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Australias Vocational Education

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Growth Strategies for Secondary Education in Asia. Kuala Lumpur ... Bachelor's Degree. Associate Degree. Advanced diploma. Diploma. By sector of. accreditation ... – PowerPoint PPT presentation

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Title: Australias Vocational Education


1
  • Australias Vocational Education Training
    System and its Links with Secondary Education
  • Growth Strategies for Secondary Education in Asia
  • Kuala Lumpur 19 September 2005
  • Dr Wendy Jarvie
  • Deputy Secretary,
  • Department of Education, Science and Training
  • Australia

2
THIS PRESENTATION
  • Why has Australia developed a strong vocational
    education and training (VET) system?
  • How does the VET system work?
  • Who are its students and whom does it serve?
  • The links between secondary education and
    vocational training

3
  • Why has Australia
  • developed such a strong
  • Vocational Education
  • Training (VET)
  • system?

4
There are a range of reasons
  • Reduce youth unemployment
  • Provide high skilled labour for a developed
    economy
  • University qualifications do not meet the needs
    of all industries
  • Re-training and up-skilling
  • Re-entry to the labour market

5
Having a post-school qualification makes a
significant difference
6
More jobs may need VET skills than university
qualifications
7
  • The vocational
  • education and training system

8
Australia is a federation . .
  • of 6 States and 2 Territories
  • States and Territories are responsible for
    education and training

9
The Australian Government has national leadership
on VET policy
  • It also provides
  • One third funding for the public sector
  • Funding for specific programs
  • in particular apprenticeships

10
States and Territories own most of the VET
system
  • provide around two-thirds of the funding
  • are responsible for regulating the sector
  • administer their own training systems
  • are the owners of public Technical and Further
    Education (TAFE) institutes

11
VET has strong links with the other education
sectors
Vocational Education Training
HigherEducation
Schools
  • voluntary
  • education in the general disciplines or as
    preparation for a professional career
  • delivery mainly by Universities, which combine
    teaching and research
  • compulsory general education to age 15 or 16
    (around Year 10)
  • and
  • 2 extra years of voluntary senior secondary
    studies (may be both general and vocational).
  • voluntary
  • work related education at the entry-level,
    technician and para-professional levels
  • apprentices and trainees
  • delivery mainly through institutes of Technical
    and Further Education

12
A national recognition framework links
qualifications between the sectors
Universities
Vocational Technical Education Training
Doctoral Degree Masters Degree Graduate
Diploma Graduate Certificate Bachelors
Degree Associate Degree Advanced diploma Diploma
By sector of accreditation
Vocational Graduate Diploma Vocational Graduate
Certificate Advanced Diploma Diploma Certificate
IV Certificate III Certificate II Certificate I
Schools
Senior Secondary Certificates of Education
13
VET is the largest post-school sector
14
VET is an important pathway between education and
employment in Australia
15
Australias VET system has a number of key
features
  • A national system
  • Industry led
  • Pathways available
  • Flexible and modular
  • Competency, not time, based
  • Focus on apprenticeships
  • All ages benefit

16
The national VET system national qualifications
quality plus competition
17
National consistency in quality and training
products
  • National quality assurance and recognition
    arrangements
  • Australian Quality Training Framework
  • National training products
  • Training Packages
  • accredited courses

18
Industry plays a key role
NATIONAL GOVERNANCE AND ACCOUNTABILITY FRAMEWORK
INDUSTRY LEADERSHIP AND ENGAGEMENT
NATIONAL SKILLS FRAMEWORK
Determine basis for training standards
competencies Input to Training Packages
qualifications Input to recognition,
accreditation regulation
Advice to Ministerial Council Input to
planning policy development Input to
national research and analysis priorities
National Industry Skills Council Industry
Skills Councils Action Groups
19
Training is Competency Based
  • Time based training ?
  • competency level attained
  • Training Packages
  • 75 Training Packages nationally
  • cover 80 of the workforce
  • outcomes determined by industry

20
Training Packages are the foundation of the system
21
Australias VET system performs well
22
  • VET Students

23
Students choose VET for a variety of reasons
24
A good spread of ages participates
25
Students learn and train in many locations
  • TAFE and other Government providers
  • Commercial training providers
  • Adult and community education organisations
  • Enterprises
  • Secondary schools

26
across a range of industries
27
VET participants are diverse
  • 1.6 million students undertook training
    -
    Male 834,500 (52)

    - Female 760,700 (48)
  • 50 undertook short, focussed programs
  • 89.4 undertook part-time training
  • 382,400 were New Apprentices
  • 211,828 students undertook VET in Schools

28
  • Links
  • between secondary schools
  • and vocational
  • and technical training

29
Many reasons for offering VET in secondary
schools . .
  • Make school more attractive for the 70 of
    students who will not go on immediately to
    university.
  • strong commitment to general education in schools
  • balance this with more employment-related
    curriculum
  • Support disengaged young people and those at risk
    of leaving early
  • need for alternative pathways between school and
    employment
  • meet specific industry needs in key locations

30
Nearly 60 of school leavers go into training or
employment
31
Three ways to study VET subjects in secondary
school
  • VET in Schools
  • School-based New Apprenticeships
  • Australian Technical Colleges

32
What is VET in Schools?
  • programs undertaken by school students as part of
    the senior secondary certificate
  • provide credit towards a nationally recognised
    VET qualification
  • training that reflects specific industry
    competency standards
  • delivered by a Registered Training Organisation

33
There is significant involvement
  • 49 per cent of school students
  • Across 95 per cent of schools

34
All school types are involved
35
Students encounter a range of industry training
36
School-Based New Apprenticeships incorporate
employment
  • Based on a formal arrangement with an employer
  • Opportunity to gain a recognised VET
    qualification in conjunction with completing a
    senior secondary certificate.
  • Participating as a full-time student and a
    part-time employee.

37
New technical secondary schools aim to meet
particular industry and region needs
38
School/VET links are central to the new National
Training System
  • Principles
  • Industry and business needs must drive training
    policies, priorities and delivery
  • Better quality training and outcomes for clients
    must be assured
  • Processes should be simplified and streamlined
  • Young people must have opportunities to gain a
    range of skills that provide a foundation for
    their working lives
  • Training opportunities need to be expanded in
    areas of current and expected skill shortage

39
(No Transcript)
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