together
    and fashioned a solution. Given his amazing
    skills, he and other friends so far have been
    able to rebuild and give away over 1,000
    computers to families in need. He started the
    company when he was 9 years old!

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In Jacobs words.
  • Since I am a computer fanatic, I was shocked when
    I learned that my sister's school was throwing
    away their old computers. I knew that there were
    many kids who didn't have computers at home.
  • I started a program called "Computers for
    Communities." First, I secured the school
    district's approval to take more than 60 old
    computers. Then I went to work restoring and
    upgrading them. I also had to get software
    licensing and install new software and hardware.
    I worked with the Department of Social Services
    to identify those most in need in my community.
    Finally, I installed them and have taught over
    200 family members how to use them.

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  • NVIDIA Joins Forces with Jacob Komar,
    Twelve-Year-Old Founder of Computers for
    CommunitiesSilicon Valley Companies Work
    Together to Provide Technology Resources to Those
    in NeedSANTA CLARA, CADECEMBER 9, 2004NVIDIA
    Corporation (Nasdaq NVDA) today announced that
    it is hosting Silicon Valleys first Computers
    for Communities event.  A Connecticut-based
    non-profit organization, Computers for
    Communities was founded in 2001 by Jacob Komar,
    now twelve years old, after he discovered a
    roomful of discarded computers at his sisters
    school and realized there must be a better use
    for them. His premise was simple collect
    computers that are to be discarded, then
    refurbish and redistribute them to those in need.

110
  • "It's not too late. People who care will do
    something!"

111
The creative product interests of
students affected their post-secondary plans. In
many cases, their career interests were a
synthesis of their early Type III interests as
young children, leading to . . . Type IV--life
and career choices based on interests and
according to Baum, Hebert and Renzulli, reversed
their underachievement!
  • .

112
These types of creative learning activities would
not have happened without the sustained time that
gifted and talented students had in a gifted
program.. They would not have occurred within
regular classroom differentiated instruction.This
is why gifted program services are so
important--a continuum of services! And working
with parents!
113
Now, compare that.
  • What seems to be valued
  • by most politicians (except those in
    Colorado), many administrators, and even
  • the general public today?

114
Will this be on the Test?
115
What should children learn from gifted and
enrichment programs?
  • TIME to pursue their interests in areas they
    choose

116
What else? Exposure to topics children may love
117

Identification of their abilities and talents,
interests and styles. Who should have these
opportunities?
118
Students with special needs Its not just about
their deficits!
  • Sara and all of the IEP meetings! Why didnt I
    know what to ask?
  • Our friend, Susan Baum
  • Stop telling us what she cant do and start
    telling us what she can do..
  • Who is the most passionate teacher at this school?

119
Graduation from Miss Porters
  • High School experiences caused her to be
    depressed, worried, anxious, and to feel she was
    not good at anything..
  • Miss Porters School transition

120
Talent Development, Not Deficit Reduction!
  • Stop focusing on deficits and start focusing on
    strengths!

121
Baums Study of Using Enrichment Triad Model with
Students with LD
  • Creative Type III studies, when used as an
    intervention with high ability, learning disabled
    students, was associated with improvement in the
    students' behavior, specifically the ability to
    self-regulate time on task improve self-esteem
    and development specific learning strategies.

122
What Else Matters?
  • Timing and chance matter
  • Parents and teachers impact and influence
    Permission to be CREATIVE
  • Engaging, in-depth learning experiences based on
    interests
  • Changed Instruction and Pedagogy!

123
pportunities
esources
ncouragement
124
What Else Matters?
  • Creative work that makes a difference
  • A sense of purpose and destiny..
  • I had something inside of me that had to come
    out!

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127
What Else Matters?
  • Understanding the methods of practicing
    professional
  • Understanding the tools of the discipline!

128
  • What else matters in programs for gifted and
    talented students? What makes a difference in
    their subsequent lives, education, and work?

129
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130
Renzulli Learning--currently over 35,000
enrichment activities.
  • A dozen (or more) teaching assistants can enable
    you to challenge each student both in school and
    at home

131
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132
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133
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135
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136
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137
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138
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139
  • What else matters? Opportunities for Continuous
    Progress and Differentiated
  • Learning!

140
E
Enjoyment
Engagement
Enthusiasm
141
What Else Matters?
  • Understanding that ones gifts and talents can be
    used to make the world a better placeeven the
    immediate world of one small child.

142
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143
Now, compare that.
  • What seems to be valued by most politicians, many
    administrators, and even the general public
    today?

144
Will this be on the Test?
145
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146
AAre we Losing our Way..
  • In the Current Maze of Federal Mandates,
    Advanced Content, and Standardization?
  • Opportunities for Creative Productivity and
    Innovation must Be Integrated into Gifted and
    Talented Programs!the Maze of Federal Mandates,
    Advanced Content, and Standardization Whatever
    Happened to Creative Productivity as a Primary
    Goal of Gifted Educat

147
Schools should be places for Talent Development!
Latent talents
Emerging talents
Developed talents and gifts!
148
E. Paul Torrance Manifesto for Children
  • Dont be afraid to fall in love with something
    and pursue it with intensity.
  • Know, understand, take pride in, practice,
    develop, exploit, and enjoy your greatest
    strengths.
  • Find a great teacher or mentor who will help you.
  • Dont waste energy trying to be well rounded.
  • Do what you love and can do well.
  • ?

149
-Jane Goodall
  • Every individual matters.
  • Every individual has a role to play.
  • Every individual makes a difference.
  • And we have a choice
  • What sort of difference do we want to make?"
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Title: Losing our Way in the Maze of Federal Mandates,NCLB, and Standardization: Whatever happened to Creat


1
Losing our Way in the Maze of Federal
Mandates,NCLB, and Standardization Whatever
happened to Creative Productivity in Gifted
Programs?
  • Sally M. Reis
  • Georgia State Conference on Gifted and Talented

2
Theme One
  • Enrichment programs can offer rich, challenging
    curriculum in both regular and gifted education
    programs and make a profound difference in the
    lives of students.

3
Theme Two
  • When teachers use enrichment-based approaches to
    learning and extend the pedagogy of gifted
    education to all children, learning is more
    engaging and enjoyable and all students to make
    continuous progress.

4
Theme Three
  • The use of creative and joyful learning does not
    result in lower test scores! Rather, achievement
    can be increased when we use creative teaching
    methods, differentiated instruction and
    enrichment pedagogy.

5
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6
A Roadmap for today
  • What is currently happening in regular classrooms
    and in programs for gifted and talented youth?
  • Where are we going in our field?
  • What are our goals?
  • What do we hope our children will become?

7
Summer School Story
  • In an urban district outside in a state not to be
    named,
  • 4000 elementary students (children with LD, low
    aptitude, low achievement) are going to summer
    school because they failed the state assessment.
  • What are you doing with them?
  • The same thing we did in school!
  • Did it work?

8
Remediation and review dont always work!
  • It is time to give enrichment, strength-based
    learning, and talent development a chance!
  • What about letting children read books in which
    they have an interest?

9
Students with Special Needs Its not just about
their deficits!
  • Sara and all of the IEP meetings and our friend,
    Susan Baum
  • Stop telling us what she cant do and start
    telling us what she can do..
  • Who is the most passionate teacher at this school?

10
What happens?

11
Drop outs
  • 7,000 students drop out per school day in
    America!

12
Drop outs
  • In todays era of accountability, testing and No
    Child Left Behind, here is the most astonishing
    statistic in education an increasing number of
    researchers are finding that nearly one out of
    three public high school students won't graduate!
  • (CNN Report)

13
Drop outs
  • For Latinos and African-Americans, the rate
    approaches an alarming 50 percent. Virtually no
    community, small or large, rural or urban, has
    escaped the problem.

14
  • Public awareness of the problem is so low because
    data on graduation rates is often wrong, with
    states and localities using a wide variety of
    methods and standards for calculating dropout
    rates, and minimal state or federal oversight of
    graduation rates for accuracy, the report's
    authors contend. As a result, dropout data can be
    strikingly misleading. In some states, for
    example, a 5 percent dropout rate has been
    reported for African Americans, when the real
    number is closer to 50 percent.

15
Look in my face, My name is might have been.
Dante Gabriel Rossetti
16
Drop out Rates in Urban Areas
  • Fourteen urban school districts have on-time
    graduation rates lower than 50 they include
    Detroit, Baltimore, New York, Milwaukee,
    Cleveland, Los Angeles, Miami, Dallas, Denver and
    Houston

17
Drop outs
  • A recent study finds that public schools graduate
    69.6 of an estimated 4 million eligible students
    each spring, meaning about 1.2 million students
    did not graduate this year. That means about
    7,000 students drop out per school day, Swanson
    says.

18
Drop outs
Nearly 7 in 10 respondents (69 percent) said they
were not motivated or inspired to work hard, 80
percent did one hour or less of home- work each
day in high school, two-thirds would have worked
harder if more was demanded of them (higher
academic standards and more studying and
homework).
  • 47 percent of dropouts said classes weren't
    interesting and reported being bored and
    disengaged in school.
  • More than 80 percent said their chances of
    staying in school would have increased if classes
    were more interesting and provided opportunities
    for real-world learning.
  • The Silent Epidemic Perspectives on High School
    Dropouts

19
W. Somerset Maugham said,
  • "The common idea that success spoils people by
    making them vain, egotistic, and self-complacent
    is erroneous on the contrary, it makes them, for
    the most part, humble, tolerant, and kind.
    Failure makes people bitter and cruel."

20
Who will be the next ?
21
Who will be the next?
22
Why this topic?
  • Concerns about standardization
  • and NCLB
  • Fear about the absence of creativity, curiosity,
    a sense of adventure, and joyful learning
  • Concerns about minimal gifted programming, lack
    of challenge, low levels of differentiation, and
    low level programming

23
The Japanese Ministers of Educations Visit to
the NRC
  • Why are you here?
  • You Americans have all the patents. We can make
    everything that the Americans invent faster and
    cheaper But we dont have the creative ideas and
    inventions.

24
Fareed Zakaria
  • Singapores students do brilliantly in math and
    science tests. American kids test much worse but
    do better in the real world.
  • January 9, 2006 Newsweek, p.37

25
  • We both have meritocracies. Yours is a talent
    meritocracy ours is an exam meritocracy. There
    are some parts of the intellect that we are not
    able to test well--like creativity, curiosity, a
    sense of adventure, ambition. Most of all,
    America has a culture of learning that challenges
    conventional wisdom, even it it means challenging
    authority. These are the areas where Singapore
    must learn from America.
  • Tharman Shanmugararatnam, Minister of Education
    in Singapore, ranked 1 in global science and
    math rankings in the world.

26
THIS WEEK WE TOOK A TEST TO SEE IF WERE READY
FOR THE TEST THAT TESTS OUR TEST SKILLS
Wait until KINDERGARTEN
27
How to Inspire Creativity
  • 1.) Awareness
  • 2.) Permission
  • 3.) Strategies
  • 4.) Practice

28
Creativity - defined
  • The act of being able
  • to produce along new
  • and original lines.
  • Costa, 1985

29
Creativity
  • In order for something to be creative it must be
    original
  • to the person who created it, and it must be
    useful or have a clear purpose.
  • Starko

30
Creativity
  • In order for something to be creative, it must be
    new, useful, generative, or influential.
  • Csikszentmihalyi Simonton

31
Early Gifted Program Goals
Students will be academically challenged and
engaged in learning. Students will explore and
develop their interests. Students will develop
their creativity and task commitment. Students
will be encouraged to become leaders committed to
social action and improving their world.
32
Nobel Prize in Economicsfor his analysis of
intertemporal tradeoffs in macroeconomic policy
  • Edmund S. Phelps
  • Columbia University
  • New York, NY, USA
  • Born in 1933

33
American Physics Nobel Prize winners
'transformed' physics, for their discovery of
the blackbody form and anisotropy of the cosmic
microwave background radiation.
  • George F. Smoot of the Lawrence Berkeley National
    Laboratory in California, born in 1945.
  • John C. Mather of the NASA Goddard Space Flight
    Center in Greenbelt, Md, born in 1946.

34
The Nobel Prize in Chemistry for studies of
the molecular basis of eukaryotic transcription
  • Roger D. Kornberg
  • Stanford University Stanford, CA,
  • Born in 1947

35
The Nobel Prize in Medicine "for their
discovery of RNA interference - gene silencing by
double-stranded RNA"
  • Andrew Z. Fire
  • Stanford University
  • School of Medicine Stanford, CA
  • Born in 1959
  • Craig C. Mello
  • University of Massachusetts Medical School
    Worcester, MA
  • Born in 1960

36
Expected Goals for Gifted Students Today
Students will achieve the highest scores.
Students reach advanced goals on the state
tests. Students will achieve high standards on
our state curriculum. Students will take as
many AP, IB, and master as much advanced content
as they can squeeze into a day .
37
Peak Moments in School
  • Create memories!
  • Make learning enjoyable!
  • Help students develop their interests and
    creativity!

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39
The wedding of a former student
  • Ten years after they had graduated from high
    school, my former gifted students remembered
    every Type III study they had completed in
    elementary and secondary school!

40
  • Sally,
  • A few years I emailed you about my doctoral
    program work and described my research in
    pharmacological chemistry. I also reminded you of
    all of the Type III products I did in the TAG
    Program. I finished with my doctorate and was
    invited to give a seminar at UCONN in the School
    o f Pharmacy next month. I was writing to see if
    you would be available for lunch and perhaps you
    can attend my seminar? Looking forward to
    reconnecting.
  • Sherry
  • Department of Biochemistry and Biophysics,
    University of California

41
  • Dear Sally, do you remember me? I have written
    to you periodically during the last ten years. I
    write to tell you that I finished my doctorate
    last week and that I have regretted not staying
    in closer touch. I often think about why I was
    able to finish my degree-- a poor kid whose
    parents didnt even attend college. The courage
    and confidence to believe I could finish a Ph.D.
    came from my earliest years in the gifted program
    in Torrington. . . I think what made me want
    to pursue a career in research were my earliest
    Type III Projects.

42
The TAG Program in Torrington
  • Began in 1976
  • Elementary, Middle School, and High School
    Services in Academics and in the Arts
  • Based on the Enrichment Triad Model
  • Original Pilot Site for the Revolving Door Model
    and the Schoolwide Enrichment Model

43
WHAT MAKES GIFTEDNESS?
Task Commitment
Above Average Ability
Creativity
44
TYPE I GENERAL EXPLORATORY ACTIVITIES
TYPE II GROUP TRAINING ACTIVITIES
TYPE III INDIVIDUAL SMALL GROUP INVESTIGATIONS
OF REAL PROBLEMS
Environment in General
Regular Classroom
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From the group of 6 students who worked on Bobby
Bones.
  • Four attended and graduated from Medical School!

47
What Happens to Young, Creative Producers?
  • Karen Westberg
  • A Longitudinal Study of Students who Participated
    in a Program based on the Enrichment Triad Model
    in 1981-1984

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49
  • Grant during middle school invented a shoelace
    clip and continued to invent products during both
    middle school and high school.
  • At 28 years old, he completed his doctoral work
    at CalTech in aeronautical engineering, was
    employed at Hughes Aeronautical and continued his
    involvement in numerous creative projects,
  • Maintained his interests in creative writing with
    the completion of nine novels, all with
    futuristic settings and themes
  • These interests were documented on his
    interest-a-lyzer (Renzulli, 1977) relate to
    current activities.

50
  • When asked what he would write if he could be an
    author of a famous childrens book, Grant
    responded that he would write science fiction.
  • Grant currently has an agent and has two science
    fiction books being considered for publication.

51
Characteristics of High-Level Creative
Productivity A Longitudinal Study of Students
Identified by Renzullis Three-Ring Conception of
Giftedness
  • Marcia Delcourt
  • Strong childhood interests developed in the
    Enrichment Triad Program
  • Overall Importance of Projects

52
  • Top 1 in 10,000 A 10-Year Follow-up of the
    Profoundly Gifted
  • David Lubinski, Rose Mary Webb, Martha J.
    Morelock and Camilla Persson Benbow
  • Journal of Applied Psychology, 2001, Volume 86,
    No 4, 718-729.

53
  • 320 gifted students identified as adolescents who
    pursued doctoral degrees at over 50X the base
    rate expectations. (The base rate expectation
    for the general population is only 1--1 in
    100!).

54
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56
Follow-up Studies
  • Four Enrichment Programs in Connecticut
  • West Hartford, Avon, Simsbury, Talcott Mountain
    Science Center

57
Kavita Shukla, Howard County, MDK-12 participant
in an SEM ProgramCentennial High
School..Michelle Bagley, High School GT
Specialist, supervised her research.
  • Funegreek, a spice, has antibacterial and
    antifungal properties research project,
    Baltimore Science Fair, Intel Search Finalist,
    Harvard grad, Ph.D. candidate

58
Jody BourgeoisSimsbury Gifted ProgramType
III Proved that a land form was not really a
drumlin in a glaciers path through Connecticut,
but was instead, an ice channel deposit,
surprising the experts.
  • .

59
She attended Barnard College at Columbia,
then
  • Completed a Ph.D. in Geology
  • Became a professor at the University of
    Washington
  • Authored the Standard Text on
  • Sedimentary Geology

60
  • .

Steve Perlman--Participated in the West Hartford
Enrichment Program and worked on a research
project at Talcott Mountain Science Center where
he built his first computer. He attended
Columbia University where he invented a system
that enabled students to write papers from their
dorms and send them to the computer center
electronically.
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Steve was hired by Apple computers and was
instrumental in the development of the color
MacHe produced three independent start-up
companies and continued to be a high creative.
He got an idea and spent 3 days and nights
inventing the first tv set internet device and
started WebTV, the first product of a company
that he and his partners subsequently sold for
500 million dollars.
  • .

63
Steve Perlman
  • Gave his first million dollars to Talcott
    Mountain Science Center as a donation!

64
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65
Dr. Linda Ivany
  • Paleontologist
  • Ph.D. Geology, Harvard University
  • Research Mass Extinction 34 years ago and new
    directions about global climate change and the
    history of our earth.
  • Gifted Program graduate from Connecticut

66
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67
Eric Fossum
  • Another Enrichment Program graduate from
    Connecticut
  • Interested in computers and photography
  • Attended Trinity College in Hartford
  • Yale for graduate school
  • Worked at NASAs jet propulsion lab where he used
    computer chips for photography.

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70
Jennifer Weiner
  • Another gifted program graduate from Connecticut
  • Interested in creative writing
  • Student of Jean Gubbins
  • Author of 3 books, two on the New York Times Book
    List.
  • including
  • Good in Bed
  • In Her Shoes..(Current Movie!)
  • Little Earthquakes

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73
Joyful Learning
  • In our Enrichment Triad Model program, the
    focus was on helping students become creative
    producers in an area they chose and loved--joyful
    learning

74
Case Studies of Talented Readers in Third and
Seventh Grade Classrooms National Research
Center on the Gifted and Talented-UConn site
75
Karen Westbergs research at the NRC-GT found
that
  • Students experienced no instructional or
    curricular differentiation in 84 of the
    activities in which they participated in
  • Reading Language Arts
  • Mathematics Social Studies
  • Science
  • (see graph on next slide!)

Westberg, K. L., Archambault, F. X., Jr., Dobyns,
S. M., Salvin, T. J. (1993). An observational
study of instructional and curricular practices
used with gifted and talented students in regular
classroom (Research Monograph 93104). Storrs,
CT The National Research Center on the Gifted
and Talented, University of Connecticut.
76
Types of Differentiation in Which Target Gifted
Students Were Involved
No Differentiation Advanced Content Advanced
Process Advanced Product Indep. Study w/
Assigned Topic Indep. Study w/ Self-selected
Topic Other Differentiation
77
Compare then and now..
  • In the 1970s, Alice had 3-5 hours a week of
    pull-out time. She had a high group of peers with
    whom she worked.. Her curriculum was compacted by
    70-80 and she had acceleration options.

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The sea is the place for a fisherman, For only
his ears know the true value of the sounds The
call of the gull to his mate, The slap of a wave
against a rock, The tides retreating from the
shore. A fish splashing to the surface, The waves
rocking against the boat.
The leaves fall At the mercy of the wind. Their
stems cracked, They glide away from the
tree, Softly landing on the ground. Among
others, Who experienced their fate.
80
Lets compare.Alices poetry project withwhat
is happening in the years of NCLB
81
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85
Will this be on the Test?
86
Do we want to be like Singapore?Do we want to be
like Japan?
87
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88
Martin Luther King explained believed that.
  • Not everybody can be famous, but everybody can be
    greatbecause greatness lies in finding
    passionate work, in service to others, in making
    a difference, and using ones talents to improve
    the world.

89
Where are the opportunities for Creative Children?
90
Melissa Poe -- Environmental Activist and founder
of Kids F.A.C.E.
  • Melissa Poe was 9 years old when she began a
    campaign Percy Priest Elementary in Nashville,
    Tennessee in 1989 for a cleaner environment by
    writing a letter to then President Bush. Through
    her own efforts, her letter was reproduced on
    over 250 donated billboards across the country.
  • The response to her plea for help was so
    overwhelming that Poe established Kids For A
    Cleaner Environment (Kids F.A.C.E.) in 1989.
    There are now 300,000 members of Kids FACE
    worldwide and is the world's largest youth
    environmental organization.

91
Kids for a Clean Environment
  • Since the organization started, Kids F.A.C.E.
    members have distributed and planted over 1
    million trees! Ongoing tree-planting projects
    include the creation of Kid's Yards - backyard
    wildlife habitats and currently Kids F.A.C.E. is
    involved in several other environmental
    initiatives.

92
Melinda Poe, founder of FACE
  • At 9 years old, I started the club for kids after
    seeing a program on TV, Highway to Heaven, that
    made me think, "What will the future world be
    like if we don't help take care of the
    environment today?" I didn't want to grow up in a
    world with a polluted environment. At the end of
    the program, however, Michael Landon, the actor,
    said something very important. He said, "It's not
    too late. People who care will do something!"
  • Melissa Poe

93
Making a Difference--One Care Bag at a Time
  • Annie Wignall of Newton, IA founded Care Bags
    Foundation when she was eleven years old. Care
    Bags provides essential, fun, safe, and age
    appropriate things (games, toothbrushes, books,
    etc.) to kids during difficult times in their
    lives. Care bags go to over 800 abused, and
    displaced kids every year and are distributed by
    20 agencies serving over 80 towns in Iowa as well
    as going to other states for disaster relief.

94
Kids Konnected founder Jon Wagner Holtz
  • Jon Wagner Holtz was 9-years-old when his mother
    was diagnosed with breast cancer. Feeling alone
    and confused, with no one his own age with whom
    to share his feelings, Jon set out to find other
    kids who felt the same way. When he was 11, he
    started a support group for children who have a
    parent with cancer, called Kids Konnected.
  • "I was not only worried for her I was worried
    for me. My biggest question was would she die? I
    really didn't know where to turn-what to do with
    my feelings of anger and guilt and most of all,
    fear.
  • Since 1992, Kids Konnected has provided outreach,
    education and support to more than 10,000 kids
    nationwide.

95
Kids Konnected founder Jon Wagner Holtz
  • "There were no groups where I could talk to other
    kids who knew what it was like to have a real
    sick mom," Jon explains, so he created his own. 
  • Jon secured a grant in 1993 to operate a 24-hour
    hot line from his home, which soon led to
    the creation of more support groups, and by 1997,
    Kids Konnected was incorporated as a non-profit
    organization with 18 chapters in 12 states.
  • He trained a young member of the board of
    directors to take over as CEO when he leaves for
    college. "It's real important to continue Kids
    Konnected as a corporation that is run by kids,
    for kids," says Jon. 

96
GAREN WOLFF, founder of The Official City-Prep
mentoring program
  • When Garen Wolff was in middle school, she
    noticed that girls with older sisters and
    brothers were often better at managing school
    work, exploring opportunities and getting along
    with other girls.
  • She founded The Official City-Prep mentoring
    program. Official City-Prep helps middle school
    girls of all races improve their self-esteem, do
    better on standardized tests and deal with social
    challenges by pairing 6th and 8th grade girls
    with seniors in high school.

97
Carolyn's Compassionate Children
  • Carolyn Rubenstein founded Carolyn's
    Compassionate Children in 1999 when she was 13
    years old. Carolyn's Compassionate Children is a
    support organization linking critically ill
    childen and children with life challenges with
    volunteer teens in schools through letter
    writing. The organization has since expanded to
    include organizing annual school supply, holiday
    letter, and gift drives and awarding college
    scholarships.

98
Carolyn Rubenstein today, Baldwin Scholar, Duke
  • I have had a passion for helping critically ill
    children since a visit to Camp Sunshine in Casco,
    Maine when I was just six years old. Camp
    Sunshine is a retreat for children with
    life-threatening illnesses and their families. I
    volunteered at the camp in middle school. Because
    of these experiences, I founded a program for
    critically ill children, Carolyn's Compassionate
    Children, that links home bound or hospitalized
    children with their "healthy" peers through pen
    pal relationships. In addition to being a pen pal
    network, Carolyn's Compassionate Children awards
    ten college scholarships annually to childhood
    cancer survivors.

99
ROVION REED, founder of Arms Up
  • When I looked at my freshman yearbook and compare
    it to my senior book, I see a lot of friends who
    came into high school with me, but did not
    graduate.
  • Many of my used-to-be friends are either selling
    drugs, doing time, or dead.
  • You're probably thinking, why didn't I end up
    like them? I chose the alternative
  • I started Arms Up, a group that encourages young
    black men to volunteer at a daycare center or
    food pantry. And guess what, fewer of my friends
    are dropping out.

100
Chi-Chi Hsieh, founder of an after school
computer Program for kids
  • When I was in high school, I raised money to
    start an after-school computer class for
    elementary school kids. I organized 12 other
    volunteers and now the program is open four days
    every week.
  • We teach kids about computers and we give them a
    safe, productive place to hang out. We make it a
    priority to get to know all the kids build a
    real relationship. That way, there's always
    somebody standing right there with them as they
    pursue their dreams and finish school.

101
Aubyn Burnside with Suitcases for Kids
  • When 11-year-old Aubyn Burnside heard about how
    many children in foster care programs are forced
    to carry their belongings in garbage bags because
    they cannot afford suitcases, she was shocked and
    saddened. "I thought they must feel like garbage
    themselves," she said. So, Aubyn founded
    Suitcases for Kids, dedicating herself to
    ensuring that every child in foster care would
    have a bag of his or her own.

102
Then and now!
  • In the beginning, Aubyn spent her time making
    posters and local speeches in her community of
    Hickory, North Carolina. "In January of 1995, I
    expected to start seeing some donations of
    suitcases.
  • But when she received nothing. Determined not to
    give up, Aubyn and her mother visited the
    Salvation Army, and purchased 31 suitcases for
    15. This helped launch her organization and
    eventually donor suitcases started arriving in
    mass quantities.
  • Six years later, Aubyn has collected over 25,000
    suitcases, and her charity has chapters in every
    state and in over ten foreign countries..
  • But, Aubyn is modest about her organization's
    overwhelming success. "It has to be a shocking
    experience for these kids," she says, "and I just
    wanted to help.

103
Brandon Keefe, founder of Bookends
  • Brandon went to a Board of Directors meeting at
    Hollygrove Children's Home with his mother.
    Hollygrove is a residential treatment center for
    abused and neglected children where she served as
    CEO and President.
  • Brandon sat in a corner with his hand-held video
    game. The adults listed a litany of obstacles to
    creating a library (e.g., books were too
    expensive, volunteers were scarce and the budget
    couldn't be stretched any farther).

104
Merry Christmas, Mom!
  • Brandon convinced his fellow classmates to help,
    "Everybody has books on their shelves that
    they've outgrown. Why not give the ones we've
    already read (which were still in good condition)
    to kids who need them? They collected 847 new
    and slightly used books that included
    biographies, mysteries, science fiction, fairy
    tales, picture books, and bestseller series.
  • On the last day of school before winter vacation,
    as his mother came to pick him up, a grinning
    Brandon stood on the sidewalk surrounded by
    dozens of boxes of books and exclaimed, "Merry
    Christmas, Mom!"

105
Bookends by Brandon
  • What began as a community service project for his
    class is now the grassroots nonprofit
    organization BookEnds, which has given away
    76,000 books to children in need, has completed
    23 libraries and has 19 other libraries in
    development. This will result in books and
    improved literacy opportunities for more than
    33,000 underprivileged kids and their families.
    Brandon, explained his mother, started this
    community.

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Brandon today
107
     Jacob Komar, Founder and CEO of Computers
for Communities, Inc. and a Davidson Scholar
  • Jacob Komar, age 13, from Burlington, CT,
    created Computers for Communities, Inc. in
    order to help close the digital divide. Four
    years ago he observed that well-off families had
    computers but those who were poor did not. He
    also saw thousands of outdated computers being
    discarded. Jacob put these two problems together
    and fashioned a solution. Given his amazing
    skills, he and other friends so far have been
    able to rebuild and give away over 1,000
    computers to families in need. He started the
    company when he was 9 years old!

108
In Jacobs words.
  • Since I am a computer fanatic, I was shocked when
    I learned that my sister's school was throwing
    away their old computers. I knew that there were
    many kids who didn't have computers at home.
  • I started a program called "Computers for
    Communities." First, I secured the school
    district's approval to take more than 60 old
    computers. Then I went to work restoring and
    upgrading them. I also had to get software
    licensing and install new software and hardware.
    I worked with the Department of Social Services
    to identify those most in need in my community.
    Finally, I installed them and have taught over
    200 family members how to use them.

109

 
  • NVIDIA Joins Forces with Jacob Komar,
    Twelve-Year-Old Founder of Computers for
    CommunitiesSilicon Valley Companies Work
    Together to Provide Technology Resources to Those
    in NeedSANTA CLARA, CADECEMBER 9, 2004NVIDIA
    Corporation (Nasdaq NVDA) today announced that
    it is hosting Silicon Valleys first Computers
    for Communities event.  A Connecticut-based
    non-profit organization, Computers for
    Communities was founded in 2001 by Jacob Komar,
    now twelve years old, after he discovered a
    roomful of discarded computers at his sisters
    school and realized there must be a better use
    for them. His premise was simple collect
    computers that are to be discarded, then
    refurbish and redistribute them to those in need.

110
  • "It's not too late. People who care will do
    something!"

111
The creative product interests of
students affected their post-secondary plans. In
many cases, their career interests were a
synthesis of their early Type III interests as
young children, leading to . . . Type IV--life
and career choices based on interests and
according to Baum, Hebert and Renzulli, reversed
their underachievement!
  • .

112
These types of creative learning activities would
not have happened without the sustained time that
gifted and talented students had in a gifted
program.. They would not have occurred within
regular classroom differentiated instruction.This
is why gifted program services are so
important--a continuum of services! And working
with parents!
113
Now, compare that.
  • What seems to be valued
  • by most politicians (except those in
    Colorado), many administrators, and even
  • the general public today?

114
Will this be on the Test?
115
What should children learn from gifted and
enrichment programs?
  • TIME to pursue their interests in areas they
    choose

116
What else? Exposure to topics children may love
117

Identification of their abilities and talents,
interests and styles. Who should have these
opportunities?
118
Students with special needs Its not just about
their deficits!
  • Sara and all of the IEP meetings! Why didnt I
    know what to ask?
  • Our friend, Susan Baum
  • Stop telling us what she cant do and start
    telling us what she can do..
  • Who is the most passionate teacher at this school?

119
Graduation from Miss Porters
  • High School experiences caused her to be
    depressed, worried, anxious, and to feel she was
    not good at anything..
  • Miss Porters School transition

120
Talent Development, Not Deficit Reduction!
  • Stop focusing on deficits and start focusing on
    strengths!

121
Baums Study of Using Enrichment Triad Model with
Students with LD
  • Creative Type III studies, when used as an
    intervention with high ability, learning disabled
    students, was associated with improvement in the
    students' behavior, specifically the ability to
    self-regulate time on task improve self-esteem
    and development specific learning strategies.

122
What Else Matters?
  • Timing and chance matter
  • Parents and teachers impact and influence
    Permission to be CREATIVE
  • Engaging, in-depth learning experiences based on
    interests
  • Changed Instruction and Pedagogy!

123
pportunities
esources
ncouragement
124
What Else Matters?
  • Creative work that makes a difference
  • A sense of purpose and destiny..
  • I had something inside of me that had to come
    out!

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What Else Matters?
  • Understanding the methods of practicing
    professional
  • Understanding the tools of the discipline!

128
  • What else matters in programs for gifted and
    talented students? What makes a difference in
    their subsequent lives, education, and work?

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Renzulli Learning--currently over 35,000
enrichment activities.
  • A dozen (or more) teaching assistants can enable
    you to challenge each student both in school and
    at home

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  • What else matters? Opportunities for Continuous
    Progress and Differentiated
  • Learning!

140
E
Enjoyment
Engagement
Enthusiasm
141
What Else Matters?
  • Understanding that ones gifts and talents can be
    used to make the world a better placeeven the
    immediate world of one small child.

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Now, compare that.
  • What seems to be valued by most politicians, many
    administrators, and even the general public
    today?

144
Will this be on the Test?
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AAre we Losing our Way..
  • In the Current Maze of Federal Mandates,
    Advanced Content, and Standardization?
  • Opportunities for Creative Productivity and
    Innovation must Be Integrated into Gifted and
    Talented Programs!the Maze of Federal Mandates,
    Advanced Content, and Standardization Whatever
    Happened to Creative Productivity as a Primary
    Goal of Gifted Educat

147
Schools should be places for Talent Development!
Latent talents
Emerging talents
Developed talents and gifts!
148
E. Paul Torrance Manifesto for Children
  • Dont be afraid to fall in love with something
    and pursue it with intensity.
  • Know, understand, take pride in, practice,
    develop, exploit, and enjoy your greatest
    strengths.
  • Find a great teacher or mentor who will help you.
  • Dont waste energy trying to be well rounded.
  • Do what you love and can do well.
  • ?

149
-Jane Goodall
  • Every individual matters.
  • Every individual has a role to play.
  • Every individual makes a difference.
  • And we have a choice
  • What sort of difference do we want to make?"
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