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V.%20A.Bacterial%20Diseases

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V. A. Bacterial Diseases A. Airborne Bacterial Diseases ... often in urinary tract infections Usually gamma reactive Detected biochemically V. A. 1. – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: V.%20A.Bacterial%20Diseases


1
V. A. Bacterial Diseases
  • A. Airborne Bacterial Diseases
  • B. Foodborne Waterborne Bacterial Diseases
  • C. Soilborne Bacterial Diseases
  • D. Arthropodborne Bacterial Diseases
  • E. Sexually Transmitted Bacterial Diseases
  • F. Miscellaneous Bacterial Diseases

2
V. A. Airborne Bacterial Diseases
  • 1. Streptococcal Diseases
  • 2. Diphtheria
  • 3. Pertussis
  • 4. Meningococcal Infections
  • 5. Haemophilus influenzae Infections
  • 6. Tuberculosis
  • 7. Pneumococcal Pneumonia
  • 8. Primary Atypical Pneumonia
  • 9. Legionellosis

Back to Main
3
V. A. 1. Streptococcal Diseases
  • Properties of the Genus Streptococcus
  • General Properties
  • Gram-positive Cocci in Chains or Pairs
  • Catalase Negative

Back to Main Back to Airborne
4
V. A. 1. Streptococcal Diseases
  • Properties of the Genus Streptococcus (cont.)
  • Hemolytic Reactions
  • Detected by Blood Agar Cultures
  • Beta Hemolysis
  • Complete Hemolysis
  • Clear Zone Around Colonies on Blood Agar
  • Alpha Hemolysis
  • Incomplete Hemolysis
  • Greenish Zone Around Colonies on Blood Agar
  • Gamma Reaction
  • Absence of a Hemolytic Reaction
  • No Change Around Colonies on Blood Agar

Back to Main Back to Airborne
5
V. A. 1. Streptococcal Diseases
  • Properties of the Genus Streptococcus (cont.)
  • Lancefield Groups
  • Based on Serological Groupings Also may be
    distinguished by Biochemical Testing or
    Antibiotic Sensitivity
  • Group A
  • Streptococcus pyogenes
  • The most virulent human pathogen of the genus
  • Beta hemolytic
  • Often identified by rapid serological tests or by
    antibiotic resistance

Back to Main Back to Airborne
6
V. A. 1. Streptococcal Diseases
  • Properties of the Genus Streptococcus (cont.)
  • Lancefield Groups (cont.)
  • Group B
  • Streptococcus agalactiae
  • Mildly to moderately virulent esp. in children
    elderly
  • Usually beta or alpha hemolytic some strains
    are gamma
  • Detected biochemically

Back to Main Back to Airborne
7
V. A. 1. Streptococcal Diseases
  • Properties of the Genus Streptococcus (cont.)
  • Lancefield Groups (cont.)
  • Group D
  • Includes the fecal streptococci (enterococci)
  • Normal colon flora in humans other animals
  • Genus Enterococcus
  • Several species eg. Enterococcus faecalis
  • Occasionally pathogenic often in urinary tract
    infections
  • Usually gamma reactive
  • Detected biochemically

Back to Main Back to Airborne
8
V. A. 1. Streptococcal Diseases
  • Diseases Associated with Streptococcus pyogenes
  • Respiratory Symptoms
  • Upper Respiratory Tract
  • Pharyngitis
  • Systemic Symptoms
  • Septicemia
  • Internal infections
  • Scarlet feverDue to strains that produce an
    erythrogenic toxin

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9
V. A. 1. Streptococcal Diseases
  • Diseases Associated with Streptococcus
    pyogenes(cont.)
  • Immune-Related Complications
  • Rheumatic fever
  • Glomerulonephritis
  • Other Conditions/Portals of Entry
  • Erysipelas
  • Necrotizing fasciitis
  • Puerperal sepsis

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10
V. A. 2. Diphtheria
  • Cause Corynebacterium diphtheriae
  • Properties of the Genus Corynebacterium
  • Gram-positive rods non-sporeforming
  • Coryneform (diphtheroid) arrangement
  • Snapping division
  • Metachromatic Granules
  • Several different species
  • Frequently found in soil in the skin flora
  • Only virulent strains of Corynebacterium
    diphtheriae are considered pathogenic

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11
V. A. 2. Diphtheria
  • Cause Corynebacterium diphtheriae
  • Properties of Corynebacterium diphtheriae
  • Virulent strains contain a extra gene that
    encodes for the diphtheria exotoxin
  • The exotoxin is a cytotoxin that inhibits
    protein synthesis -- kills host cells

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12
V. A. 2. Diphtheria
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Airborne contact with infected persons
  • Upper Respiratory Infection
  • Pseudomembrane Formation
  • May Spread into Bloodstream
  • Cardiovascular damage
  • Vaccination with diphtheria toxoid vaccine

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13
V. A. 3. Pertussis
  • Cause Bordetella pertussis
  • Gram-negative aerobic rod
  • Found among the respiratory flora of humans
    other animals
  • Transmission and Symptoms
  • Airborne contact with infected persons
  • Upper respiratory tract infection may be severe
    in children  elderly
  • Difficulty breathing staccato cough (whooping
    cough)
  • Usually does not spread into bloodstream

Back to Main Back to Airborne
14
V. A. 4. Meningococcal Infections
  • Cause Neiserria meningitidis
  • Properties of the Genus Neiserria
  • Gram-negative cocci in pairs
  • Several speciessome of which are normal colon
    flora
  • Fastidious nutritional requirementsGrow best on
    chocolate agar
  • Notable pathogenic species
  • Neiserria meningitidis
  • Neiserria gonorrhoeae

Back to Main Back to Airborne
15
V. A. 4. Meningococcal Infections
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Airborne contact with infected persons
  • Often associated with children with persons in
    close or crowded quarterseg. schools, daycare,
    etc.
  • Upper respiratory tract symptoms
  • Septicemia
  • Meningitis
  • Headache and stiff neck
  • Listlessness dizziness disorientation
  • Seizures coma death

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16
V. A. 5. Haemophilus influenzae Infections
  • Cause Haemophilus influenzae
  • Properties of the genus Haemophilus
  • Gram-negative rod
  • Facultatively anaerobic
  • Fastidious -- requires chocolate agarfor growth
  • Several species common among the respiratory
    flora

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17
V. A. 5. Haemophilus influenzae Infections
  • Cause Haemophilus influenzae (cont.)
  • Notable species
  • Haemophilus influenzae Several strains common
    in the upper respiratory tract. Type b is
    associated with some cases of bacterial
    meningitis type III is sometimes the cause of
    certain eye infections
  • Haemophilus ducreyii Causative agent of
    chanchroid

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18
V. A. 5. Haemophilus influenzae Infections
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Infections most frequently associated with the
    virulent strain, type b
  • Upper respiratory tract symptoms
  • Rhinitis and Sinusitis
  • Otitis media
  • Epiglottitis
  • Septicemia and Meningitis
  • Prevented by HIB vaccine

Back to Main Back to Airborne
19
V. A. 6. Tuberculosis
  • Cause Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  • Properties of the genus Mycobacterium
  • Acid-fast rods
  • Grow slowly some species are difficult to
    culture
  • Several speciessome found in soil and among
    skin flora
  • Major pathogenic species
  • Mycobacterium tuberculosis
  • Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare
  • Mycobacterium cheloni
  • Mycobacterium scrofulaceum
  • Mycobacterium leprae

Back to Main Back to Airborne
20
V. A. 6. Tuberculosis
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Transmission
  • Airborne Contact
  • Prolonged Exposure
  • Occasionally via skin contactor wounds

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21
V. A. 6. Tuberculosis
  • Transmission Symptoms (cont.)
  • Symptoms
  • Lung Infection
  • Destruction of alveoli
  • Cough sputum
  • Tubercle Formation
  • May remain dormant for yearsand then become
    active again
  • May spread to other areas of the bodyMiliary TB

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22
V. A. 6. Tuberculosis
  • Transmission Symptoms (cont.)
  • Detection
  • Microscopic examination
  • Chest X-Ray
  • Culture
  • Tuberculin Skin Test
  • TB Vaccination

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23
V. A. 7. Pneumococcal Pneumonia
  • Cause Streptococcus pneumoniae
  • Properties of the Genus -- See Earlier Notes
  • Formerly Known as Diplococcus pneumoniae
  • No Lancefield classification
  • Gram-positive diplococcivirulent strains are
    encapsulated
  • Alpha Hemolytic
  • A common cause of secondary bacterial pneumonia

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24
V. A. 7. Pneumococcal Pneumonia
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • A frequent cause of secondary bacterial pneumonia
  • Airborne transmission
  • Lower Respiratory Tract Infection
  • Pneumonia
  • Fluid Buildup in Lung

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25
V. A. 8. Primary Atypical Pneumonia
  • Cause Mycoplasma pneumoniae
  • Properties of the Genus Mycoplasma
  • Small, irregular cells
  • Naturally cell wall deficient
  • Several species
  • Common among respiratory flora in humans other
    animals

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26
V. A. 8. Primary Atypical Pneumonia
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Airborne Transmission
  • May be opportunistic
  • Frequently causes mild cases of primary pneumonia
  • Mycoplasma pneumoniae may also cause severe
    secondary pneumonia in immunocompromised patients

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27
V. A. 9. Legionellosis
  • Cause Legionella pneumophila
  • Properties of the genus Legionella
  • Gram-negative rods
  • Strictly aerobic
  • Found in highly aerated, moist environmentseg.
    streams
  • May parasitize certain aquatic protozoa
  • Can contaminate building ventilation systems, air
    filters, etc.

Back to Main Back to Airborne
28
V. A. 9. Legionellosis
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Airborne
  • Contact with infected persons or environments
  • Mild to Moderate Pneumonia

Back to Main Back to Airborne
29
V. B. Foodborne Waterborne Bacterial Diseases
  • 1. Foodborne Intoxications vs Infections
  • 2. Botulism
  • 3. Staphylococcal Food Poisoning
  • 4. Clostridial Food Poisoning
  • 5. Typhoid Fever
  • 6. Salmonellosis
  • 7. Shigellosis
  • 8. Cholera
  • 9. Diseases associated with Escherichia coli
  • 10. Camphylobacteriosis and Helicobacteriosis

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30
V. B. 1. Foodborne Intoxications vs Infections
  • Foodborne intoxications Caused by the exotoxin
    secreted by bacteria in contaminated food
  • Foodborne infections Caused by the ingestion of
    live bacteria that colonize the digestive tract

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31
V. B. 2. Botulism
  • Cause Clostridium botulinum
  • Properties of the genus Clostridium
  • Gram-positive rod
  • Strictly anaerobic
  • Spore-former
  • Widely distributed, especially in soil
  • Important species
  • Clostridium botulinum
  • Clostridium perfringins
  • Clostridium tetani

Back to Main Back to Food- and Waterborne
32
V. B. 2. Botulism
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Transmitted via contaminated food
  • Botulinum toxin
  • A neurotoxic exotoxin
  • Heat sensitive
  • Inhibits synaptic transmission at motor neuron
    end plates
  • Causes flaccid paralysis
  • Very deadly Death due to respiratory cardiac
    failure
  • Treatment Administration of antitoxin

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33
V. B. 2. Botulism
  • Transmission Symptoms (cont.)
  • Other mechanisms of transmission
  • Wound botulism
  • Animal botulism
  • Infant botulism

Back to Main Back to Food- and Waterborne
34
V. B. 3. Staphylococcal Food Poisoning
  • Cause Staphylococcus aureus
  • Properties of the genus Staphylococcus
  • Gram positive coccus in clusters
  • Catalase positive
  • Two major species
  • Staph. aureus is more virulent is coagulase
    positive
  • Staph epidermidis is more common is coagulase
    negative
  • Both are common skin upper RT flora

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35
V. B. 3. Staphylococcal Food Poisoning
  • Transmission  Symptoms
  • Certain strains of Staph. aureus Produce
    staphylococcal enterotoxin
  • Toxin is secreted in contaminated food
  • Causes abdominal pain, nausea, diarrhea, for a
    few hours
  • Staph. aureus enterotoxin is unusually
    heat-resistant

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36
V. B. 4. Clostridial Food Poisoning
  • Cause Clostridium perfringins
  • Certain strains secrete an enterotoxic exotoxin
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Similar to staphylococcal food poisoning, except
    that the clostridial enterotoxin is not as
    heat-stable

Back to Main Back to Food- and Waterborne
37
V. B. 5. Typhoid Fever
  • Cause Salmonella typhi
  • Properties of the genus Salmonella
  • A member of the family Enterobacteriaceae
  • Colon flora sometimes carried asymptomatically
  • Gram negative rods
  • Facultatively anaerobic
  • Salmonella typhi
  • Most virulent member of the genus

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38
V. B. 5. Typhoid Fever
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Transmission via oral route
  • often associated with contact with infected
    persons, either symptomatic or carriers
  • sewage
  • flies

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39
V. B. 5. Typhoid Fever
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Invades intestinal epithelium tissue
  • ulceration
  • bloody stools but little diarrhea
  • Blood invasion
  • fever delirium
  • blood vessel hemorrhaging
  • rose-colored spots on the abdomen
  • bowel perforation
  • gall-bladder infection

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40
V. B. 6. Salmonellosis
  • Cause Salmonella serotypes
  • Serotypes of the genus Salmonella other than S.
    typhi
  • Hundreds of serotypes species names exist but
    are often not reported
  • Examples
  • Salmonella enteriditis
  • Salmonella gallinarum
  • Salmonella typhimurum

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41
V. B. 6. Salmonellosis
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Contaminated food
  • Meat
  • Poultry products
  • Dairy products
  • Gastroenteritis
  • Cramps
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Diarrhea

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42
V. B. 7. Shigellosis
  • Cause Shigella species
  • Genus Shigella
  • A member of the family Enterobacteriaceae
  • Colon flora sometimes carried asymptomatically
  • Gram negative rods
  • Facultatively anaerobic
  • Species
  • Shigella sonnei
  • Shigella dysenteriae
  • Shigella flexneri
  • Shigella boydii

Back to Main Back to Food- and Waterborne
43
V. B. 7. Shigellosis
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Transmission
  • Similar to salmonellosis
  • Gastroenteritis
  • Often with watery diarrhea
  • Sometimes with bloody stools Dysentery

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44
V. B. 8. Cholera
  • Cause Vibrio cholerae
  • Genus Vibrio
  • Gram-negative curved bacteria
  • comma-shaped
  • facultatively anaerobic
  • Normal flora in many animals
  • Notable Pathogenic Species
  • Vibrio cholerae
  • Vibrio parahaemolyticus

Back to Main Back to Food- and Waterborne
45
V. B. 8. Cholera
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Transmission
  • Contaminated food
  • shellfish
  • vermin
  • livestock

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46
V. B. 8. Cholera
  • Transmission Symptoms (cont.)
  • Gastroenteritis with extensive severe diarrhea
  • Cholera enterotoxin
  • Toxin blocks water reabsorption by inhibiting the
    anion active transport mechanism in large
    intestinal epithelium
  • Rice water stools
  • Dehydration death
  • Recent epidemic due to spread of new
    drug-resistant strain

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47
V. B. 9. Diseases associated with Escherichia coli
  • Cause Escherichia coli
  • Family Enterobacteriaceae
  • Gram-negative rods
  • Facultatively anaerobic
  • Widely distributed among humans animals
  • Normal colon flora
  • Used as indicator of water food contamination

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48
V. B. 9. Diseases associated with Escherichia coli
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Oral route
  • Extremely common normal flora
  • Different strains in different geographical
    regions
  • Colonize gut in infancy
  • Infantile diarrhea
  • Traveler's diarrhea

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49
V. B. 9. Diseases associated with Escherichia coli
  • Transmission Symptoms (cont.)
  • E. coli strain O157H7
  • A rare, particular virulent deadly strain
  • Hemorrhagic E. coli disease
  • Kidney damage in children

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50
V. B. 10. Camphylobacteriosis and
Helicobacteriosis
  • Camphylobacter jejuni
  • Gram-negative spirillum
  • Microaerophilic
  • Normal flora of colon
  • Common cause of mild to moderate gastroenteritis

Back to Main Back to Food- and Waterborne
51
V. B. 10. Camphylobacteriosis and
Helicobacteriosis
  • Helicobacter pylori
  • Gram-negative spirillum
  • Microaerophilic
  • Can colonize the stomach lining underneath the
    protective mucous layer
  • Stomach irritation and ulcers

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52
V. C. Soilborne Bacterial Diseases
  • 1. Anthrax
  • 2. Tetanus
  • 3. Gas Gangrene
  • 4. Leptospirosis
  • 5. Listeriosis

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53
V. C. 1. Anthrax
  • Cause Bacillus anthracis
  • Genus Bacillus
  • Gram-positive rods
  • Facultatively anaerobic
  • Spore-forming
  • Widely distributed in soil
  • Many species Bacillus anthracis is the most
    important human pathogen of the group

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54
V. C. 1. Anthrax
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Transmission
  • Contact with contaminated soil
  • Livestock
  • Through skin wounds abrasions
  • Also through oral route or airborne
  • Skin anthrax
  • Intestinal anthrax
  • Pulmonary anthrax Woolsorters disease

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55
V. C. 2. Tetanus
  • Cause Clostridium tetani
  • Genus properties See Botulism
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Wounds esp. deep or puncture wounds
  • Tetanospasmin A neurotoxic exotoxin
  • Acts as a cholinesterase inhibitor
  • Short-circuits nerve synapses esp. in the
    central nervous system
  • Causes rigid paralysis
  • Treatment Antitoxins plus muscle relaxants
  • Prevention Vaccination with tetanus toxoid

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56
V. C. 3. Gas Gangrene
  • Often caused by Clostridium perfringins
  • Genus properties See Botulism
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Wounds esp. deep wounds
  • Gangrene
  • Tissue death due to reduced oxygen to tissue
  • Gas or moist gangrene Gangrene accompanied by
    bacterial infection
  • Swelling tissue death blackish discoloration

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57
V. C. 4. Leptospirosis
  • Cause Leptospira interrogans
  • A spirochete
  • Found in soil contaminated with animal waste
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Contact with contaminated soil or animals
  • Often enters through the feet
  • Spreads to several organs, including liver,
    kidney, meninges
  • Jaundice may be present
  • May have bloody vomit

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58
V. C. 5. Listeriosis
  • Cause Listeria monocytogenes
  • Genus Listeria
  • Small Gram-positive rods
  • Non-sporeforming
  • Found in soil esp in soil contaminated with
    animal waste

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59
V. C. 5. Listeriosis
  • Transmission  Symptoms
  • Contact with contaminated soil
  • Also possibly transmitted via contaminated food
  • Listeric meningitis
  • Blood infection with high white count
  • Uterine infections miscarriage or congenital
    damage

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60
V. D. Arthropodborne Bacterial Diseases
  • 1. Plague
  • 2. Lyme Disease
  • 3. Rocky Mt. Spotted Fever
  • 4. Epidemic Typhus
  • 5. Endemic Typhus

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61
V. D. 1. Plague
  • Cause Yersinia pestis
  • Gram-negative, facultatively anaerobic rods
  • in Family Enterobactereaceae however, not
    normally found in colon
  • Characterized by bipolar staining

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62
V. D. 1. Plague
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Vector Fleas, esp. rodent fleas
  • Bubonic plague Infection of lymph node tissue
    swelling hemorrhaging buboes
  • Septicemic plague
  • Pneumonic plague
  • Cases of airborne transmission among humans have
    been noted

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63
V. D. 2. Lyme Disease
  • Cause Borrelia burgdorferi
  • A spirochete
  • Transmitted by deer ticks
  • First noted in Northeastern US

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64
V. D. 2. Lyme Disease
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Vector Ticks of the genus Ixodes (deer ticks)
    may be transmitted by both immature mature
    ticks
  • Incubation period of several weeks
  • Initial symptoms
  • Flu-like symptoms
  • Rash Erythema chronicum migrans (ECM)
  • Several weeks/months later
  • Joint pain/swelling
  • Arthritis-like symptoms
  • Cardiovascular nervous system damage

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65
V. D. 3. Rocky Mt. Spotted Fever
  • Cause Rickettsia rickettsii
  • A rickettsia Small, gram-negative bacterium
    Obligately intracellular parasite
  • Detected by serological testing, eg. the
    Weil-Felix test (Reaction of serum to Proteus
    OX19)
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Vector Ticks
  • Macropapipular rash begins on palms soles then
    spreads to other parts of the body
  • High fever other flu-like symptoms

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66
V. D. 4. Epidemic Typhus
  • Cause Rickettsia prowasekii
  • Genus properties See Rocky Mt. Spotted Fever
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Vector Human Louse
  • Epidemics often in areas with reduced sanitation
  • High fever high fatality rate
  • Rash begins on trunk of body spreads to
    extremities

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67
V. D. 5. Endemic Typhus
  • Cause Rickettsia typhi
  • Genus properties See Rocky Mt. Spotted Fever
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Vector Fleas esp. rodent fleas
  • Endemic in many areas
  • Often with mild or no symptoms

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68
V. E. Sexually Transmitted Bacterial Diseases
  • 1. Syphilis
  • 2. Gonorrhea
  • 3. Chlamydia
  • 4. Chanchroid

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69
V. E. 1. Syphilis
  • Cause Treponema pallidum
  • A spirochete
  • Cannot be cultured on lab medium
  • Detected microscopically or serologically

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70
V. E. 1. Syphilis
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Transmission Sexual contact or congenitally
  • Primary Syphilis
  • Few days after contact
  • Hard Chancre
  • Secondary Syphilis
  • Several weeks after chancre disappears
  • Fever flu-like symptoms
  • Rash

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71
V. E. 1. Syphilis
  • Transmission Symptoms (cont.)
  • Tertiary Syphilis
  • Months or years later
  • Gummae Lesions on skin  mucous membranes
  • Damage to internal organs
  • Cardiovascular central nervous system damage

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72
V. E. 2. Gonorrhea
  • Cause Neiserria gonorrhoeae
  • Genus Properties See Neiserria meningitidis
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Transmission Sexual contact or congenital
  • Urinary Tract Symptoms
  • Urethritis Burning sensation discharge
  • Cystitis kidney infection
  • Male Reproductive Tract Symptoms
  • Prostatitis
  • Inflammation of epididymis  testes sometimes
    sterility

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73
V. E. 2. Gonorrhea
  • Transmission Symptoms (cont.)
  • Female Reproductive Tract Symptoms
  • Uterine Infections
  • Fallopian Tube inflammation blockage occasional
    sterility
  • Pelvic Inflammatory Disease
  • Other Infections
  • Gonococcal Eye Infections
  • Respiratory Tract Infections

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74
V. E. 3. Chlamydia
  • Cause Chlamydia trachomatis
  • Genus Properties
  • A small, Gram-negative bacterium
  • Obligately intracellular parasite similar to
    Rickettsia
  • Occasionally carried subclinically as part of the
    normal vaginal flora

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75
V. E. 3. Chlamydia
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Very similar to gonorrhea Often mistaken for
    gonorrhea
  • Important to distinguish because the treatment is
    different from gonorrhea
  • Identified by serological testing
  • Transmission Sexual contact or congenital
  • Urinary and Reproductive Tract Symptoms
  • Respiratory Tract and Eye Infections

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76
V. E. 4. Chanchroid
  • Cause Haemophilus ducreyii
  • Genus Properties See Haemophilus influenzae
  • Haemophilus ducreyii is occasionally found among
    the vaginal flora or under the prepuce in males
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Transmission Sexual contact
  • Symptoms
  • Painful soft chancre sometimes mistaken for
    syphilis
  • Urethritis occasional pelvic inflammation

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77
V. F. Miscellaneous Bacterial Diseases
  • 1. Leprosy
  • 2. Staphylococcal Infections
  • 3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections

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78
V. F. 1. Leprosy
  • Cause Mycobacterium leprae
  • Genus Properties See Tuberculosis
  • Cannot be cultured detected by skin biopsy
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Skin contact not particularly contagious
  • Whitish skin lesions
  • Loss of sensation due to nerve damage
  • Disfiguration

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79
V. F. 2. Staphylococcal Infections
  • Cause Staphylococcus aureus
  • Genus Properties See Staph. Food Poisoning
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Skin contact opportunistic
  • Skin Infections
  • Acne boils pimples
  • Abscesses carbuncles
  • Impetigo
  • Scalded Skin Syndrome
  • Toxic Shock Syndrome
  • Septicemia High fever

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80
V. F. 3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections
  • Cause Pseudomonas aeruginosa
  • Genus Pseudomonas
  • Gram-negative rods
  • Nonfermentative metabolism
  • Most species are strictly aerobic
  • Widely distributed in aquatic moist soil
    environments
  • Can contaminate moist aerated surfaces water
    faucets respiration equipment

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V. F. 3. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections
  • Transmission Symptoms
  • Frequently an opportunistic or a nosocomial
    infection
  • Respiratory tract infections
  • Urinary tract infections
  • Infections in burn patients

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