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Parent Involvement in Schools

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Delphine Sellars. Durham County, NC Cooperative Extension. Agenda ... Delphine Sellars. NC Cooperative Extension. Who We Are? Parents, Grandparents, ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Parent Involvement in Schools


1
Parent Involvement in Schools
  • A CYFERnet Interactive Telephone Training

2
Presenters
  • Karen DeBord
  • North Carolina State University
  • Harriett EdwardsNorth Carolina State University
  • Wally Goddard
  • University of Arkansas
  • Susan Jakes
  • North Carolina State University
  • Geraldine Peeples University of Illinois
  • Delphine Sellars Durham County, NC Cooperative
    Extension

3
Agenda
  • Defining parent involvement in schools
  • Why involvement?
  • Barriers to parental involvement
  • Creative solutions for getting parents involved
  • Promising practices

4
The Why and How of Parental Involvement in Schools
  • Susan Jakes, Ph.D.
  • North Carolina State University

5
Why Get Involved?Cotton and Wikelund (2006)
Greater achievement
Greater active involvement

Earlier involvement
More powerful effects

6
Benefits of InvolvementSouthwest Educational
Development Laboratory (2002)
  • Earn higher grades and test scores, and enroll in
    higher-level programs
  • Be promoted, pass their classes and earn credits
  • Attend school regularly
  • Have better social skills, show improved behavior
    and adapt well to school
  • Graduate and go on to post-secondary education

7
Parent Involvement at Home
  • Respond to school requests
  • Help with homework and schoolwork
  • Provide encouragement
  • Arrange appropriate study time and space
  • Model desired behaviors
  • Talk about school experience
  • Expect children to do well in school

8
Parent Involvement in the Schools
  • Communicate with teacher about child
  • Attend school functions
  • Volunteer to help with activities
  • Volunteer to work in the classroom
  • Serve as source of support to teacher
  • Serve on school volunteer boards
  • Leadership
  • Fundraising

9
Parent Involvement in the Community
  • Act as school advocate
  • Take an active role in planning, developing, and
    governing education at the community level
  • Support education policies and bonds

Durham NC charter school policy group
10
See Resource List and Search CYFERnet forParent
Involvement
11
Parent Involvement
  • Karen DeBord. Ph.D.
  • North Carolina State University

12
Ask Parents
  • What are your hopes and dreams for your children?

13
How Will Children Reach This Goal?
  • Positive environments (home, school, community)
  • Positive role models
  • A sense of belonging, a sense of hope and future
    (a bright tomorrow)
  • Loving with limits and parameters
  • Acceptance, autonomy

14
What Will Make a Difference?
  • Highly stressed lives, economy
  • Technological world
  • Disengagement
  • Face time

15
Parents Who Are Involved
  • Baking brownies?
  • Connections throughout the lifetime
  • How to do it?
  • Gaze, meet needs
  • Play, attend and attune
  • Backpack checks
  • Home-school/care communication
  • Monitoring
  • Recognizing opportunities to connect

16
Whats the RISK When Families and Communities Are
Disengaged?
  • Child neglect
  • Increased mental health referrals, foster care,
    attachment issues, relationship issues
  • School failure/retention issues
  • Disengaged at school, school reform backfires
  • Unskilled workforce
  • Unprepared, employers not able to find qualified
    workers
  • Weak economy

17
Total Package
  • Involvement of parent with child
  • Involvement of school with parent and child
  • Investment of community with schools and families
  • All of our responsibility

18
Why Dont Parents Get Involved at School?
Barriers to Parental Involvement
  • Harriett Edwards, Ed.D.
  • North Carolina State University

19
What Are the Barriers?
  • Discomfort with formal education setting for
    parents
  • Schools comfort level with inviting parents into
    the building
  • School systems tolerance for risk
  • Parental attitude
  • Traditional concepts of what school volunteers do

20
Discomfort With Formal Education Setting
  • Memories of less than pleasant school
    experiences
  • Lack of personal success in formal education
    endeavors
  • Issues with (perceived) authority figures

21
Schools Comfort Level With Inviting Parents Into
the Building
  • Teachers willingness to empower volunteers
  • Additional work to set up program and supervise
    additional people
  • Open to public involvement can mean additional
    public scrutiny
  • Teachers/administrators may need training to
    involve volunteers

22
School Systems Tolerance for Risk
  • Application screening process
  • Administrative support for volunteers
  • Volunteers are not free just cost-effective

23
Parental Attitude
  • Teachers are paid to educate, so why should I go
    do their job
  • Already involved in too many things
  • Let one of the other parents do it this time
  • My child wouldnt want me there

24
Traditional Concepts of What School Volunteers Do
  • Library work
  • Class Mom
  • Babysit for teacher meetings
  • Cafeteria lady
  • Reading group monitor

25
Cultural Competence Diversity Factors in School
Parental Involvement Why Does It Matter?
  • Gerri Peeples
  • University of Illinois

26
The Run Down
  • Current situation
  • Things to think about
  • Diversity competence
  • Redefining spaces
  • Diverse populations and academics
  • Spotlight on barriers to parental involvement
  • Closing thoughts

27
Current Situations
  • White non-Hispanic population growth
  • African-American population increases
  • Latino population increases
  • Other population groups
  • Asian/pacific islander
  • Native American
  • Recent immigrants

28
Current SituationPersisting Educational
InequalityCredit to Lleras, C., University of
Illinois
  • By the end of high school, Hispanic and
    African-American students have math and reading
    skills that are comparable to White middle school
    students
  • (U.S. Department of Education, 2002)

29
Current SituationPersisting Educational
Inequality Credit to Lleras, C., University of
Illinois
  • In 2003, only 55 of African-American and 52 of
    Hispanic students graduated from high school on
    time with a regular diploma, compared to 78 of
    Whites
  • (Greene and Winters 2006)

30
Current SituationPersisting Educational
Inequality Credit to Lleras, C., University of
Illinois
  • 35 of Whites have a bachelors degree or higher
    compared to 17 of African-Americans and 11 of
    Hispanics

31
Current SituationPersisting Educational
Inequality
  • Empirical evidence shows racial gaps in
    achievement are present prior to kindergarten and
    persist and grow throughout elementary and
    secondary school years
  • (Jencks and Philips 1998 Lee and
  • Burkam 2002 Fryer and Levitt 2005)

32
Things to Think About
  • What do we really know about
  • Recent immigrants?
  • Hispanics the diversity within?
  • Middle income, married African-Americans?
  • Low income whites?
  • American Indians/native Americans

33
Things to Think About
  • Diversity competence for
  • Schools and educators
  • Making the case
  • Diverse populations and academics
  • Expanding the focus

34
Diversity/Cultural Competence
  • Individuals become culturally competent when they
    develop an awareness and acceptance of
    differences along with cultural knowledge, an
    awareness of their own cultural values,
    understanding of the dynamics of difference, and
    an ability to adapt their practice to the
    cultural context of the community
  • (Broadwater, 2001)

35
Redefining Spaces
  • Parental involvement for diverse populations
  • Shared spaces
  • Parents
  • Schools
  • Communities

36
Barriers Faced By Parents Credit to Behnke, A.,
North Carolina State University
Language/Literacy
Unfamiliar and intimidating systems
Attitudes of Personnel
Life factors
Past Educational Experiences
Work schedules
Child care
Lack of Information
Transportation
37
Creative Solutions
  • Engaging, Involving, and Sustaining
  • Parent Involvement for
  • Non-Traditional Parents
  • Gerri Peeples
  • Harriet Edwards
  • Wally Goddard

38
Informing the Process from Diverse Points of View
  • Latino
  • African-American
  • Recent Immigrants
  • Culture Ethnicity

39
Essential Elements
  • Collaboration
  • Build credible partnerships
  • Creative communication strategies
  • Address multiple domains

40
Critical Elements in Outreach for Sustainable
Parent Involvement
  • Family involvement
  • Active teacher outreach
  • Parent involvement
  • School-family partnerships

41
Toward Creative Solutions
  • Learn about different models and best practices
  • Appreciate the complexity and interrelationship
    of strategies
  • Early prevention and intervention
  • Invest in training and development for all
    involved

42
Barriers Inform the Paths Toward Solutions
  • Language and communication
  • Mainstream orientation
  • Information and resources
  • Fear factors

43
Think Parents Communities!
  • Teens want (and need) to be involved
  • Extension volunteers (4-H, ECA, etc.) are looking
    for opportunities to contribute to their
    communities
  • Extension staff can offer models of volunteer
    management that will support increased parent and
    volunteer involvement in schools

44
You Have to Ask!
  • Ask other volunteers to ask!
  • Hard to say no when asking a parent to contribute
    to his/her childs success
  • Have position descriptions ready before
    recruiting begins
  • Accept no as a response

45
Variety Is Key!
  • Create numerous position descriptions to meet
    classroom or school needs
  • Flexibility in scheduling when possible
  • Are there virtual jobs?
  • Are there tasks with little or no student
    contact?
  • Are there jobs for all educational levels?

46
Recognize, Reward, Retain
  • Personal thank yous go a long way
  • Appreciation from students has special meaning
  • Small rewards can mean a great return on a small
    investment
  • Positive experiences contribute to continued
    involvement

47
Parent Involvement in Arkansas
  • Wally Goddard, Ph.D.
  • University of Arkansas

48
Act 603 Mandated
  • Parent information in schools
  • Training of teachers in parent involvement

49
Unfunded Mandate
  • Unique opportunity for Extension

50
The Parenting Journey
  • Map

DVD
51
The Parenting JourneyCont.
  • 7 Travel Guides

52
Spread the Word At
  • State Parent Involvement Conference
  • State Parent Education Conference

53
Train School Personnel With Parenting Journey
54
The School Need Fits With Our Resources
55
Strengthening Families Coalition
  • Parent and Family Advocacy and Support Training
    (PFAST)
  • Latino Parent and Family Advocacy and Support
    Training (LPFAST)
  • Delphine Sellars
  • NC Cooperative Extension

56
Who We Are?
  • Parents,
  • Grandparents,
  • Community volunteers,
  • Organizations,
  • PFAST LPFAST graduates.

57
What is PFAST and LPFAST?
  • PFAST and LPFAST
  • six-session advocacy training for parents, family
    members or other involved adults who want to
    learn how to help their child achieve and better
    navigate the public schools.
  • Topics and sequence are identical cultural,
    language and translation required contextual
    changes

58
Training Structure
  • Sessions focus on a different topic each week
  • From 600-800 p.m. weekly
  • 2 co-facilitators some are former PFAST
    parents.
  • Parent support
  • Onsite childcare
  • Dinner
  • Transportation (case-by-case)

59
What Topics Does PFAST Cover?
  • Each session has a different theme, but are
    interconnected.
  • Goals for each session are shared.
  • Each session includes time for reflection and a
    simple homework assignment.

60
Session Topics
  • Parent involvement and advocacy
  • School communication
  • Communicationputting it all into practice
  • Standards and testing
  • Exceptional children and support systems
  • Moving to action

61
Outcomes Through Evaluation, We Have Learned
  • Some parents develop an interest in leadership
    and helping other parents Others have the time
    and energy to only focus on their child(ren).
  • Parents know how and when to call for a
    parent-teacher conference and display some
    familiarity with key school lingo (EOG,
    site-based, NCLB, etc.).
  • Parents report greater comfort at being able to
    find out what they need to know and knowing who
    to ask.
  • Through self-report, parents report a positive
    change in style or approach to school concerns,
    which is more focused on problem-solving and
    finding partners.
  • Parents learn from each other (and we learn from
    them) new resources and approaches to challenges.

62
Unique Qualities PFAST and LPFAST Benefits for
Parents
  • Not a one-shot trainingGraduates receive
    ongoing support and information
  • Parents interested in Leadership can participate
    in a more intensive Parents as Leaders Academy
    (PAL) leadership training.
  • Some parents become part of Coalitionour
    governing body
  • Each parent creates a personal plan for action
  • CEU credits offered through NC State
  • Parents receive a resource notebook with
    materials from each session

63
Lessons We Learned
  • Create a vision for the issue
  • Keep it together lead agency
  • Build commitment and leadership
  • Respond to the varied dimensions of
    accountability

64
Create a Vision
  • Create a vision for the issue.
  • Who will take the initiative?
  • Keep it together.

65
Lead Agency Keeping It Together
  • Team mission, goal and vision
  • When you know there is no money
  • Its OK to leave
  • New members mission clarification

66
Building Commitment and Leadership
  • Collaborations partnerships develop, nurture
  • The art of negotiation
  • Adapting to change group dynamics, knowledge
    level, capacity
  • Stages of leadership initial, shared,
    development within
  • Shared vision promoting your efforts

67
The Varied Dimensions of Accountability
  • Value parents, families, community, funders,
    stakeholders
  • Resources
  • Awareness
  • Utilization

68
Funding
  • Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation Community
    Problem Solving Grant
  • Support from Fiscal AgentDurham Cooperative
    Extension
  • Contributions (in-kind) from coalition members
    and community partners
  • Grant for LPFAST from North Carolina A T
    University

69
Contact Information
  • Strengthening Families Coalition
  • Durham Cooperative Extension
  • 721 Foster Street
  • Durham, NC 27701
  • Delphine Sellars (919)560-0538
  • dsellars_at_co.durham.nc.us
  • Donna Rewalt (919)560-0522
  • drewalt_at_co.durham.nc.us

70
Conclusion and Questions
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